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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

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    • CommentAuthortexutree
    • CommentTimeJun 19th 2016
     
    Hi All,

    I am building a single storey timber-frame outbuilding and am at the stage where I am looking at cladding. I don't want to spend too much money on this, but I'd like it to look good. I do like the look of board and batten cladding and will describe what I had in mind, as I've not done this before and am open to tips/suggestions, etc:

    Larch boards of 250mm placed along wall (onto battens underneath, which are in turn fixed to OSB sheathing) with gap of 20mm between each board. THen 60mm larch battens placed over the gaps, such that it overlaps each board underneath by 20mm each side. Fixing will be with stainless steel screws, to avoid staining and for ease of removal should it be neccessary. I may also caulk along the corners of the battens to improve weatherproofness.

    There is a good overhang from the roof above (about 40mm), which should help protect the cladding.

    I would just like to check that this plan sounds reasonable before I go out and source the timber. It seems that Cedar is usually used in board and batten, but that's a more expensive wood than larch...

    And does anyone know of a reasonably-priced supplier of larch not too far from Derby?

    I'd be very grateful for any tips or information.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeJun 19th 2016
     
    Don't caulk, use a black breather paper over the osb, possibly leave small visible gaps between the boards
    • CommentAuthorEd Davies
    • CommentTimeJun 19th 2016
     
    Will your larch boards run vertically or horizontally? I think you must mean vertically but I'm not sure.

    40 mm doesn't sound like much of an overhang. Do you mean 400 mm?
    • CommentAuthortexutree
    • CommentTimeJun 19th 2016
     
    Thanks for the replies.

    I was planning on using Tyvek Housewrap over the OSB; would this be ok as breather paper?

    The larch boards are to run vertically. The plan was that the narrower boards which are attached over the wider ones would overlap the latter by 20mm on each side.
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeJun 19th 2016
     
    This type of "hit and miss" boarding was quite popular in Scandinavia and other places. I did it about 20 years ago with rough sawn timber on an outbuilding and it's still looks fine. 20mm overhang either side is IMO a little bit light.
    It's ideal cosy bat territory which you may like, but if you do want to keep wildlife at bay, not only bats, then some form of mesh screening at the top and bottom may be wise.
    • CommentAuthortexutree
    • CommentTimeJun 19th 2016
     
    Thanks Owlman. I was thinking of putting mesh in to prevent wildlife entry. May up the overlap to 30mm if it'd be more effective...
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeJun 19th 2016
     
    Is there a reason why you only want 20mm gaps on the under boards?
    • CommentAuthortexutree
    • CommentTimeJun 19th 2016
     
    Not really, I could go with bigger gaps and use wider over boards to ensure a decent overlap. The 20mm gaps just seemed to fit with the dimensions I had in mind. (I couldn't find any 'standard' dimensions/layouts for board and batten)
  1.  
    How much roof oversail *do* you have?
    • CommentAuthorthe souter
    • CommentTimeJun 20th 2016
     
    250mm larch is pretty wide- cupping may become a problem. What thickness?
    Are you fixing your over boards with SS screws through the 20mm gap between the 250mm larch into the OSB? What thickness OSB?
    We often use Tyvek uv facade paper for cladding but as there is no shadow gap exposed this seems OTT.
    Do you mean 40mm overhang?
    Qvestions qvestions, always ze qvestions ...
    • CommentAuthortexutree
    • CommentTimeJun 20th 2016
     
    Thanks for the input! Roof overhangs by 400mm - oops, I got that wrong above! It's a monopitch roof.

    In terms of thickness I was thinking of going with around 20mm. Fixing was going to be with SS screws into 25x38mm battens attached onto 18mm OSB.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJun 20th 2016
     
    If the boards are vertical, the battens will be horizontal. Will you need counterbattens for drainage?
    • CommentAuthorEd Davies
    • CommentTimeJun 20th 2016
     
    And won't the battens need to be attached to something a bit more substantial behind the OSB?
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJun 20th 2016
     
    Posted By: Ed DaviesAnd won't the battens need to be attached to something a bit more substantial behind the OSB?

    18 mm OSB is pretty substantial. I feel sure it can carry the weight of cladding, though I can't quote any references.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeJun 20th 2016
     
    counter battens, laths or lath packers would be good though probably not needed if all gaps are covered as proposed, still dont caulk and 20mm of cover will do.
    • CommentAuthortexutree
    • CommentTimeJun 20th 2016
     
    OK, I'll avoid caulking. May consider counter battens if it would be worthwhile though.
    •  
      CommentAuthorrichy
    • CommentTimeJun 20th 2016
     
    Done some architect designed garden offices with larch cladding and basically it's only a rain screen, you want air to get in there and circulate. They had skim/plasterboard/polythene/100mm framing with kingspan/breathable plywood/breathable felt/ vertical batten/horizontal larch boards. 10 years on, no treatment, no issues.
    • CommentAuthorFred56
    • CommentTimeJun 27th 2016
     
    I recall that there is a good publication from Scottish Forestry or something like it about timber cladding. May be worth a Google. I think the recommendation for vertical cladding was vertical batten if 19mm, horizontal counter batten then the vertical cladding. The 19mm us to provide an optimum air circulation between the cladding and structure. That means it will have to have openings top and bottom.
    • CommentAuthorFred56
    • CommentTimeJun 27th 2016
     
    To be more helpful

    It's called Timber Cladding in Scotland. It's link when I first downloaded it was

    www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2002/03/15098/8744
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJun 27th 2016
     
    Simplifying the battening was one reason I went with horizontal cladding. The other reason was the ability to replace just one board if the bottom starts rotting - hopefully not since it's cedar and well clear of the ground but belt and braces ...
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeJun 27th 2016
     
    Try this house for cool vertical cladding http://www.popup-house.com/en/
    • CommentAuthorskyewright
    • CommentTimeJun 28th 2016 edited
     
    I just tried it and that 'Timber Cladding in Scotland' link still works. Here it is as a clickable link:

    http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2002/03/15098/8744
  2.  
    Thanks Keith, though I shall miss the anagrams!
  3.  
    .
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