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    • CommentAuthorgoodevans
    • CommentTimeMar 8th 2017
     
    My architect has suggested that it is a good idea to cover part of the exterior render with a timber cladding of some sort (he likes vertical). This is to break up the 'mass' of the front (gable) elevation to help the planners come to the correct decision. Something like 30% of the front elevation would be clad - at the moment in two parts.

    Assuming that some sort of cladding can not be avoided....

    Can I fix a thin, low maintenance, 'something' (anything wood/plank like) directly to the face of the finished render without a ventilation void behind to give the impression of cladding (but using the render behind has the weatherproof layer. The issue here I think is that the 'something' has to be vapour permeable.

    If not I suspect I will end up with the cladding being some 10's of mm proud of the render surface with battens, membranes edge details etc

    simple is good - any suggestions please (I know I have the option of telling the architect to leave the cladding off - but I'm trying to avoid making the house look like it's been designed by an engineer)
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeMar 8th 2017
     
    Maybe your architect should be told to make it look like it's been designed ... end of ... which either does or doesn't rely on stick-on anything. That it should be so optional is suspicious. Planners only seem to operate on such naff basis when offered nothing better - show them something really good and such tickbox thinking doesn't arise (usually - sometimes you'll get a determinedly rubbish Case Officer).
    • CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 8th 2017
     
    What Tom said.

    But if you do need to go that way, I imagine that you could fit any of the fibre-cement plank products directly on the render without ventilation. Normally planks have gaps between the planks that allow vapour as well as air to pass; I have no idea whether that also applies to such products. Nor do I know if there are any that pass aesthetic scrutiny.

    You don't need the render behind the cladding, of course, you could just use a membrane instead for that area. Another alternative is to step the wall, or maybe the insulation thickness, to provide visual interest and/or space to put the cladding.

    FWIW, I went with horizontal cladding because it's easier to replace one or two boards at the bottom if they ever rot. Also it means the battens are vertical and you don't need counterbattens to provide drainage.
    • CommentAuthorgoodevans
    • CommentTimeMar 8th 2017
     
    The trouble is i'm sure I'm not a good judge of 'art' - if I was to insist on an all out, minimalist 'sharp' look maybe it won't look so bad and the planners may like it - but maybe it will look as good as a standard motorway bridge. There's a fine line between minimalist and plain.

    At present the building (actually 2 buildings as my parents house will be next door and v. similar) will be simple rectangles in plan 1.5 stories with an up and over roof with no dramatic architectural features other than the 'sharp' look. This is mostly my fault - I have guided the architect quite strongly as to how I want the building to be (simple to build, easy to insulate, easy to inspect etc).
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeMar 8th 2017
     
    Posted By: djhhorizontal cladding ... means the battens are vertical
    which also means the whole can be suspended from above - see http://www.greenbuildingforum.co.uk/newforum/comments.php?DiscussionID=14944&page=1 pics of 5.3.17 - if making it super-lightweight is too difficult.
    • CommentAuthorringi
    • CommentTimeMar 8th 2017
     
    You could add a brick entry way outside of the insulation layer to keep your boots in and add shape + colour.
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeMar 8th 2017
     
    Yes, that sounds fun.
    • CommentAuthorgyrogear
    • CommentTimeMar 9th 2017
     
    If the front gable is in any way south-facing-ish, perhaps you could turn cladding to advantage and go for a transpired solar wall...

    gg
    • CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 9th 2017
     
    Posted By: fostertom
    Posted By: djhhorizontal cladding ... means the battens are vertical
    which also means the whole can be suspended from above

    Doesn't make any difference. If the cladding is vertical then the counterbattens are too ...
    • CommentAuthorgoodevans
    • CommentTimeMar 9th 2017
     
    Both front gables both face west and this is the elevation where the architect is concentrating on the look of the property - the main entrances face each other on the side of the buildings - one facing south one facing North. The windows aren't exciting (by our choice at the moment).

    Tom, I can't hear the tone of the 'that sounds fun' comment - do you mean it, was it sarcastic, do you mean it's difficult?

