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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
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  1.  
    Best value draught proofing for a timber door? Are brush for strips a waste of time?

    I was contemplating getting a modern composite door, but do like the original for.

    Links to products appreciated.
    • CommentAuthorgravelld
    • CommentTimeSep 25th 2015
     
    Depends on how uneven the current door is, and the nature of the current air leaks.

    I find the threshold of the door the hardest bit to treat, there's normally a recess to a rebate which makes it difficult to form a continuous seal.

    I noticed Schlegel are selling external door seals in the UK now, beforehand it seemed Stormguard had this market sewn up. The latter's products are ok but a bit pricey imo.
    • CommentAuthorgyrogear
    • CommentTimeSep 25th 2015 edited
     
    a few images here...

    http://tiny.cc/dobu4x

    gg
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeSep 25th 2015 edited
     
    Hinge side should always be easy though the vast majority of people including frame manufacturers put them in the wrong place. Use foam preferably butyl P or E ones

    Threshold with rebate clean and I use butyl but brush with poly vein in it works nice

    Most forget to do the lock zone, I like routered in nylon covered foam ones that compress on contact
  2.  
    I read 'route red' and thought ''isn't that the one that goes to East Finchley?'' ... but then I closed the space!
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeSep 25th 2015
     
    Edited route red to routered sorry
  3.  
    My door is 37" wide and has no threshold at all at the moment.

    Is there a preferred stormguard model? With link if possible? I'd prefer not to rebate the door...
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2015
     
    In or outward opening door?
  4.  
    Inward opening
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2015
     
    Try googling automatic threshold seal for various products to add to the outside face of the threshold. The difficulty is then closing the gap between that and the seal around the rest of the door. It's a lot easier if all the seals are in line.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2015
     
    I would rebate reg bottom of the door and fit a weather bar with draught seal
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2015
     
    Are these of any use?
    https://www.locksonline.com/buy/Retractable-Door-Seals-465.html

    For them to be really effective you'll need an absolutely accurate level threshold plate for them to connect with. Any mismatch between seal and plate and hence door bottom and plate is not good.
  5.  
    While I'm on the topic, I need to fit a mortice lock of some description.

    Am I better off using a standard 5 lever with escutcheon on the inside? Or getting the euro spec ones? Hoping to pick one up today in b&q or screwfix?

    Am I better off getting a deadlock or a sashlock with handle?

    There is also an existing yale night latch, worth replacing or keeping?

    Finally, vertical letterbox..... Any preference on supplier? Needs to suit a victorian door
    • CommentAuthorgravelld
    • CommentTimeOct 18th 2015
     
    Get a letter box for outside.

    Not seen a mortice lock that doesn't allow air to bellow through, even with a key in. I use blu-tak to cover the hole internally!
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeOct 18th 2015
     
    Nice locks are one hand one movement to get out, there is a new reg coming in for this soon if not here already

    When I push down on the front door handle here it disengages the deadbolt and opens the door all at once.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2015
     
    Posted By: tonyNice locks are one hand one movement to get out, there is a new reg coming in for this soon if not here already

    Not sure I understand this. Lock or latch? I can't think of any key-operated lock type except a night latch that could use a single hand movement. Is there any explanation anywhere?

    When I push down on the front door handle here it disengages the deadbolt and opens the door all at once.

    On our doors you first insert the key and turn it to unlock the mechanism. Then you press down on the handle that disengages all the latches and bolt and opens the door. Going the other way, you first close the door, then lift the handle to engage all the latches and bolt, and finally turn the key to lock the mechanism.

    Our keyhole is pretty good as regards air leakage but it's certainly a thermal bridge. Incidentally, one thing I just read said that PH certification says nothing about airtightness of doors, just their U-value, which surprised me.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2015
     
    Poor by me, predictive text problems

    You should NEVER need to use a key to get out of a house thumb turn as an option.

    I have a special mortise sash lock with key and handle on the outside, on the inside a handle and a thumb turn but the handle operates the shoot bolt and the latch allowing one hand fast simple exit.
    • CommentAuthorringi
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2015
     
    Agreed for fire, but if someone breaks into your house, they find it a lot harder to take the TV if they can’t open the front door. They are also a lot more likely to be spotted, if they have leave by the window.

    For family homes, I like to see two door locks, one that can be opened from the inside without a key, and a 2nd that needs a key to open from the inside if it is locked. The 2nd lock should not be used if anyone is in the house.
    (For a HMO, it must NOT be possible to lock someone in, therefore thumb turns should be used on all exit doors.)
    • CommentAuthorEd Davies
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2015
     
    Best I've seen for family homes is:

    Exterior - one turn anticlockwise locks, second turn fully deadlocks.

    Interior - knob turned to open normally but key needed if fully deadlocked.

    Obviously you shouldn't fully deadlock if there's anybody in the house so it's not suitable for an HMO, as Ringi points out, but for normal family use it's fine particularly if you have a spare key tucked away near the door which all the occupants know about. The key thing (if you'll pardon the wilful pun) is that when the house is unoccupied you double lock it and burglars can't break the glass then operate the knob or get in via a window and get out inconspicuously with valuables.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2015
     
    Posted By: tonyI have a special mortise sash lock with key and handle on the outside, on the inside a handle and a thumb turn but the handle operates the shoot bolt and the latch allowing one hand fast simple exit.

    Are you saying that the internal handle makes the thumb turn unnecessary? Or are you saying you can use the same hand to turn the thumb turn and then operate the handle? But you can use one hand to operate all mechanisms, apart from old-fashioned things where you need to simultaneously operate a night latch and a door handle, so I don't understand your point. Again, I'd welcome a reference that doesn't suffer from predictive text problems.
  6.  
    Can you suggest a decent sash/mortice lock then with a key for the outside but handle only for the inside?
  7.  
    I opted for a Stormguard self adhesive foam seal but it hasn't been the best.

    Why don't Schlegel do an adhesive or pin on version as they seem a better seal? And I can't router the door frame.

    Thanks
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2017
     
    Gareth, building regs were going or are going to change to require single handed operation of final exit doors in new homes.

    I bought an electric lock that unlocks worth a fingerprint reader or plip, with magnetic latch and automatic deadbolt from a lock designer and manufacturer who impressed me at ecobuild. His locks are now sold by Securefast.

    When leaving the house depressing the handle automatically and in one operation withdraws the deadbolt and latch both at once.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2017
     
    Posted By: tonyGareth, building regs were going or are going to change to require single handed operation of final exit doors in new homes.

    Hi Tony, who's Gareth?

    Once again. Do you have a reference please?

    Especially one that explains how Ed's concern from two years ago regarding breaking glass to access the thumbturn (or whatever) is addressed.
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