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    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeJul 22nd 2016
     
    You may have already posted it up, but do you have figures for embodied energy and CO2?
    •  
      CommentAuthorBauwer
    • CommentTimeJul 22nd 2016 edited
     
    Posted By: SteamyTeaYou may have already posted it up, but do you have figures for embodied energy and CO2?


    Thanks for your question!

    The embodied energy and the related CO2 is estimated by complex and time consuming process called LCA, life cycle analysis, typically done by environmental consultants, a technique used to assess environmental impacts associated with all the stages of a product's life. So the embodied CO2 would even consider were you get your electricity in order to produce your product, from coal burning or nuclear, and the energy and CO2 spent by suppliers of suppliers of suppliers....The problem is that there is no rigid standard on the LCA process, and the outcome is, that the numbers from one consultant, running an LCA, might be much different from another consultant, even is they asses the same manufacturer and the same product. There is lack of consistency in my view, suggest a prescriptive LCA standard needs to be in place. We've seen some companies claiming some ridiculous numbers on embodied energy...

    What is clear is that Bauwer saves hundred times more energy and CO2 emissions during his life time (50+ years) vs. the relatively small amount of energy consumed and related CO2 emitted during Perlite mining and manufacturing of Bauwer insulation. Bauwer Group is member of the Association for Environmental Conscious Buildings, please see our environmental credentials at:

    http://www.aecb.net/services-directory/profile/?pid=554

    Also Perlite is a great sustainable and Eco friendly material, known reserves of Perlite will be available for many generations. In the past 60 years less than 1% of the world’s perlite reserve was used. You could see Perlite sustainability fact sheet:

    http://bauwer.co.uk/templates/Default/images/Sustainability_Factsheet_Perlite.pdf

    We are committed to reduce our carbon footprint and energy use in every part of the Bauwer Group supply chain.


    Regards, Alexander

    PS. You could see the industrial Perlite mine on the photo below, after the reclamation, at Milos, Greece.
      Perlite.jpg
    •  
      CommentAuthorBauwer
    • CommentTimeAug 9th 2016 edited
     
    Just for your information, Bauwer product application review from an experienced customer in Dorset:

    " We have used Bauwer rendering materials externally on our 300-year-old stone plinthed cob house. Original, as built construction leads to three principal issues:

    (a) lack of thermal insulation due to the high conductive capability of the stone, this being exacerbated by thermal bridging across tie stones and earth bridges,

    (b) rising damp, and

    (c) vapour permeation from the building interior condensing at the dew-point within the wall.

    Having removed the cement render (inside and out) that the previous owners/‘builders’ had applied, we re-rendered (lime putty) both the interior walls and exterior cob ‘uppers’, and deep-pointed the outer stonework, which was so pretty we toyed (for a couple of years while doing other restorative work) with the intent of flush-pointing it and leaving it on-view. The status-quo (bare stone) is simply too cold. We wanted the walls to continue ‘breathing’, and the Bauwer ‘Light’ looks, in specification terms a very useful material: moderately good insulative properties (for what effectively is a structural-strength render) but most importantly respectable water vapour permeability: ‘breathable’. We’ve put around 50mm total render over the entire exterior stone plinth wall and two skims of ‘Finish’ with 4mm glassfibre 160g mesh. The builders (plastering experts of 50 years practice) hadn’t used the Bauwer materials before and wanted to play things safe thickness-wise; as things went on the guys quickly switched from circumspect to very ‘pro’, very much liking the easy knock-up, low density and application."
      1 before.jpg
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    •  
      CommentAuthorBauwer
    • CommentTimeAug 11th 2016 edited
     
    " We have now to finish-paint, which will be the Seciltek silicate stuff with Secitlitek primer under, as will the remainder of the cob walls, which were last limewashed around 8 years ago.

    So now we we’ll find out, over the coming winter, how much difference is actually achieved in thermal and wall dampness properties: I’m expecting the outcome to be good, as external insulation is a far superior solution (to the thermal problem of old housing stock) than internal insulation. For any building needing water vapour breathability - i.e. most over 60 years old), these lightweight permeable renders are an ideal solution. More to come."
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    •  
      CommentAuthorBauwer
    • CommentTimeAug 11th 2016 edited
     
    Dear All,

    I am pleased to announce that Eco-friendly Bauwer range of insulated renders and plasters is now available from the UK's leading PFT Central - Plasterers 1 Stop Shop:

    http://www.plasterers1stopshop.co.uk/materials-c-25.html

    Best regards,
    Alexander
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    • CommentAuthorjackcarnan
    • CommentTimeAug 30th 2016
     
    Trial of Bauwer Light in solid wall house, internal.

