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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
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    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMay 6th 2013 edited
     
    Was a bit bored this morning, so decided to review my electricity prices. I am currently with EDF on a Standard Duel Rate (E7, pay when I get the quarterly bill, been caught out with Direct Debit and cost me 90 quid) contract that has served me well.
    So grabbed the current prices from uswitch and charted them as 'anomalies', so either above or below the mean price.
    There was only one real outlier, Spark Energy who charge 29.984p/kWh for the first 1752 kWh on day rate, then 25.866p/kWh, night rate being 9.717p/kWh.

    The rest that offer this tarrif are between 13.2 and 19.93p/kWh day rate, 5.5 and 7.7p/kWh, meter rental varying between 0 and 95£/year.
    Apparently Ofgem have said that supplier have to charge for meter rental, so this will change soon (was a bit on radio about it, crucifies very low users, but maybe they shoudl consider PV).

    So after charting it I think I will stay with EDF as they are bang in the middle (when sorted by day rate), along with M&S Energy and Ecotricity.
    • CommentAuthorSeret
    • CommentTimeMay 6th 2013 edited
     
    Interesting, but since the rates vary by location the chart is really only specific to folks in the southwest.

    Just from eyeballing the graph it looks like you could save money by switching to Co-Op. Substantially lower carbon too, they don't give any guarantee of fuel mix, but their latest figures show they managed to go 100% renewable for the year to March 2012. Worth a look I reckon.
  1.  
    Some good news from Ecotricity who currently track the big 5 tariffs, spoke to them recently and they have their own tariff coming out later in the year which will rival the others, it seems they are fed up with the others continuous price increases so want to offer their more competitive tariff.
  2.  
    Hi,
    The chart is interesting. But the overall cost depends on how much you use. Equipower will always have the option of no standing charge. So would be cheapest until you hit the thresh hold that bites at high usage. would be interesting to see all of the suppliers on a graph of amount used versus cost to see the cross over points. Trouble is is complicated by E7 useage as well.

    Richard
  3.  
    Interesting - we have a monopoly supplier here

    Fixed charge: Can$0.40633 per day = £94.57 / year
    1st 30kWh/day: Can$0.0532 = £0.0339 per unit
    Excess above 30kWh/day: Can$0.0751 = £0.0478p per unit

    We have no time-of-day rates, but there is a bi-energy rate where the rate is £0.028p per unit when the temperature is above -12C and £0.1355p per unit below -12C - the idea of this rate is that you use an alternative fuel for heating when it's below -12C. Usually a heatpump and gas or oil furnace combination is used.

    Paul in Montreal.
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTimeMay 6th 2013
     
    Apparently Ofgem have said that supplier have to charge for meter rental


    http://www.meteroperators.org.uk/faqs.php

    Can I own my own electricity meter?

    Yes, the requirement is enshrined in the revisions to the Electricity Act 1989, which now states: "An authorised supplier may refuse to allow one of his customers to provide a meter only if there are reasonable grounds for his refusal." Customers procuring their own meters has been normal practice for larger electricity customers operating with half hourly meters since 1994. It is becoming increasingly common for customers (generally non-domestic) who are contracting directly with a Meter Operator for the provision of a 'smart' electricity meter. Smart meters generally provide half hourly data for energy management purposes and have communications so that regular accurate meter readings can be provided to the energy supplier.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMay 6th 2013
     
    Posted By: SeretInteresting, but since the rates vary by location the chart is really only specific to folks in the southwest.
    Yes, it is rather limited, but I was a bit bored.
    When the Co-op first started I looked into it, was a lot more than I was paying at the time, was a good deal if you lived in the Midlands I seem to remember.

    Posted By: Phil.Chaddah-DukeSome good news from Ecotricity who currently track the big 5 tariffs
    Shall see what they offer when it is offered as there is a shake up going on at moment. The wise money is not to go for a fixed rate as prices are dropping.

    Posted By: HalcyonRichardBut the overall cost depends on how much you use.
    Yes, not gone as far as breaking it down for my individual usage, but when I put in the numbers on the uswitch calculator with an estimates 70% night usage (probably not far off) and my 4.5 to 5 MWh/year, EDF came out best.
    EDF have been pretty competitive over the 8 years I have been here, think only once they have been more than 10% higher than other. I never take out any 'deals', just stick with the standard tarrif (the one people are warned off for some reason), and pay quarterly after a meter misreading cost me £90 in bank charges(they tried to £2500, then £2000 and then £1000 out of my account in 3 days, never got refunded).

    Posted By: Paul in MontrealWe have no time-of-day rates, but there is a bi-energy rate where the rate is £0.028p per unit when the temperature is above -12C and £0.1355p per unit below -12C
    I like that idea, but would not work on temperature here, even coldest Yorkshire rarely gets that cold (and a good Yorkshireman would just put a jacket and cap on, then grumble, right Paul).
    We are slowly moving towards half hourly metering, though I doubt that will come in for domestic billing, we may get 4 rates during the day. But people here struggle with 2 rates. Was a bit in today's Telegraph about 30% electricity rise in the next 7 years and 100% rise by 2050, so about a 4%/year rise or 5.5p on the day rate over the next 7 years but only 1.9%/year till 2050.
    So a bit of scaremongering going on I think.
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