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    • CommentAuthorsally
    • CommentTimeMay 1st 2013
     
    Japanese knotweed, an alien species, controlled under law, causes problems on many sites and is notoriously difficult to get rid of.

    Japanese Knotweed Solutions Company (JKSL), based in Radcliffe, is hosting a special free, all-day seminar, ‘Invasive Plants – Myths and Legends’, to be held on 22 May 2013 at Manchester’s Museum of Science and Industry (MOSI), to examine the myths and legends of what is arguably the most damaging invasive species found on UK shores.

    It will feature a number of discussions, question and answer sessions and presentations from guest speakers including, the founder and Chief Executive of JKSL, Mike Clough, Professor John Moverley OBE from the Amenity Forum, Richard Shaw of CABI, Rob Simpson of BASIS, and Derek Smith of Ragwort UK. It will also introduce Mesh Tech as a brand, focuses on a cleaner, greener, meaner method of eradication. The new technique does not involve chemicals but instead uses the plants aggressive nature against itself. Initial trials have proved the method successful and it is an ideal technique for use on riverside locations, railway embankments and highways. http://www.jksl.com/other-treatments.htm

    Controlling Japanese Knotweed costs the UK economy more than £150m every year – and now some mortgage lenders are apparently refusing to lend where Japanese Knotweed is found.

    ‘Invasive Plants – Myths and Legends’, on 22 May 2013 at MOSI, will run from 9.30am until 5pm, and includes morning refreshments, lunch and free parking. Due to the high level of interest expected, places are limited and will be issued on a first-come, first-served basis. For further information about the seminar and Japanese Knotweed Solutions Limited, please visit the website - www.jksl.com - or call 0333 920 1302.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMay 1st 2013
     
    Manchester, I only have to look out the window to see some (actually a bit late this year).
    Get them to come down here and eradicate it, I am tired of cutting down and taking it to the municipal tip to be turned into compost.
    • CommentAuthorCharli
    • CommentTimeMay 1st 2013
     
    I have a garden full of it... impossible to eradicate as its coming over the boundary from the local Primary School- who are unwilling to do anything about it. If they attempt to remove it but inadvertantly spread it my land- then the law can do something about it, but if they just leave it to spread then there's nothing I can do.

    Next doors chickens don't seem to mind eating it.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMay 1st 2013
     
    I better get chickens too. Mine comes from the neighbours place, he has tried to get rid of it, but is coming though the tarmac now.
    There is a site near here that was cleared of it for new housing, within a month is was sprouting again. Being Cornwall I suspect they just shipped in new earth from the other side of town where they were building.
    • CommentAuthorCharli
    • CommentTimeMay 1st 2013
     
    Apparently it tastes a bit like mild rhubarb- I was told this by someone who made some form of apple and knotweed pie with it- not by the chickens. Honest.
    • CommentAuthorborpin
    • CommentTimeMay 1st 2013 edited
     
    Posted By: SteamyTeaI am tired of cutting down and taking it to the municipal tip to be turned into compost.
    Thought is was a notifiable plant that *must not* go into compost/recycling (as it just spreads).

    Just checked and yes it is controlled waste in E&W http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/homeandleisure/wildlife/130079.aspx
    • CommentAuthorborpin
    • CommentTimeMay 1st 2013
     
    When SBK was a proper herbicide it controlled it quite nicely. Now it has all the useful ingredients removed it is not as much use as it was. :cry:
    • CommentAuthorpmusgrove
    • CommentTimeMay 1st 2013
     
    How about pigs. They seem to do a good job on reducing everything else to a mud pile so presumably Knot Weed will like ice cream to them. Easy to keep, 12 weeks on the job and then into the freezer.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMay 2nd 2013 edited
     
    Posted By: CharliI have a garden full of it... impossible to eradicate as its coming over the boundary from the local Primary School- who are unwilling to do anything about it. If they attempt to remove it but inadvertantly spread it my land- then the law can do something about it, but if they just leave it to spread then there's nothing I can do.

    That sounds like the sort of PC nonsense that abounds - like clearing your drive of snow. Perhaps HSE would be interested? :devil:

    According to the link borpin listed, you could try taking them to court for causing a nuisance.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMay 2nd 2013
     
    Ryland v Fletcher, escape of a dangerous thing. Classic case.
  1.  
    I had knot weed - not any more. Six consecutive years of pouring neat Roundup down the stems was it's undoing, no quick fixes unless you have £££££s.
  2.  
    It is a controlled plant, and you can phone 999 and inform the wildlife officer if someone is strimming it or doing anything else that spreads the plant. The schools lack of action is not illegal but it's an interesting case as it will continue to grow and thus spread onto your land - possible grounds for legal action! If it was just spreading on their land then there is nothing you could do - it's only illegal if an active action results in it being spread.

    CUT IT!
    BURN IT!
    REPEAT!

    the only thing you can do.....
    • CommentAuthorEd Davies
    • CommentTimeMay 2nd 2013 edited
     
    Well, you can nuke it from orbit… :bigsmile:

    Slightly more seriously, reading above about taking it to the municipal compost site had me a bit worried. They're supposed to kill any seeds in the but it's hard to be sure. According to Wikipedia, though, it's probably illegal:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_knotweed#Invasive_species

    “It is also classed as "controlled waste" in Britain under part 2 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990. This requires disposal at licensed landfill sites.”
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMay 3rd 2013
     
    Posted By: SteamyTeaI am tired of cutting down and taking it to the municipal tip to be turned into compost.


    Posted By: Ed DaviesSlightly more seriously, reading above about taking it to the municipal compost site had me a bit worried.
    Was being facetious.