    Though it might be helpful to note first impressions of my own experience using Bauwer Light. My project is a 100 year old stone cottage in Western Isles that we have stripped back, removing all existing timber frame and lath & plaster - all in very poor condition.

    After lime pointing and repairing internal walls my nest step was consideration of effective insulation, especially of materials sympathetic to an old house. I am no expert but my research has convinced me that air vapor permeability is an advantage, meaning many of the current phenolic-based systems were ruled out.

    That left woodfibre batts within a frame - until I discovered Bauwer!

    For my own project it seemed well suited - it made sense to have just one physical barrier ie a well insulated wall as opposed to a cold wall, air space, woodfibre insulation, boarding then plaster. It seems over complicated for what is in the end a fairly simple task - keeping a old house warm.

    So onto the trial. We received one 25kg bag of Bauwer Light, and it was light. No small consideration when transporting lots of bags. Following instructions and the online video it matter of few minutes to mix. Application was easy with high adhesion to the wetted stone surface. The resulatant mix was very easy to work withThis the dried fully after a few days to leave a pleasantly firm textured creamy-coloured - and insulated - wall.

    Seemed to do exactly what was required in a simple, straighforward and cost-effective material.

    A successful trial and so far so good.
    • CommentAuthorsnyggapa
    • CommentTimeAug 30th 2016 edited
     
    Posted By: jackcarnan
    So onto the trial. We received one 25kg bag of Bauwer Light, and it was light.


    I can't believe that it would be any lighter than any other 25Kg bag though?

    Presumably the bag would be much bigger than say a 25Kg bag of cement - does that make it feel lighter or easier to handle? I guess it should be lighter by volume when mixed so maybe easier to move about when working with it

    -Steve
    •  
      CommentAuthorBauwer
    • CommentTimeAug 31st 2016 edited
     
    Posted By: snyggapa
    Posted By: jackcarnan
    So onto the trial. We received one 25kg bag of Bauwer Light, and it was light.


    I can't believe that it would be any lighter than any other 25Kg bag though?

    Presumably the bag would be much bigger than say a 25Kg bag of cement - does that make it feel lighter or easier to handle? I guess it should be lighter by volume when mixed so maybe easier to move about when working with it

    -Steve


    Hi Steve,
    It is 25 liters, not 25Kg, in fact it is much lighter than 25kg, so Jack is right :)

    One bag of Bauwer Light is sufficient to cover one square meter at 25mm thickness or 2.5 sqm@10mm which is times more vs traditional plaster or render.

    Bauwer Light hardened density is only 280kg/m3 vs 1,500kg/m3 of the traditional plasters and renders.


    Regards, Alexander
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    •  
      CommentAuthorBauwer
    • CommentTimeNov 14th 2016 edited
     
    We're at the Homebuilding and Renovating Show last weekend at Harrogate :)

    http://bauwer.co.uk
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    •  
      CommentAuthorBauwer
    • CommentTimeNov 14th 2016
     
    Bauwer Light application with a plastering machine:

    Vapour permeable insulation for traditional buildings, cottages with solid stone or brick wall

    https://youtu.be/mykekzbXnAw

    and manually:

    https://youtu.be/oxogp2uRgaw
    •  
      CommentAuthorBauwer
    • CommentTimeNov 17th 2016 edited
     
    Hello to Everybody,

    We are about to introduce a range of coloured mineral breathable renders, which would be available as:

    1) Top coat coloured finish over insulating and dehumidifying layer of Bauwer Light.

    2) A separate application, one-coat finish, through coloured, weather resistant and breathable decorative render. Equivalent to Monorex GM or similar and highly breathable and flexible.

    We did an application testing with our partners @Plasterers1StopShop and we liked coloured render a lot.

    White version would be shortly available with the next day delivery and competitive pricing as well.
      BGL mineral colours.jpg
      finish3.JPG
    •  
      CommentAuthorBauwer
    • CommentTimeNov 18th 2016 edited
     
    I was interested how Bauwer Light compares to similar insulating, renovating and dehumidifying renders and plasters sold in the UK. We identified several different products, manufacturers. Interestingly Limelite from Pozament, specialist construction products division of Tarmac, appeared to be of the exactly of the same composition as Bauwer Light, but almost 3 times heavier which impaired it's thermal performance. Generally speaking the lighter material is, the better thermal performance and vise versa.

