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    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeDec 26th 2014
     
    Anyone want to put these kitchen related energy saving actions into order or add to them?

    • Only boil the amount of water that you require
    • Use cool water washing powders and low temperature washes.
    • Pre-wash rinse with cold water
    • Cover pans when cooking
    • Fill dishwasher and use short cycles when possible
    • Hang washing on a clothes line rather than using a tumble drier
    • Set fridge to 5C
    • Set freezer to between -15 and -18C ensure seals are in good condition
    • Use A or A+ rated appliances
    • Switch off appliances at the wall when not in use
    • Fit LED lighting
    • Thaw frozen food in the refrigerator
    • Don’t cook at a raging boil
    • Consider doing it by hand rather than with a machine
    • Defrost fridges and freezers when there is a build-up of frost
    • Ensure good ventilation to the backs of fridges and freezers
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeDec 26th 2014 edited
     
    • Hang washing on a clothes line rather than using a tumble drier
    • Only boil the amount of water that you require
    • Cover pans when cooking
    • Don’t cook at a raging boil
    • Use cool water washing powders and low temperature washes.
    • Pre-wash rinse with cold water
    • Defrost fridges and freezers when there is a build-up of frost
    • Ensure good ventilation to the backs of fridges and freezers
    • Use A or A+ rated appliances
    • Set fridge to 5C
    • Set freezer to between -15 and -18C ensure seals are in good condition
    • Fill dishwasher and use short cycles when possible
    • Consider doing it by hand rather than with a machine
    • Thaw frozen food in the refrigerator
    • Fit LED lighting
    • Switch off appliances at the wall when not in use


    I would add Induction Hobs and buying food stuffs little and often to save waste. Only if you do not have to go out of your way though, my 'corner shop' is a 24/7 Tesco, so easy for me.
    You could also look at the energy content of food and how much energy it takes to process it.
  1.  
    Hi,
    Good list. I think everyone could save a lot by doing an energy audit. I have managed to get my electrical consumption down from 14 kwh/day to 5 kwh/day. Mainly by replacing old worn out appliances with the best energy efficient ones that are not silly money. Years ago I went from a desktop to a laptop (150 w to 30 w). My laptop gave up the ghost and I tried to repair but to no avail. New more powerful laptop with better screen is now 15 w. This is 50% of the old one.(used 10 + hours/day). My partner browses the internet a lot for our business. For Christmas I bought her a tablet. This charges with .05 kwh i.e. 50 wh and lasts days. It switches on/off instantly and from what I can work out probably uses a few watts. This is a reduction of probably 95% of her laptop. Another big one as mentioned above was a large fridge freezer (we store a lot of home veg/cooking) The one I bought averages 1kwh/day (50% of old 15 year old one). So a good idea if you are buying new goods is to cost in energy consumption (my fridge freezer will have paid for itself over about 8 years ).

    Richard
    • CommentAuthormarktime
    • CommentTimeDec 26th 2014
     
    That's pretty good Richard. I've got ours down to 6,7 kWh/day average for 2014 but we heat DHW twice a day with a 1.5 kW element so I imagine we are on a par with your consumption.

    As a corollary to kitchen use I'd add bathroom use and suggest changing baths to showers and educate users by having a max 30 l source of hot water. 20 l/min showers are sacrilege and power showers should be banned outright.
  2.  
    Hi,
    Yes very good. DHW is an energy biggie. I have a gas combi but we are not big hot water users any way. One thing I did a long time ago was to change from an electrical kettle to a gas one with a whistle. Obviously this cuts electrical consumption but adds to gas consumption. Not sure on the overall greeness of that.

