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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

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    • CommentAuthordaserra
    • CommentTimeMay 31st 2014
     
    I've found SS screws sheer easily when torquing up in hardwood decking. Seriously though, I think any builder can stretch the extra 8 bucks/box screws for SS if they wanted to. I always thought SS was weaker than normal steel for screws.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeMay 31st 2014
     
    you dont know how builders think then!
    • CommentAuthordaserra
    • CommentTimeMay 31st 2014
     
    I must be different to the others. Saying that, I am sensitive to how long things take.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMay 31st 2014
     
    Very interesting with some good news and some bad news. I know for joist hangers you must use twist nails if you want to be kosher - Jiffy specify a minimum and maximum number that can be used. The bad news is I didn't realize they could be nail gunned - I just ordered a 10 kg bag :(

    The engineer specified coach bolts to hold up the ledger beam that holds up the joists (no hangers on those joists, the joist hangers are for the roof!) so I guess they're OK in shear. He also specified screws to connect the top and bottom OSB plates of the box beams to the timber uprights. So I suppose they must be alright there too. It seems odd, because the load is a shear load but maybe all the shear is taken by friction?

    We thought about using some long screws in part of the roof but couldn't find any that had a shear rating.
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeMay 31st 2014 edited
     
    Posted By: djhmaybe all the shear is taken by friction?
    or glue?
  1.  
    If you think about it, under normal loading conditions for one end of a floor to go down the other must go up.. Friction does indeed play a part as does the support given by adjoining finishes - such as 12-15mm of render and plaster all around the perimeter below and skirting above.

    This assumes the supported joists are cut nice and snug of course
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJun 1st 2014
     
    Posted By: fostertom
    Posted By: djhmaybe all the shear is taken by friction?
    or glue?

    Nope, there's no glue. Engineers don't take glue into account for structural calcs. I have to say that if I was designing something I wanted to work, I would use glue!

    Posted By: Mike GeorgeIf you think about it, under normal loading conditions for one end of a floor to go down the other must go up..

    Not sure what you're replying to there, Mike?
  2.  
    Not replying to anything specific - just thinking aloud
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