    Materials list:
    http://bauwer.co.uk
    http://www.pozament.co.uk/products/limelite-renovating/
    http://www.sovchem.co.uk/renderlite-25k.html
    http://www.lime-green.co.uk/products/lime-plaster/ultra
    https://www.mikewye.co.uk/product/secil-ecocork/
    https://www.diasen.com/sp/en/p/diathonite-evolution.3sp
      Benchmark 160317.jpg
  1.  
    Diasen seem to quote the lambda value of Diathonite Evolution as 0.045W/mK, apparently quite a bit lower (better) than the other products listed in the table above.
    •  
      CommentAuthorBauwer
    • CommentTimeDec 2nd 2016
     
    >> Diasen seem to quote the lambda value of Diathonite Evolution as 0.045W/mK, apparently quite a bit lower (better) than the other products listed in the table above>>

    Hi Nick,
    Good to hear from you!

    The devil is always in the details. As you could see we ranked Diathonite with estimated thermal conductivity of 0.07 vs declared value of 0.045, there is a reason behind it.

    Basically the hardened density of insulation plaster correlates well with the thermal conductivity via so called thermal curved, please see it attached and the link below:

    http://www.hipin.eu/publication/files/EnergyAndBuilding.pdf

    The lighter the material, more air entrapped in it, therefore insulation value is better and vise versa.

    As you could see the hardened density of Bauwer Light is 280kg/m3 vs 360kg/m3 of Diathonite, which means 20%+ heavier.

    Perlite, filler of Bauwer, have a better thermal performance vs Cork, filler of Diathonite.

    As you could see from the curve it is physically not possible to achieve thermal value of 0.045 at the density of 360kg/m3. We thought Diathonite declared a thermal value of the filler, eg Cork, but not the material itself.

    Hope this clarifies the discrepancy,

    Best regards,
    Alexander
    http://bauwer.co.uk
      Thermal curve 2.jpg
    •  
      CommentAuthorBauwer
    • CommentTimeDec 2nd 2016 edited
     
    More Bauwer projects ongoing with improved living comfort and savings realized.

    Insulation and renovation render plaster you can use without having to worry about mould and trapped moisture.

    http://bauwer.co.uk
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    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeDec 3rd 2016
     
    Posted By: Bauwer>> Diasen seem to quote the lambda value of Diathonite Evolution as 0.045W/mK, apparently quite a bit lower (better) than the other products listed in the table above>>

    Hi Nick,
    Good to hear from you!

    The devil is always in the details. As you could see we ranked Diathonite with estimated thermal conductivity of 0.07 vs declared value of 0.045, there is a reason behind it.

    Basically the hardened density of insulation plaster correlates well with the thermal conductivity via so called thermal curved, please see it attached and the link below:

    http://www.hipin.eu/publication/files/EnergyAndBuilding.pdf" rel="nofollow" >http://www.hipin.eu/publication/files/EnergyAndBuilding.pdf

    The lighter the material, more air entrapped in it, therefore insulation value is better and vise versa.

    As you could see the hardened density of Bauwer Light is 280kg/m3 vs 360kg/m3 of Diathonite, which means 20%+ heavier.

    Perlite, filler of Bauwer, have a better thermal performance vs Cork, filler of Diathonite.

    As you could see from the curve it is physically not possible to achieve thermal value of 0.045 at the density of 360kg/m3. We thought Diathonite declared a thermal value of the filler, eg Cork, but not the material itself.

    Interesting. The Diathonite documentation seems to be quite clear that they are stating the value of the product, and they have detailed the test standard they measured against and have self-certified with a CE mark. So are you saying they are lying about the properties of their product?

    You may well be right; I don't know. But if you think they have made a mistake then surely the correct thing to do is to contact them and suggest they put it right? Or perhaps contact the regulatory authorities who supervise these measurements and ask them to check. But simply choosing not to accept their published figures and publish your own guess with no measurements at all does not seem very professional.
    •  
      CommentAuthorBauwer
    • CommentTimeDec 5th 2016 edited
     
    >>Interesting. The Diathonite documentation seems to be quite clear that they are stating the value of the product, and they have detailed the test standard they measured against and have self-certified with a CE mark. So are you saying they are lying about the properties of their product?

    You may well be right; I don't know. But if you think they have made a mistake then surely the correct thing to do is to contact them and suggest they put it right? Or perhaps contact the regulatory authorities who supervise these measurements and ask them to check. But simply choosing not to accept their published figures and publish your own guess with no measurements at all does not seem very professional.>>


    The thermal property is linked to the density, and in order to receive the value in the range of 0.043-0.045 you would need to have a thermal plaster density of about 110kg/m3 to 200 kg/m3. For example insulated polystyrene beads based plaster below: http://www.edilteco.com/en/downloads/download/1325/technical-data-sheet-isolteco-light-110 achieved thermal value 0.043 at 110kg/m3, but this material was difficult to use when we tried it.

