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    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeMar 5th 2017 edited
     
    JonnyJW and tony - makes sense now, sounds gd
    But having looked at those 3 sites, am none the wiser. A plain-language description anyone?
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 6th 2017
     
    Posted By: Ed DaviesMy point, though, was that I have no idea how the harm for small particulates should be evaluated but my guess would be that just looking at the mass would be rather naïve

    Sorry for the belated response; I would guess that it's more likely to correlate better with the surface area of the particles. My guess is based on nano studies I did a few years ago - start perhaps with work by the likes of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Israelachvili if you're interested.

    But the most recent example I saw yesterday whilst doing some garden planning: https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=620 explains about the importance of surface area of particles in clay soils.
    • CommentAuthorEd Davies
    • CommentTimeMar 6th 2017
     
    Sorry, bit of topic drift resulting from exploration from my (I thought) on-topic comments but may be of general interest anyway:

    https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/579200/Emissions_airpollutants_statisticalrelease_2016_final.pdf

    (Via: https://twitter.com/Zapaman/status/838748618668523524)
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 6th 2017
     
    So the similar masses of PM10 and PM 2.5 is a bit worrying then.

    "The contribution from the category covering combustion in the residential, public, commercial & agricultural sectors has increased over recent years and peaked in 2013 at 51 kilotonnes PM 10 and 50 kilotonnes PM 2.5 . In 2014 there was reduced fuel demand in the domestic sector but consumption increased again in 2015 and estimated emissions from residential, public, commercial combustion were 48 kilotonnes for PM 10 and 47 kilotonnes for PM 2.5.Most of the emissions from residential, public, commercial combustion in these last 3 years – 79 per cent for both pollutants - are from the use of wood as a domestic fuel."
    •  
      CommentAuthorDamonHD
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2017 edited
     
    Possibly another thing to make Ed's blood boil, but I'm at this moment writing a note on how Apple* could turn their rechargeable-battery-powered products into virtual storage for the grid, and help shift demand...

    http://www.earth.org.uk/Hey-Siri-Help-Flatten-The-Duck.html

    Rgds

    Damon

    *And others, but Apple probably has the tightest control over hardware and (operating system) software together.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2017
     
    Do we really need another thing to make Apple users more smug. :wink:
    • CommentAuthorEd Davies
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2017
     
    Shaving the peak is a good thing for all sorts of reasons, I just doubt that reducing CO₂ emissions is one of them with the grid as it currently works. A bit of arithmetic on the total capacity of laptop batteries in the country (for laptops turned on in the evening) vs the amount of extra energy in the evening peak might or might not make this a bit more convincing.
    •  
      CommentAuthorDamonHD
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2017
     
    I have added a few more rough-as-a-badger's-beard numbers to the page, and I hope to speak to people who actually know some detail over the next week.

    This was merely an interesting thought that popped into my head which I wanted to write down and share.

    Partly provoked by you, Ed!

    Rgds

    Damon
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2017
     
    I quite like this thinking

    An app that prevents or delays charging during peak times would work for me.

    It is small amounts of power but in huge numbers.
    • CommentAuthorringi
    • CommentTimeMar 13th 2017
     
    At present the grid gets a lot of its stability from stored high pressure steam in large boilers (coal and nuke) driving turbines with frequency dependent regulators control the flow of the steam. We are at the risk of losing this, so require other short term (minutes) frequency dependent regulator method….

    If the grid was more self regulating on the demand site, it would be possible to put more renewable on the grid without being as concerned about how the renewable are controlled. A lot of this work is more about enabling renewable to be added to the generation mix, than it is about reducing current CO2 output, from the current generators.

    However we have lots of diesel generators that operator at the times of high peak, so reducing the highest peaks do have a direct benefit. For example a lot of hospitals are now paid to run their emergency generators at peak times, so they take less from the grid – much better for my washing machine to delay the wash.
    • CommentAuthorgoodevans
    • CommentTimeMar 13th 2017
     
    To reduce peak electricity demand - make the meters charge on an half hourly basis and force specific ratios for each half hour block on the electricity bill. If electricity was charged at 4 times the price at 6pm compared to 3pm It would not take too long for the peak usage to drop. The wholesale market works in half hour chunks, and the price variation during the day is huge - If consumers was charged close to these rates (+ profit + energy losses + fixed & small standing charge) everyone wins. All that's required is smart meters that are smart.
    • CommentAuthorEd Davies
    • CommentTimeMar 13th 2017
     
    https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/mar/13/uk-households-unnecessary-power-capacity-energy-climate-intelligence-unit-report

    “The ECIU said that reserves could be more affordably secured through energy storage, greater interconnectivity with Europe and smart technology to help reduce demand from big energy users at crunch times.”

    And (many) small users?
    •  
      CommentAuthorDamonHD
    • CommentTimeMar 13th 2017
     
    In this case, I'm hoping that Siri could help fold in some mass consumer use easily too.

    And never mind the transmission system and generation, DNOs tell me that they feel unloved and unnoticed, and they have to cope with the peaks of demand and microgen.

    Rgds

    Damon
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeMar 13th 2017
     
    From
    Posted By: Ed Davieshttps://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/mar/13/uk-households-unnecessary-power-capacity-energy-climate-intelligence-unit-report
    "The margin was 6.6% last winter, prompting a Lords committee last month to call for it to be boosted to 10%.
    The National Grid defended the reserve scheme as a cost-effective insurance policy, and added that the winters had been mild.
    But Marshall said the standby scheme was about coping during dark, windless cold snaps, so temperatures across the season were not key."
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeMar 13th 2017
     
    I don't agree that all that is needed is smart meters that are smart.

    Half hourly charging would do it on its own. Ideally coupled with smart switching on and off and this can be done by web linking without smart meters.

    IF smart meters could do smart things then I might change my mind about them.
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