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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

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    • CommentAuthorDarylP
    • CommentTimeMar 21st 2017
     
    Yes, all of the above is probably true.
    However the risk (is so small) prevents Welsh Water underwriting mains-fed sprinkler systems at the time of typing...:angry:
    Hence the tsunami of Building Notices subbed just before the end of the year....:confused:
  1.  
    I'm perplexed. What exactly is the significant issue that really needs sprinklers in domestic dwellings. We've seen the number of domestic fires drop dramatically over the last 50 years (Smoking, Chip Pans, Open fires etc.). To me it all seems massively OTT. I recognise that there are no real safety downsides to sprinklers - but having the sprinklers go off in a false alarm in your house will really ruin your month (or year).

    A cost benefit analyis may well show its well over the top
    • CommentAuthorDarylP
    • CommentTimeMar 21st 2017
     
    it was pushed by a person connected to the FBU, who convinced Building Regs Advisory Committee via lobbying and other methods. All the obvious problems were raised, and rebuffed....:cry:
    Wait till the first bunch of claims hit the fan when the systems either do not perform when required, or set off for false alarms...:bigsmile:
    • CommentAuthorringi
    • CommentTimeMar 21st 2017
     
    "real" sprinklers with glass heat detectors don't set off unless it gets VERY hot. Some of the mist systems that are used instead of fire doors are connected to smoke detectors as they need to stop a fire before the smoke becomes an issue, and we all know what smoke detectors are like.
    • CommentAuthorcjard
    • CommentTimeMar 22nd 2017
     
    Because everyone wants to stick their fire oar in.. London fire brigade successfully pushed an ill thought out electrical regs change on the back of a spurious claim that lots of fires were starting in consumer units because modern electricians don't tighten terminal screws properly

    Now we have metal consumer units, full of holes that plastic wires come out of. Apparently the metal box can magically contain a fire in such situations where plastic ones could not
    • CommentAuthorgyrogear
    • CommentTimeMar 22nd 2017 edited
     
    In such cases, wire all surprised ? I amp ersuaded that there needs to be more resistance to current regs in London ohms...

    They ought to have thought more about this faraday or two...

    gg
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeMar 22nd 2017
     
    Ohm y!
    or ohm and dry
    • CommentAuthorDarylP
    • CommentTimeMar 22nd 2017
     
    ouch....:cry:
    Our cousins across the Manche have taken another approach, and are doing away with screw fixings for cables, enabling 'tool-free' wire capture, for MCBS,RCDs etc etc:cool:
    • CommentAuthorEd Davies
    • CommentTimeMar 22nd 2017
     
    Well done, if slightly plodding, video on possible problems with metal consumer units on TT supplies:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9JLSTjV4imA

    Probably fewer TT supplies in London than some other parts of the country. Hence my remarks on another thread about hanging on to a plastic consumer unit if on a TT supply.
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