    Richard
    • CommentAuthorringi
    • CommentTimeDec 26th 2014
     
    Is it reasonable to get a new fridge freezer just to save energy when the payback is 8 years and you don't know how long it will last.....
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeDec 26th 2014
     
    Going off subject here so might start a new thread, but where does all the energy from hot water go? Think carefully.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeDec 26th 2014
     
    Posted By: tonybut where does all the energy from hot water go?
    A fair bit possibly goes to heating up the person, some will go to heating the house. But most goes down the plughole.
  3.  
    Hi Ringi,
    I would never replace seviceable stuff unless it was a real gas guzzler. The old fridge freezer was 1/2 the size of the new one and used twice as much power(and it was over 15 years old needing lots of defrosting). The new one also enables me to store our own produce a real bonus for us and means the real payback in reality is a couple of years. So I would say more than reasonable and definately not just to save energy. I look on the long term impact - better than any pension contribution I can think of.

    Richard
    • CommentAuthormarkocosic
    • CommentTimeDec 26th 2014
     
    Don't pre-rinse in cold; just bang the dishes in the dishwasher and let the enzymes do their work.
    It's A+++ these days, rather than A or A+ for appliances
    Avoid cooking; eat raw foods.
    Avoid boiling things, ovens, and slow cookers. (shallow frying, steaming, and microwaves are most efficient)
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeDec 26th 2014
     
    If your making mashed potato, or any other mash, chop the veg up into tiny bits and poor boiling water over them, then simmer for a few minutes, no need to be 'Scottish' about it.
    We tend to overcook food in the UK.

    If you use an oven, you don't have to wait for it to warm up for some things, just give them an extra few minutes. An example of this is a Pizza. Takes about 15 minutes to heat my oven up, then the pizza is in for 8 minutes, so 23 minutes in all. Or just put it in cold for 16 minutes.

    I have a feeling that the 'A' rating of an appliance is a rolling average, so this years A++ is better than last years, or something just as confusing.
    • CommentAuthorCerisy
    • CommentTimeDec 26th 2014
     
    One aspect of "where does all the hot water go" is cooking. We do lots of entertaining and will need to keep any hot water used and allow it to cool (covered if the extra moisture causes problems!). This will be particularly important with water used for cooking vegetables, etc. Got to keep that heat in!
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeDec 26th 2014
     
    I think that the majority of the heat in hot water finishes up in the house even shower water goes out of the house at close to indoor temperature. We leave water in sink bath pans to coo down so waste as little as possible.
  4.  
    I recently saw a fridge (Samsung?) with a double door. The idea being that you keep all of the items you use regularly in what we'd traditionally think of as the fridge door. There was then a glass screen in front of the shelves which you would open much less frequently to access the rarely used items.

    I thought it looked like a good idea and made me wonder why more manufacturers don't do this.
    • CommentAuthorsquirrel
    • CommentTimeDec 27th 2014 edited
     
    Don't put things in the fridge that don't need to go there (like preserves, bread, potatoes, eggs...), so you can have a smaller fridge. Use fresh food instead of frozen - this might not save you energy, but along the whole production and transport chain.

    Have a larder at lower temperature (easy most time of the year in the UK), or reduce room temperature in your kitchen (if you have a separate kitchen). Easy for me with my non-insulated kitchen (usually at 16-18°C), but what do people with super insulated houses do?

    Oh, and something basic for the list in the OP: Use a washing-up bowl or a plug - don't wash up under running water.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2014
     
    Latest version -- intended for a sustainability website

    • Hang washing on a clothes line rather than using a tumble drier.
    • Only boil the amount of water that you require.
    • Cover pans when cooking.
    • Don’t cook at a raging boil; cut food into smaller pieces.
    • Use cool water washing powders and low temperature washes.
    • Reheat or cook from cold rather than waiting for the oven to warm up.
    • Pre-wash rinse with cold water.
    • Use a washing up bowl or a plug do not wash up under running water.
    • Defrost fridges and freezers when there is a build-up of frost.
    • Ensure good ventilation to the backs of fridges and freezers.
    • Use A+++ rated appliances.
    • Set fridge to 5C.
    • Set freezer to between -15 and -18C ensure seals are in good condition.
    • Fill dishwasher and use short cycles when possible.
    • Thaw frozen food in the refrigerator.
    • Consider doing things by hand rather than with a machine.
    • Fit LED lighting.
    • Switch off appliances at the wall when not in use.
    • Use induction hob.
    • Use microwave in preference to oven where and when possible.
    • Use fresh food and buy in smaller quantities more regularly.


