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    • CommentAuthordelprado
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2017
     
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/earth/earthnews/7723508/Ivy-is-good-for-walls-finds-Oxford-University-study.html

    What does everyone think about this? I always thought it was rubbish that it was bad for walls, given how many historic buildings have. And made sure it doesn't grow into roof, etc
    • CommentAuthorRoger
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2017
     
    It can protect against weathering as long as pointing is more or less sound, and if kept out of roofs, windows etc..

    Danger comes when someone cuts through the base, and the relatively harmless anchor roots transform into water-seeking roots, and drive in searching for moisture.
  1.  
    I am a little skeptical.

    I think they have rather ignored the more important scenario of seriously damaged buildings, which is the really long-term deterioration of the quality of the wall underneath.

    eg I do not think that they have demonstrated that a wall that was covered in ivy starting in say 1925 or 1965 would be more sound in 2025 than a wall that was sound in 1925 or 1965 and not covered in ivy.

    And they do not seem to have evaluated the long term damage by ivy roots on a building vs the extra damage caused by extra temp. swings, heating, humidity etc by not having the ivy there.

    I think that that is the telling case that does the existential damage to privately owned or domestic buildings, rather than short durations and organisations like EH and the NT which employ surveyors and gardeners and can do regular professional inspections.

    If I do want a climber, I think I can probably find another one that will offer some of the benefits without the same risks.

    Ferdinand
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2017
     
    • CommentAuthorgyrogear
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2017
     
    Posted By: ferdinand2000If I do want a climber, I think I can probably find another one that will offer some of the benefits without the same risks.


    Jasmine is nice !

    https://www.google.fr/search?q=chinese+jasmin&client=firefox-b&tbm=isch&imgil=fnCEmXfTDlyCZM%253A%253BqXqAH6KqP0a1iM%253Bhttps%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.gardenia.net%25252Fplant%25252Ftrachelospermum-jasminoides-star-jasmine&source=iu&pf=m&fir=fnCEmXfTDlyCZM%253A%252CqXqAH6KqP0a1iM%252C_&usg=__oyrCNYct20PqarwRGrBrAbEnm1k%3D&biw=1024&bih=641&ved=0ahUKEwjfruCR2fbSAhWFcBoKHbtMCp0QyjcIMg&ei=8QbZWJ_yNIXhabuZqegJ#imgrc=fnCEmXfTDlyCZM:

    gg
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2017
     
    Reading University have been researching this for a number of years and it does seem to save energy on poorly insulated homes

    I think homes should be well insulated and in these cases the negatives far out weigh the positive outcomes.
    • CommentAuthordelprado
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2017
     
    I probably should have reworded the subject line. All I wanted to believe was not that it is good, but that it is not harmful, because its so lovely and charming :)

    I know the conventional wisdom for climbing plants if you are worried is to grow those which are not self clinging
  2.  
    I would be interested in others' comments.

    My experience was that a house which had had ivy on waterproof but old rubbefill walls for a period, which were then exposed for several decades, essentially needed repointing throughout because it had taken the "sharpness" off the stone.

    ie we had a photo from 1919 showing total ivory covering, and later reports of the same, but in the mid-1970s only one facade was covered.

    This was sandstone. The ashlar quoins survived OK.

    That alone is one variable which may not be in the paper, which I cannot find.

    Ferdinand
    • CommentAuthorgyrogear
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2017
     
    Posted By: ferdinand2000showing total ivory covering


    is this in India, or Africa ?
    wood not be allowed now...

    gg:wink:
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2017
     
    Posted By: gyrogearJasmine is nice !

    But isn't a climber! It's a twiner.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2017
     
    Posted By: delpradoI probably should have reworded the subject line. All I wanted to believe was not that it is good, but that it is not harmful, because its so lovely and charming :)

    It is clearly harmful in some cases, so the precautionary principle indicates that we should avoid it entirely.

    Which is said with tongue somewhat in cheek, but contains a grain of truth IMHO.

    What is certain is that there's no way I will allow a clinging climber on the walls of my house, and that wherever I see ivy in my garden I will try to eradicate it. By contrast, I'll happily allow lonicera japonica Halliana a place in the graden, whilst there are parts of the USA where it's an offence to grow it.
  3.  
    Ivy will destroy a soft mortar and push apart the wall. On old (lime) walls it is seriously destructive.
    On a new brick and cement mortar you might be ok, but it will find any tiny crevice to put roots into. I wouldn't have it on any building i cared about.
    It keeps the wall wetter, (it collects dust, dirt, bird poo and old leaves behind it) so i can't see how it helps with insulation…? I've pulled loads of it off walls and its not a clean job.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeApr 20th 2017
     
    It messes up roof tiles big time

    Overall don't let it grow on your walls
    • CommentAuthordelprado
    • CommentTimeApr 20th 2017
     
    I'm still not sure I am convinced - I go back to my examples of all sorts of historic buildings being covered in it - albeit not left to grow into roof spaces, etc.
  4.  
    I had ivy growing on a stone/mortar wall and it grew through the wall and started to dislodge stones as the roots grew. It also got to the roof and started to dislodge roof tiles. So IMO ivy on walls is not a good idea however much you may like the look of it, as I did.
    • CommentAuthorlineweight
    • CommentTimeApr 20th 2017
     
    One consequence, whether or not it actively damages the wall, is that you can't see the wall. So, if, say there is a leaking gutter that is slowly but continually leaking water down the face of the wall, you might never know about it until the damage becomes serious enough that more drastic things start happening.
    • CommentAuthorskyewright
    • CommentTimeApr 20th 2017
     
    Posted By: delpradoI'm still not sure I am convinced - I go back to my examples of all sorts of historic buildings being covered in it - albeit not left to grow into roof spaces, etc.

    Just because an historic building has it now, doesn't necessarily mean it had that level of ivy years ago when it had a large, cheap, workforce of gardeners to keep things under control.
    Just a thought...
  5.  
    Ivy on walls: No, No, NO.
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