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    • CommentAuthorwigwam
    • CommentTimeFeb 13th 2016
     
    I know there have been a few posts on this, but just wondering if those that have had the Ventive system installed could comment on it a year or two in? We're not keen on the idea of MVHR because of the running costs and maintenance issues and are wondering about Ventive as an alternative. Any experiences gratefully received!
  1.  
    We're planning on having a system installed in a new build (Ventive S I think), but not for a few months). We'll post our experiences as soon as we have anything to report.
    • CommentAuthormarkocosic
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2016
     
    Do your ventilation needs match wind speed? If not you might want to reconsider.

    Ventive is better than nothing but will under and over ventilate as the wind speed changes. MEV gets the ventilation right but doesn't recover heat. Single room MVHR is easy. MVHR is what you really want.
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2016
     
    Posted By: ComeOnPilgrimWe're planning on having a system installed in a new build (Ventive S I think), but not for a few months). We'll post our experiences as soon as we have anything to report.
    Anything yet?
  2.  
    Imminent!
    • CommentAuthorgravelld
    • CommentTimeJan 3rd 2017
     
    ...?

    Also, can you comment on what you had to do regards wet rooms (including kitchen)?
  3.  
    Just fitting the heat exchanger into the roof, but it will be a few weeks before we get all the ducting in place and can see how it goes.

    Wet rooms are just the same. We had a bit of a struggle with the kitchen due to the layout of the house, but we may connect a duct to the cooker hood outlet so that it will push the air through a route that it will not go through buoyancy.
    • CommentAuthorgravelld
    • CommentTimeJan 3rd 2017
     
    When you refer to the layout, do you mean making sure the kitchen was next to the "chimney" for the ducting?

    Are there any wet rooms not next to the chimney?
  4.  
    Yes, basically the problem is that the kitchen is the wrong side of the stairwell for the vent. We had the vent crossing in the attic, but now we want to use the attic, the vent will be in the way, so we're looking for another solution.

    All our bathrooms are 'stacked' on top of each other, and they are all below the plant room and heat exchanger, so they all go straight up. We are using one big heat exchanger rather than individual ones.

    It occurs to me that for bathrooms, you could connect the forced air outlet to the Ventive vent meaning that it is only used when you are in the bathroom, and also the vents do not need to run vertically.
    • CommentAuthorgravelld
    • CommentTimeJan 3rd 2017
     
    Thanks. I'm struggling to imagine how it works often for retrofit, there can't be many houses with this ideal layout. Our house isn't bad, only one downstairs toilet is not close to a chimney, so maybe it is an option.

    I assume the same chimney cannot have any flues used for combustion devices e.g. a stove? I guess the heat would imbalance the ventilation flues?
  5.  
    For retrofit it works best for houses built with a chimney for every room. Then it works perfectly!

    I was thinking about a chimney heat exchanger as it would recover a lot of the heat at the point when the buoyancy is less of a problem - i.e. where the smoke is about to exit the property. I assume the reason for not doing this (at least for, e.g., a stove) is that it would be impossible to sweep the small vents in the heat exchanger to keep it free of soot. You'd have to have some sort of 'pre heat exchange' where the chimney heats up air indirectly, and then this air is passed through the heat exchange.

    But you're right, I assume it would also increase the rate of ventilation, possibly also leading to excess heat being lost unnecessarily.
    • CommentAuthorgravelld
    • CommentTimeJan 3rd 2017
     
    Sorry I've missed something - I was talking about general recommendations about colocating with a combustion flue which I assume would be disallowed.

    Are you saying the ventilation rate would be increased because the combustion for would 'drive' the other flues by heating them too? Just so I understand you.

    What about the incoming air, can it still make its way down the stack if the floor is so warm?
  6.  
    Now I'm not sure I follow. If you mean can the air share a vent with a combustion flue, then seem my answer above. In addition, yes, the extra hot air exiting the building will also suck in more fresh air, increasing the ventilation rate.

