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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

Buy individually or both books together. Delivery is free!


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    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2014
     
    We currently have a Miele "pet hair" version upright. It's 1800W but the only fault is I cant get seem to train the cat or dog to use it. Instructions lost in translation from the German canine I guess.:bigsmile:
    • CommentAuthorTriassic
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2014
     
    So get rid of the best in class and dumb down the rest ... great!

    How about banning the 5 worst performing vacuum cleaners?
    • CommentAuthorrhamdu
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2014 edited
     
    The Telegraph in 2010 reported that the EU would limit vacuum cleaners to 500 or 750W (depending on the type). The story may have been false, of course. But if true, then this proposal has been watered down greatly.
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/eu/7996383/Europe-to-cut-power-of-vacuum-cleaners-to-save-energy.html

    According to that story, Dyson vacuum cleaners are among the most efficient, and average 1.2kW.

    The Numatic Henry has a motor power of only 580W, and that machine is good enough for many professional cleaners.

    I suspect that the power consumption of domestic vacuum cleaners has crept up to 2kW and beyond, for two reasons: (1) noise reduction and (2) trying to force the air through small bags with inadequate surface area. Why are the bags so small? Well, then you buy new ones more often :devil: But in fairness the manufacturers may be shrinking the bags to produce compact, manoeuvreable and lightweight machines.

    I use a Numatic for building work. Our home machine is a Miele, smaller, quieter and using nearly four times the power. The Numatic bags are large, and heavy when full, but the motor doesn't have to work very hard to suck air through them. The bags are fairly expensive. But unless you are using the machine instead of a shovel to pick up heaps of rubble, they take quite a long time to fill up.
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeAug 26th 2014
     
    We had a white Panasonic and a broken black Panasonic. I put the hi-power bits and removeable panels from the black one into the white one - became Pandasonic.
    • CommentAuthorBeau
    • CommentTimeAug 26th 2014
     
    Posted By: fostertomWe had a white Panasonic and a broken black Panasonic. I put the hi-power bits and removeable panels from the black one into the white one - became Pandasonic.

    :cry::bigsmile:
    • CommentAuthordb8000
    • CommentTimeAug 26th 2014
     
    You must have been waiting a long time for the moment to crack that joke!
  1.  
    Perfect, I must have one for my Bamboo flooring.
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeAug 26th 2014
     
    True - at least in a place where it would be appreciated!
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeAug 26th 2014
     
    Be careful, It may try and eat it.:bigsmile:
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeAug 26th 2014
     
    Remember the Wild West panda who doesn't pay his hotel bill - Eats, Shoots and Leaves?
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeAug 26th 2014
     
    I thought that was yer average Aussie male, according to the Aussie gals I've talked to.:wink:
  2.  
    20 years ago I used to work for a small electronics company and we were contracted by a number of (nameless) vacuum cleaner manufacturers to design controllers for their vacuum cleaners. They admitted that they didn't go out of their way to design the motors efficiently as the consumer was more likely to buy a 2.0kW vacuum with an inefficient motor design versus an efficient 1.6kW vacuum with more suction power. So to some extent the 'power' of the vacuum is not that relevant, although with the online reviews available these days its more difficult for manufacturers to spoof the system by installing inefficient motors.

    My general view is that new vacuum designs will become more efficient quite quickly as a result of a move to largely battery powered cleaners. Cleaners like the recently released Bosch with an hours battery life are leading the way, and although I haven't tried one I suspect they are a lot more convenient and faster than continually plugging and unplugging a lead?
    • CommentAuthormike7
    • CommentTimeAug 26th 2014
     
    I recently bought (£26 on ebay) a Kirby Legend vacuum - it looks like the kind that you'd guess your great-grandmother might have had when the horse and cart with the vacuum engine on it stopped visiting. It weighs about 9kg, ear defenders are a must, and it would very likely suck the skin off a rhino.

    It uses about 550W.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeAug 26th 2014
     
    Did the Kirby not come with an attachment to dry your hair.
    And do all the ex Kirby salesmen now sell ASHPs?
    • CommentAuthorrhamdu
    • CommentTimeAug 27th 2014
     
    Posted By: ActivePassiveMy general view is that new vacuum designs will become more efficient quite quickly as a result of a move to largely battery powered cleaners.


    Excellent point. I think the cordless transition is very close. From 'pah, it's just a Dust Bug' to 'why on earth did your electrician put a socket on the stairs?'
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