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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
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    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMay 7th 2013
     
    Posted By: rhamduHow small is the smallest viable fragment?
    Been told 6mm is enough, I can get you a small piece if you want to try it out :wink:
    • CommentAuthorskyewright
    • CommentTimeMay 7th 2013 edited
     
    Posted By: rhamduHow small is the smallest viable fragment?

    http://www.gardenorganic.org.uk/organicweeds/weed_information/weed.php?id=11
    states:
    "Small fragments of stem of the size produced by a horticultural shredder will regrow and form new plants"

    I don't think many people would be keen on experimenting at anything beyond laboratory scale on just how small you could get away with! It would only take one slightly bigger bit to get past the system...
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMay 7th 2013
     
    Is Skye free of it?
    Really is a menace down here. Don't think that there is anythign special about the SW, just that it is brighter, warmer and wetter, so most plants grow well here.
    • CommentAuthorGotanewlife
    • CommentTimeMay 7th 2013 edited
     
    Posted By: SteamyTeaI can get you a small piece if you want to try it out

    You'll go to Jail!
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMay 7th 2013
     
    Posted By: GotanewlifeYou'll go to Jail!
    Just starting to apply for a license to sell a specimen that I am legally allowed to own, allowed to give away, allowed to throw away, but to sell it I need a special license.
  1.  
    Posted By: SteamyTeaIs Skye free of it?

    Not free. :sad:

    The nearest stand to us is only 200m away. I was pretty nervous when that house was involved in some fairly major earth moving a few years ago. Mainly it was a matter of bringing in fill from a nearby ad-hoc quarry, but it wouldn't have taken much for an 'infected' lump of mud to get stuck in a tractor or trailer tyre on its way back to the quarry and get carried along the road.

    A friend up in Broadford has to fend off a whole uncontrolled garden of it next door.

    Don't think that there is anythign special about the SW, just that it is brighter, warmer and wetter, so most plants grow well here.

    It does just fine here! We don't do the peaks of heat that you might see, but we don't get really cold either.
  2.  
    I seem to remember the EA saying that a 5mm fragment was viable. If you were to compost it you'd have to autoclave it first else it'll just grow nicely out of the compost - my neighbour did it, much to my horror.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMay 7th 2013 edited
     
    A portrait of Philip Seibold - the man who introduced Japanese knotweed to Europe.

    The Cornwall Knotweed Forum supplied the images. Bet it is more popular than the Cornwall Liberation Front
    • CommentAuthorrhamdu
    • CommentTimeMay 7th 2013
     
    Posted By: skyewright"Small fragments of stem of the size produced by a horticultural shredder will regrow and form new plants"
    I wonder if it would survive one of those shredders which crushes the plants rather than chopping them?

    Oh, and what about the story that municipal composters generate a high enough temperature to kill pathogens and weeds? JKN isn't unique. Thistles and bindweed regenerate from small fragments, but nobody seems to worry about taking them to the tip, along with plants infested with viruses, fungi and insect pests.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMay 7th 2013
     
    Just read somewhere that 0.7g is enough to get it started and it can lay dormant for 4 years.
    Do thistles destroy buildings?
    • CommentAuthorCharli
    • CommentTimeMay 7th 2013
     
    I have some sun-dried knotweed that was cut down about 7 months ago, on a tarp in the shed- I never got round to burning it. Have now put a section in a planter.. will see if it grows..
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMay 7th 2013
     
    Posted By: Charliwill see if it grows
    Good man.
  3.  
    What is the problem

    Excellent biomass plant

    Can also produce a very useful drug.

    http://botanicalmusings.blogspot.co.uk/2012/10/resveratrol-miracle-drug-from-japanese.html
    • CommentAuthorrhamdu
    • CommentTimeMay 8th 2013
     
    Posted By: renewablejohnCan also produce a very useful drug.
    Some people prefer to get their resveratrol from red wine.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMay 8th 2013
     
    "If current medical uses weren't enough"

    But from reading that article most benefits are unproven, with one discredited. No human trials and it tastes really bad.

    I think the reason it is not used as a bio-mass crop is that it is not very dense, or has a low J/m^2 compared to other crops.

    But if anyone is interested don the Cornwall Council website there is an interactive map where you can go get some, bit just up the road from me, shall check it out later, after I have seen how my neighbours crop is getting on.
    • CommentAuthorTriassic
    • CommentTimeMay 8th 2013
     
    Arguably its a private nuisance so would be actionable (i.e. you can sue the school for the costs of dealing with it and should write to them making clear that you will do so).

    There is a breakdown of the position here which is worth an initial look: http://www.cornwall.gov.uk/default.aspx?page=19756
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMay 8th 2013
     
    So good to see Ryland v Fletcher quoted, makes me feel I did not waste my law lessons and college.

    Cornwall does seem to take this menace seriously, may print that off and pop it though the neighbours letterbox. Not forgiven him for having a bonfire when my washing was out and on the shared tarmac parking area.
    I am sure from the Latin name Fallopia Japonica I can make a much shorter description, maybe 3, 4 letter words :bigsmile:
    • CommentAuthorCharli
    • CommentTimeMay 8th 2013
     
    Posted By: SteamyTea
    Posted By: Charliwill see if it grows
    Good man.


    I don't pretend that this is scientific, it just gives me something to do!
  4.  
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMay 8th 2013
     
    Posted By: renewablejohnHeres the biomass potential


    :bigsmile: :bigsmile: Very good! "When's the biomass potential" might be a more apt caption :bigsmile::bigsmile:
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMay 8th 2013
     
    John,
    Did you read it all.

    "Tags: April Fools' Day, biomass, energy source, Japanese knotweed, resveratrol":bigsmile:
    • CommentAuthorRobinB
    • CommentTimeMay 8th 2013
     
    Posted By: SteamyTeait tastes really bad.
    Did you cook it first?
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMay 8th 2013 edited
     
    Boiled for a week, and it still came back to life, you know the film Alien, well it is like the blood that burnt though floors of the Nostromo.
  5.  
    <blockquote><cite>Posted By: SteamyTea</cite>John,
    Did you read it all.

    "Tags: April Fools' Day, biomass, energy source, Japanese knotweed, resveratrol"<img src="/forum114/extensions/Vanillacons/smilies/standard/bigsmile.gif" alt=":bigsmile:" title=":bigsmile:"></img></blockquote>

    Sorry it was my dry sense of humour. It was quite a famous April Fool at the time.
    • CommentAuthorTriassic
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2013 edited
     
    The rhizome system beneath a stand of Japanese knotweed can be over 4 metres deep and could extend for at least 7 metres around the stand.

    https://www.gov.uk/japanese-knotweed-giant-hogweed-and-other-invasive-plants

    So if you intend to sell your house you may find that it is - unmortgageable.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/money/2012/sep/08/japanese-knotweed-house-sale
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