    But my neighbours cut it down for years and carted it off as they did not know what it was.
    I use Roundup on it.
  3.  
    You don't have to worry about seeds as ALL the Knotweed plants in the UK are a single sex (can't remember whether male or female) but anyway there is only one so they can't be fertilized - bit of a relief I suppose!
    • CommentAuthorCharli
    • CommentTimeMay 3rd 2013
     
    Posted By: djh
    That sounds like the sort of PC nonsense that abounds - like clearing your drive of snow. Perhaps HSE would be interested?img>

    According to the link borpin listed, you could try taking them to court for causing a nuisance.

    Have found it very difficult to find anyone who is interested- have spent 8 months chasing two councils (the council the land is actually in, plus the seperate council that owns the school), as well the the Headmistress of the school and the schools caretaking team, got the Wildlife Trust round too, as well as several Knotweed-exterminator type companies. The school don't care to do anything. And I can try taking them to court- but thats really expensive and there's no guarantee I will win. Or that even if I do win, they'll actually do anything. Anything my side of the fence gets round-upped (neat roundup poured injected into the stems)(anything I miss next doors escaped chickens seem to eat), but the school have expressly forbid me from going on their land- so nothing I can do about the massive infestation the other side of the fence! Its all joyous fun.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMay 3rd 2013 edited
     
    Down here you could report to the council any knotweed on council controlled land and they dealt with it, was a £20m project to eradicate it.
    Was a waste of £20m
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMay 4th 2013
     
    Posted By: CharliHave found it very difficult to find anyone who is interested- have spent 8 months chasing two councils (the council the land is actually in, plus the seperate council that owns the school)

    Which councils are they?
  4.  
    People : don't use chemicals in your garden and certainly not general herbicides like round up!

    CUT IT!
    BURN IT!
    REPEAT!

    admittedly there is no cure if the school does bugger all - maybe climb over the fence at night or inform them in writing that you will be coming on to school grounds to deal with it - they will then be obliged to respond in writing and then send this to the press. Chances are there's nothing you can do - maybe dig a vast hole so that the offending weed falls into your garden !! It's a bit like picking up my neighbours cats mess every day - unless I get an large air rifle or a dog, I can't do anything legal....
    •  
      CommentAuthorjoe90
    • CommentTimeMay 4th 2013 edited
     
    Charli, Just read this:-- "You can also be held liable for costs incurred from the spread of Knotweed into adjacent properties"

    from:-
    http://www.devon.gov.uk/index/environmentplanning/natural_environment/biodiversity/japanese_knotweed/whats_the_problem/jk_and_the_law.htm
    • CommentAuthorTriassic
    • CommentTimeMay 5th 2013 edited
     
    I once worked for a large company and we had 5 large stands of Knotweed on farm land, one of which had stared to encroach onto a neighbours garden. The owner wrote asking us to take action, the upshot was that our legal team suggested we take action, as we did not have any defence if the house owner took legal action. It took about 5 years of spraying to kill it of. Oh and it is an offence to spread the stuff, so no putting it in the composting bin or the council skip.

    There was some talk of introducing a natural predator in a bid to eradicated this invasive weed, not sure where the powers that be are up to on that one?

    The Environmnt Agency page on Japanese Knotweed is here, interestingly there is an App to use to report it, so this maybe a good starting point in getting it flagged up with the EA and it may also be worth getting the EA inspector involved as the school needs to be more proactive in the management of this weed.
    http://environment-agency.resultspage.com/search?p=Q&ts=ev2&w=knotweed&x=11&y=6
    • CommentAuthorseascape
    • CommentTimeMay 5th 2013
     
    I think they tried spraying it with sea water somewhere too.
  5.  
    seascape - wasn't that Triffids?
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMay 5th 2013 edited
     
    Triffids were not real, like Santa Claus and Fairies, now Piskeys are are different.

    Would have awaken the Kraken anyway, then we would be in trouble.
    • CommentAuthorCharli
    • CommentTimeMay 5th 2013
     
    Posted By: djh
    Which councils are they?


    I live in the district of Amber Valley Council, but the school is ran by Derbyshire County Council.

    Have now drafted another letter to them (I like to get everything in writing-with dates on and recorded delivery and stuff), mentioning all the useful stuff you've told me! Will see what form of reply I get!

    Thanks
    • CommentAuthorGotanewlife
    • CommentTimeMay 5th 2013 edited
     
    You'll find it listed here under the World's Worst Invasive Alien Species; there are about a dozen shrubs listed along with mosquitoes, grey squirrels, pigs, cats, goats, Fox, Avian Malaria, trout....you get the picture - quite an eye-opener! 'Man' isn't listed though......

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_the_world%27s_100_worst_invasive_species
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMay 6th 2013
     
    Rainbow and Brown Trout, and cats, can't we put the two together.
    Should have dogs, the ones that are banned from the beach between Easter and 1st October.
  6.  
    ''Rainbow and Brown Trout, and cats, can't we put the two together.''

    As ever, I wish I could draw!

    Wonderful mental images of shoals of cats returning up-river to their spawning grounds, and trout sleeping lazily on top of the boiler.....
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMay 6th 2013
     
    :cool:
    • CommentAuthorrhamdu
    • CommentTimeMay 7th 2013
     
    It seems a shame not to compost all that juicy knotweed.

    How about shredding it before composting? How small is the smallest viable fragment?

    Does it survive if sun-dried, like hay?

    If not 100% confident - how about storing the compost for an extra year, then forking it over to check for any developing knotweed plants?
   
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