    Any more? or any that need to be deleted from the list?
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2014
     
    • CommentAuthorbxman
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2014 edited
     
    use a Wonderbag

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wonderbag

    Or if you are appalled at the price like me.
    Use a sleeping bag.
    carefully wrap your saucepan in mult-layers after bringing to the boil .
    truly amazing boiling saucepan on induction cooker only took 10 seconds to bring back to a rolling boil after 45 min sleep (2.5 Kg) cannot have lost more than a couple of deg temp over that period of time .
    In fact both potatoes & carrots were cooked and did not actually need that extra boost .

    Another bonus is a major reduction of water vapor into the house which has I am glad to say virtually eliminated condensation this year even with old standard D/G. I know , I now have a much more stable temperatures thanks to EWI. But how nice to have dry windows in the morning .
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2014
     
    You can use a Thermos Flask to cook rice and pasta in. Just remember to shake it often and it takes a bit longer.
    Most rice only takes 3 to 6 minutes to cook, pasta less than 10.

    One area of catering is the waste, especially container waste. I generate about 3 kg a month of glass waste alone. Trouble is I cannot get a suitable alternative in a cardboard container.
    When thinking about waste, pre-made food is often good as near enough everything is edible, and 'back at the factory' they use the bits we hate for other foods (lips, teats and testicles), the bone is ground up for fertiliser and when there is nothing but a grey sludge left, that is put in the bio-digester and turned into gas.

    You can use every part of a pig, except the squeak.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2014
     
    Sounds just like my hay box!
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2014
     
    Works the same way, but does not take up much room, does not smell, easy to clean and is not itchy.
    • CommentAuthormarkocosic
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2014
     
    Shopping little and often only works if you're walking or cycling of course. Don't encourage Mrs Waitrose to take the Range Rover down every day - better to stock the fridge well.

    New A+++ fridge with humidity controlled veg zones, cooler meat zones, warmer dairy zones, and fan assisted circulation is worth having not just for energy saving but for food saving: you'll get an easy double the shelf life I used to with an old school fridge.


    Deleting from the list?

    Make it clear that "do it by hand" does NOT apply to washing up. I'm also worried that this:
    "Use a washing up bowl or a plug do not wash up under running water."
    Suggests that it's ok to wash up by hand. NEVER wash up by hand unless it's unavoidable. When you have to swill cool water around a warm pan with some fairy liquid and leave to soak. There is no place for a bowl or a plug in an energy efficient kitchen.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2014 edited
     
    Posted By: markocosicShopping little and often only works if you're walking or cycling of course.
    Yes, I did put that caveat in. Or passing the store anyway. My 'corner shop' is a large Tesco, the other one is a Morrisons and I think there is a Lidl too.

    Posted By: markocosicMake it clear that "do it by hand" does NOT apply to washing up.
    This is a tricky one. If the amount of washing up is set by what can go in to fill a dish washer up, then it may be correct. Certainly is not for two mugs, a teaspoon, knife and a side plate, or my typical breakfast 'mess'.
    So really down to lifestyle and occupancy. Also it should be assumed that when washing up by hand that it is done in the most efficient manner, not the least efficient i.e. start with the clean stuff and work to the dirty stuff. Too often I have seen glasses washed up after greasy pans.
    • CommentAuthorsquirrel
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2014
     
    Posted By: markocosic
    Make it clear that "do it by hand" does NOT apply to washing up. I'm also worried that this:
    "Use a washing up bowl or a plug do not wash up under running water."
    Suggests that it's ok to wash up by hand. NEVER wash up by hand unless it's unavoidable. When you have to swill cool water around a warm pan with some fairy liquid and leave to soak. There is no place for a bowl or a plug in an energy efficient kitchen.


