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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
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    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2013 edited
     
    For three or four years now we've had problems with rooks,-or a rook (?), problem there they all look the same,:bigsmile:. It, they, want to bash their brains out on the windows. A couple of the DG windows are badly and permanently scratched. This last year it's got particularly bad and usually starts at about 5 am. We guess its territorial and a result of reflection. the usual dangly shiny things or festooning the window with raptor cutouts don't seem to deter and the internet is not much help either. I remember one of my clients a few years ago, whose house was frequently the scene of thrush suicides.
    First; anyone got any bright ideas for a solution short of a shotgun.
    Second; Is the increasing useage of huge glazed areas in out homes very bad, not only from an insulation point of view, but also from a wildlife perspective?
    Third; Bit of a daft question, but are there any non reflective sealed units?

    Edit: We OWLS generally don't have a problem, being mainly nocturnal.:bigsmile::wink:
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2013 edited
     
    "Posted By: owlman</cite>Second; Is the increasing useage of huge glazed areas in out homes very bad, not only from an insulation point of view, but also from a wildlife perspective?"
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22395664
    http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/radio4/moreorless/moreorless_20130506-1200a.mp3

    Have you thought of a pet owl?
    • CommentAuthordickster
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2013
     
    We stopped cleaning the windows!
    • CommentAuthorJamster
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2013
     
    Dickster, perfect excuse!
    • CommentAuthorJonti
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2013
     
    Maybe non reflective glass or a foliar. It is illegal to shoot rooks as far as I am aware so not a good option:bigsmile:

    Another way might be to use the black mosquito netting to reduce the reflection.

    Jonti
    • CommentAuthorskyewright
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2013
     
    Posted By: owlmanFor three or four years now we've had problems with rooks,-or a rook (?), problem there they all look the same,. It, they, want to bash their brains out on the windows.

    We have occasional problems with hoodies (Hooded Crows) doing the same thing tapping on a NW facing gable end loft window. I think that reflection in the glass is part of it, but my impression is that it happens less often if I make sure there's nothing shiny in the loft in the area of the window.
    • CommentAuthorEd Davies
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2013 edited
     
    • CommentAuthordickster
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2013
     
    Seriously though...we stopped cleaning the windows and it worked! No glasskill. We went away, let our friends stay in the house. As a thank you they cleaned all those terrible dirty windows, resulting in probably a death every other day until muck built up again.
    • CommentAuthorpmusgrove
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2013
     
    Down here in Somerset the rooks are a pest but boy are they wise! You seem to be able to walk around without a gun and they totally ignore me but if you just think about getting one out of the cabinet they are off! They do make a mess of windows but my theory is that they are showing off. I have often seen a male going hammer and tongs against his reflection in a window whilst (presumably) a female walks around underneath admiring the performance; they then fly off together. We tried the usual things to scare them away but nothing really worked other than having a dog or cat in the area. The saving grace is that here it only went on for one season, the following spring the rooks were still here but not attacking the windows.
    • CommentAuthorPaul_B
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2013
     
    Interesting, I've seen or should I say heard a rook fly into a big reflective glass window at work and it made everyone jump with the huge noise. The rook killed itself and wasn't taken away until the magpies decided to feast on it some time later, at which point our facilities team decided that was a bit too much nature upfront. Apparently 100 million birds a year collide with windows in the UK of which a third die (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/3505256.stm) maybe we should ban windows instead of wind turbines ;o)
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2013
     
    There must be a way of coating glass with a non reflective surface at least in one direction. Non reflective picture glass has been used for years although that does appear to achieve it's result via a slightly abraded surface rather than a coating, I may be wrong. Exterior shutters are possibly another option.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMay 15th 2013
     
    Wish windows attracted high speed Seagulls.
  1.  
    ''Wish windows attracted high speed Seagulls.''

    Our big (1960's-style) picture window in Swansea did! I was pretty amazed it did not get broken.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMay 15th 2013
     
    Posted By: owlmanThere must be a way of coating glass with a non reflective surface at least in one direction.

    It's all possible, of course. My spectacles have anti-reflection coatings. Binoculars, cameras etc have anti-reflection coatings. I guess it is simply the cost that means windows don't.

    You can get anti-glare stick-ons for computer monitors. I just found an interesting discussion at http://www.tspinc.com/anti-glare-vs-anti-reflective/

    An external flyscreen mesh might be a reasonably cheap possibility.
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeMay 15th 2013
     
    Posted By: djh...........An external flyscreen mesh might be a reasonably cheap possibility.

    Sort of external grade mesh roller blind might do the job.
    • CommentAuthorSaint
    • CommentTimeMay 15th 2013
     
    Used to visit an office in the south of Germany regularly. Built in a very rural situation with full height glazed facades in certain sections.
    After a couple of visits I noticed a few silhouettes of birds stuck on the glass in strategic positions. When I asked the reason I was told that the life size silhouettes of these birds of prey frightened the other birds away and so prevented bird strikes on the windows. Not an ornithologist so no idea what the birds were but judging by the size they were probably hawks. Definitely not golden eagles!
    • CommentAuthorjms452
    • CommentTimeMay 16th 2013
     
    Posted By: owlmanThere must be a way of coating glass with a non reflective surface at least in one direction


    Uniform thin films tend to have a colour(s) which most people wouldn't like on windows (sometimes these are present on high performance PV too). There are a class of nano structures often known as moth eye that will do it and increase your solar gain too but as as dgh says

    Posted By: djh. I guess it is simply the cost
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeMay 16th 2013
     
    Posted By: jms452............ There are a class of nano structures often known as moth eye that will do it and increase your solar gain too but as as dgh says

    Pedhaps the future of glazing, at least for highrises and the like, is to combine it with photovoltaic; print the PV generator like wallpaper of such a material and encapsulate it and then incorporate it into sealed units. Whole walls then become generators.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMay 16th 2013
     
    • CommentAuthorJonti
    • CommentTimeMay 16th 2013
     
    Using the silhouettes of birds of prey is probably useless when it comes to crows as they will usually have a go at any hawk, kites, etc.... in an attempt to chase them off. Seems to me, having stickers of such birds on the window will be more likely to encourage crows to attack your windows than frighten them off.

    Jonti
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMay 17th 2013
     
    Quite often see the crows and magpies duelling with buzzards and seagulls down here.
    •  
      CommentAuthorjoe90
    • CommentTimeMay 17th 2013
     
    Yes, we have buzzards in the woods behind where I live and they are always being pestered by crows etc despite their being smaller.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMay 17th 2013
     
    The real nasty one is a Robin. I have been attacked by one in a shed. They can hover like a humming bird.
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeMay 17th 2013
     
    Posted By: SteamyTea...........The real nasty one is a Robin.

    Or swallows; once their chicks have hatched they'll dive bomb anything that moves in the garden especially the cat, but they also have a go at the dogs and me too, if they are feeling particularly bellicose.
    • CommentAuthorSaint
    • CommentTimeMay 18th 2013 edited
     
    Posted By: JontiUsing the silhouettes of birds of prey is probably useless when it comes to crows as they will usually have a go at any hawk, kites, etc.... in an attempt to chase them off. Seems to me, having stickers of such birds on the window will be more likely to encourage crows to attack your windows than frighten them off.

    You could be right although I didn't see piles of squashed face crows, maybe they don't get crows near the black forest...nor parakeets apparently, in fact there was a distinct lack of "this bird is extinct" evidence altogether
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