    Not forgetting anything outside the bungalow rectangle needs the foundations extending (clay heave/shrinkage)- it may make sense to do this between the front doors - and perhaps creating a large shared lobby/porch area in glass! Makes sense whilst my parents are with us - but with neighbours from hell not good.
    • CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 9th 2017
     
    Posted By: goodevansBoth front gables both face west and this is the elevation where the architect is concentrating on the look of the property - the main entrances face each other on the side of the buildings - one facing south one facing North.

    Posted By: goodevansit may make sense to do this between the front doors - and perhaps creating a large shared lobby/porch area in glass!

    I'm having trouble visualising the layout. It seems that if the houses are simple rectangles then the doors are as far apart as it is possible for them to be, and the space between them is filled by the houses, so the second description makes no sense?
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeMar 9th 2017
     
    Posted By: goodevansI can't hear the tone of the 'that sounds fun' comment - do you mean it, was it sarcastic, do you mean it's difficult?
    No - I just like it!
    • CommentAuthorgyrogear
    • CommentTimeMar 9th 2017
     
    Sounds like the "atrium" idea could be nice - could always be disassembled in case of need... It ought to add a *LOT* of evening heat, in winter ! Sounds like a nice place to have a tea party :smile: or to put a lounger or two and some newspapers etc.

    gg
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeMar 9th 2017
     
    Posted By: djhIf the cladding is vertical then the counterbattens are too ...
    If horizontal, doesn't need counterbattens!
    • CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 9th 2017
     
    Posted By: fostertom
    Posted By: djhIf the cladding is vertical then the counterbattens are too ...
    If horizontal, doesn't need counterbattens!

    Which is what I said. My point is that there is always a vertical set of battens or counterbattens.
    • CommentAuthorEd Davies
    • CommentTimeMar 9th 2017
     
    Right, but the OP wants thin.
    • CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 9th 2017
     
    Which is also what I addressed, but Tom set up a distracting sub-thread.
    • CommentAuthorgoodevans
    • CommentTimeMar 9th 2017 edited
     
    Posted By: djhI'm having trouble visualising the layout. It seems that if the houses are simple rectangles then the doors are as far apart as it is possible for them to be, and the space between them is filled by the houses, so the second description makes no sense?


    Ok - I have your image in my head - now swap the buildings around and the doors face each other directly (or put the doors on the oposite wall)
    • CommentAuthorgoodevans
    • CommentTimeMar 9th 2017
     
    I had a word with the architect today and we have agreed to go with no cladding - but he has been given the option to create a fancy porch between the buildings - for the moment without breaking the tea cosy on either of the buildings. (I'm thinking bus shelter !) - but I'm sure he'll come up with something else - maybe he'll have fun with some bricks.
    • CommentAuthorringi
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2017
     
    If the render the external wall insulation first, then build the self supporting fancy porch with a 10mm gap between the brickwork and the rendered external wall insulation you can then fill the gap with flexible sealant.
    • CommentAuthorgyrogear
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2017 edited
     
    Posted By: goodevansbut he has been given the option to create a fancy porch between the buildings


    delighted you went for my free and graciously offered conceptual design advice concerning the low-thermal-inertia multifunction sunspace :devil:

    hope U enjoy the experience !

    gg
    • CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2017
     
    Posted By: goodevans
    Posted By: djhI'm having trouble visualising the layout. It seems that if the houses are simple rectangles then the doors are as far apart as it is possible for them to be, and the space between them is filled by the houses, so the second description makes no sense?


    Ok - I have your image in my head - now swap the buildings around and the doors face each other directly (or put the doors on the oposite wall)

    Evidently you don't have my picture in your head! If I swap the buildings around the two doors are facing but immediately adjacent to each other. It would be simpler for you to do a drawing, I think.
    • CommentAuthorgoodevans
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2017
     
    Plan of the proposed site as requested - hope this clears up the confusion. Front doors marked by arrows
      RoughPlan.jpg
    • CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2017
     
    Ah that helps me a lot, thanks. From somewhere I had got the impression that it was a pair of semis. Obviously a mistaken impression. :shamed:
    • CommentAuthorgoodevans
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2017
     
    I definitely did not have that image in my head!
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