    Depends on the size of the household, and to a lesser degree on the size of the kitchen and house. If I had space for 90 plates and cups, I'd get a dishwasher and use it every three months.

    I'm more worried by the pre-rinse suggestion in the list.


    To be honest, I do wash under running water if it's only a cup or a plate - I have a bowl in my sink and it catches less water during this time than I would use to wash the same thing in the bowl.



    With a lot of these things, it comes down to circumstances and personal decisions. How big is your family, what do they eat, how efficient is your house, where is the nearest shop, do you grow your own food... The key really is for me to enable people to think about what they're doing and make a good choice. There is no one-size-fits-all rule about how to do your washing up for example.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2014
     
    Posted By: squirrelThere is no one-size-fits-all rule about how to do your washing up for example.
    There should be, if you had seen how some of the morons I have worked with in a kitchen do the washing up :devil:
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2014
     
    what if you don't have a dishwasher?
  5.  
    Given the '*don't* do it by hand' discussion above, I think you have to take your washing-up round to the neighbours, or driver it round to the in-laws, or something.:bigsmile:
    • CommentAuthorsquirrel
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2014 edited
     
    Posted By: SteamyTea
    Posted By: squirrelThere is no one-size-fits-all rule about how to do your washing up for example.
    There should be, if you had seen how some of the morons I have worked with in a kitchen do the washing up :devil:


    I had a housemate who spend about 2 hours doing the dishes with running water and a ton of washing-up liquid. I told him to do it with a sink full of water instead and he was surprised and said he's never seen that before. He was 25.



    Maybe we should all eat in communal kitchens, it makes the cooking and washing up more efficient. :wink:
    • CommentAuthormarkocosic
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2014
     
    "What if you don't have a dishwasher?"

    Buy one, plus a cupboard's worth of mugs/plates/knives/forks/glasses to match, and wash once a week rather than daily?


    If you're truly the opposite extreme (batchelor in a flat) then the soviet approach might justify washing up by hand: Kitchens in the former USSR are tiny because you'd only ever have a quick coffee or breakfast there: cooking is far more efficient when done communally and they'd all be so rich under the communist system that they'd always eat in restaurants. They were only half wrong...


    I'd absolutely LOVE communal dishwashers and laundries. Glorified electric milk float full of maids. They do your laundry; clean your dishes; tidy the house. Done properly (en-masse) there are definite economies of scale; certainly for clothes if not dishes so I'd say you're onto something Nick; a hybrid of the USSr's restaurant vision and the Englishman's home is his castle. ;-)


    4 houses/day; £50/house; £1000/week gross: not bad given the skillset and equipment required.


    Alas the tax system is designed to create unemployment/discourage such services: you could pay me £5 to clean your can and I could pay you £5 to do my laundry in an ideal world, but seeing as you'd need to earn £20 to pay me £10 and HMRC £10 in order that I get £5 in my pocket after HMRC have taken their £5, it ceases being viable. (20% is about the limit on marginal income tax before you destroy all exchanges of services in this manner; 10% is fine)


    Agreed on pre-rinse. I *never* pre rinse and only need to pull bones/plastic/foil out of the dishwasher strainer. Buy decent dishwasher/detergent and the enzymes will turn everything into brown goo; even the fats that "always block your drain" according to mother or grandma are happily *digested* into something less nasty for the sewers. Pre-soak occasionally by swilling water around a warm pan/tray yes, but pre-rinse no.


    Bring domestic science back to the curriculum perhaps?

    We were taught how to cook (mostly pies and cakes 'cos that's what the little old lady liked best) but never how to get red wine out of carpets, chewing gum off jackets, or shine shoes etc. That only came from parents.
    • CommentAuthormuddy
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2014
     
    A couple more for your list Tony.
    Cook for more than one meal, then you can reheat another meal quickly in the microwave.
    Use your leftovers for subsequent meals.
    A more efficient tea cosy and an insulated mug.

    I think the tea cosy/hay box has room for development so could be used for saucepans or casseroles.
    Maybe a use for multifoil?
   
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