    If you mean can the Ventive heat exchanger be near a combustion flue, then you need to keep them a certain distance apart on the roof.

    Yes, the incoming air can make its way down the stack if the floor is warm. The fresh air will be cooler and heavier than the stale air, so will be heavier until it reaches the heated floor when it will be warmed up.
    • CommentAuthorgravelld
    • CommentTimeJan 5th 2017
     
    Oh dear, sorry for the confusion...

    If you mean can the air share a vent with a combustion flue, then seem my answer above. In addition, yes, the extra hot air exiting the building will also suck in more fresh air, increasing the ventilation rate.

    What do you mean by "can the air share a vent"?

    I might be misunderstanding things. I thought a chimney was used as a convenient place to route ventilation ducts through. I'm saying, can the ducts co-exist with the flue from a stove in the same chimney?

    What would be the cause of the extra hot air leaving the building? I'm imagining a room sealed stove - is the extra hot air driven simply by the stack effect?


    Yes, the incoming air can make its way down the stack if the floor is warm. The fresh air will be cooler and heavier than the stale air, so will be heavier until it reaches the heated floor when it will be warmed up.
    I'm wondering if this cold air gets heated on its way down the duct, meaning the circulation effect is lessened.
  7.  
    Posted By: gravelldOh dear, sorry for the confusion...

    If you mean can the air share a vent with a combustion flue, then seem my answer above. In addition, yes, the extra hot air exiting the building will also suck in more fresh air, increasing the ventilation rate.

    What do you mean by "can the air share a vent"?

    I might be misunderstanding things. I thought a chimney was used as a convenient place to route ventilation ducts through. I'm saying, can the ducts co-exist with the flue from a stove in the same chimney?



    - If it is big enough, I suppose it could. It would need to fulfil the usual requirements (distance to combustibles etc). The heat would not be a problem for the exhaust as it would help circulation, but it might be a problem for the fresh air, as that needs to be kept cool.



    What would be the cause of the extra hot air leaving the building? I'm imagining a room sealed stove - is the extra hot air driven simply by the stack effect?



    - Yes, the hotter the room is, the stronger the effect, and the faster the circulation (I would imagine)


    Yes, the incoming air can make its way down the stack if the floor is warm. The fresh air will be cooler and heavier than the stale air, so will be heavier until it reaches the heated floor when it will be warmed up.
    I'm wondering if this cold air gets heated on its way down the duct, meaning the circulation effect is lessened.


    It should not happen if the duct is insulated.
    • CommentAuthorgravelld
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2017
     
    Thanks!:cool:
  8.  
    I'm just resurrecting this thread as our Ventive system has been installed for some time (though not all ducts to each room are connected).

    It really is quite remarkable. Our house is not yet properly airtight (front door not yet in, 100 mm holes here and there), yet you can see / feel the circulation, even in low wind conditions. The system is supposed to take advantage of the height difference between the room outlet and the heat exchange, but even with no connection in place, you can put your hand in front of the connection point on the heat exchanger and feel the suction. For the inlet, on the ground floor, you can also feel the fresh air being blown into the house.

    It's all totally silent, with no moving parts. I'm really impressed.

    The cowl on the roof looks pretty industrial (it is the industrial version), which might not be to everyone's taste, but it fits with our house very well. It's a standard grey, but I understand that as they are turning over higher volumes, it is now possible to choose the colour to fit with your roof.
    • CommentAuthorgravelld
    • CommentTimeNov 10th 2017
     
    Thanks for the update!
  9.  
    Some challenges:
    - Large size of fresh air duct (400 mm or 2 x 250 mm). Can be difficult to route to the basement.
    - Running all exhaust ducts to the heat exchanger. Fine for our compact house, but more of a challenge if your house is larger. Apparently they are planning on having 2 heat exchangers in the future rather than one.
    - Industrial look, though apparently you can now choose the colour of your cowl to match your roof.
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