    We've been asked on several occasions by our clients to have a comparison analysis of different thermal plasters renders and that's exactly what we did. Clearly it did not make sense to us to mislead customers by using clearly not correct thermal values, so we used an estimated value instead (est.) being actually on a positive side as you could see from the lambda vs. the density curve published above. I'd suggest that any technical person familiar with the thermal plasters would know the thermal performance vs the density relation very well.

    In the meanwhile we'll be contacting our Italian colleagues at Diasen as well, thanks for your feedback.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeDec 5th 2016
     
    I'd say that using anything other than a manufacturer's published and certified values without specific comment was grossly misleading at best.
    • CommentAuthordelprado
    • CommentTimeDec 7th 2016
     
    Isn't the obvious difference from that table that pretty much all of the other plasters are much much more breathable?

    Can you confirm what this product actually is - some sort of NHL base?
    •  
      CommentAuthorBauwer
    • CommentTimeDec 12th 2016 edited
     
    >> djh >> I'd say that using anything other than a manufacturer's published and certified values without specific comment was grossly misleading at best.<<

    Diathonite is declaring thermal performance of 0.045 at 360 kg/m3 density.

    This is the better performance level vs achieved by thermal plaster with 80% to 90% of aerogel in it, even at a lower density of 275-300 kg/m3 (page 11): http://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/6/9/5839

    Could you please see more on correlation between density and thermal performance of thermal plasters (thermal curve) at: http://www.hipin.eu/publication/files/EnergyAndBuilding.pdf
    You could predict thermal performance easily if you knowing density, based on above.

    Thermal conductivity of Cork is about 0.04, thermal performance of cork based material at such density should be in the range of 0.07 to 0.08 based on 360kg/m3 density and not even close to 0.045

    Aerogel based thermal plaster delivers 0.045 - 0.05 at lower density 275kg/m3 while aerogel thermally much superior to cork.

    We do not claim to be more catholic than a Pope, but we can not publish performance data which does not make sense from physics point of view. We discussed this issues with other Italian manufacturers of thermal plasters, renders and their view was consistent with ours.
    •  
      CommentAuthorBauwer
    • CommentTimeDec 12th 2016
     
    >> delprado >> Isn't the obvious difference from that table that pretty much all of the other plasters are much much more breathable? Can you confirm what this product actually is - some sort of NHL base? >>

    Hi Mate,
    Actually the lower the vapour permeability coefficient, the better the breathability :)
    The number 4 represents a highly breathable material.

    Could you please see a sample of Bauwer Light "breathing" on the recent Homebuilding and Renovating show at Harrogate back in November 2016:

    https://youtu.be/-GMWoZ6WO8E

    We simply used aquarium compressor to pressure the area below Bauwer Light and pour some water on the top. As you could see air and vapour easily passing through Bauwer Light, thanks to expanded Perlite and natural hydraulic lime. There is a small % of cement used as well, but it is not impacting vapour permeability in any way, as you could see from the video, but it helps with the application, strength and durability characteristics of Bauwer Light.

    More at http://bauwer.co.uk
    •  
      CommentAuthorBauwer
    • CommentTimeDec 14th 2016 edited
     
    Bauwer introduced a simple on-line U value calculator !

    Check your home as-built U value and look at the improvement opportunities. Available in desktop version; mobile version will be available soon.

    U-values measures how effective your walls thermally. The lower the U-value is, the better thermal property of a wall. For example typical U-value of a cavity wall (built before 1975) is 1.6 W/m²K while solid stone or brick wall is about 2.75 W/m2K.

    With Bauwer Light, your solid stone or brick wall U value could be improved by 3 to 4 times to below 0.7 W/m2K at a reasonable budget, while keeping your home breathable with no need to worry about damp, mould or trapped moisture.

    Bauwer Light is breathable insulation for traditionally built properties which installed by plasterers and renderers and available with the next day delivery across the UK and Ireland.

    http://bauwer.co.uk/Calculator.html
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    •  
      CommentAuthorBauwer
    • CommentTimeSep 12th 2017
     
    We are delighted to offer our valued customers free tickets to come and see us at the London Homebuilding & Renovating Show, stand G131. The show will be held at ExCeL, from the 22 – 24 September 2017. Our team will be on site to answer any questions you may have about our renders and insulation, and offer expert advice to assist with any projects you are working on.

    Bauwer offers highly breathable, vapour permeable insulation for traditionally built stone wall homes which require high level of breathability. Looking forward to seeing you at the show and making your project a success.
    • CommentAuthorsnyggapa
    • CommentTimeSep 12th 2017
     
    I'd be interested in your thoughts as to how "flexible" bauwer lite is compared it its lime equivalents. From my limited research your product is cement based which has a reputation for setting hard and solid whereas the others (i.e. ecocork) are lime based which traditionally tolerates movement in the building.

    Thanks

    Steve
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