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    • CommentAuthordelprado
    • CommentTimeApr 17th 2017
     
    I am thinking about doing this with cob. Is it stupid to think that?
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeApr 17th 2017
     
    It has been done. A web search will show articles & videos. How will you protect the wall from the weather?
  1.  
    You would need stone or brick probably up to say 600mm and a good 'roof' to protect the cob from rain - and the sides would need have a protective render. In other words the same protection would be needed as given to a cob house - otherwise the cob wall will melt in the wet weather.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2017
     
    I have seen it done with watles for sides and a thatched roof on top, looked great.
  2.  
    If the oversail of the roof is sufficient and you have the 'good pair of boots' you may not need a render other than perhaps a (decorative) 'smooth cob' finish. You might, if you want, lime-wash each year, though.

    The attached pic shows a stone wall with a thatched 'roof', in Avebury. Interestingly, on closer inspection, it also seems to show a small dinosaur about to cross the road....
      DSCF3164 - Copy.JPG
  3.  
    Edited to remove duplicate post
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2017
     
    chased by an Armadillo
  4.  
    ''chased by an Armadillo''

    Oh yes! Or a wild boar.
    • CommentAuthordelprado
    • CommentTimeApr 19th 2017
     
    hmm, I suppose as this is directly next to neighbours land it would be a struggle to render the other side, as it were, and harder to maintain.
    • CommentAuthordelprado
    • CommentTimeOct 13th 2017
     
    Several months on, I have had another idea! How about a 2m enclosed mesh system, a bit like a gabion, but rather than filling with stones, filling with bark? Great sound absorption I imagine, especially for higher frequencies, which is mostly what you are worried about in a garden, reasonably cheap. Just top it up from time to time?
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeOct 13th 2017
     
    Posted By: delpradoSeveral months on, I have had another idea! How about a 2m enclosed mesh system, a bit like a gabion, but rather than filling with stones, filling with bark? Great sound absorption I imagine, especially for higher frequencies, which is mostly what you are worried about in a garden, reasonably cheap. Just top it up from time to time?

    You can certainly fill gabion baskets with logs and other smallish bits of timber. How would you stop bark falling out of the mesh? I suppose you could fit smaller mesh inside the baskets to restrain smaller pieces. Don't forget that with tall, narrow gabions you will need a good solid and level support and steel posts anchored in the base running up the middle of the baskets to hold them stable.

    Sounds doable and fairly attractive to me. I have three panels filled with broken bricks that many people think are wood-filled. You can grow plants up the gabions as well.
    • CommentAuthordelprado
    • CommentTimeOct 13th 2017
     
    Thanks Dave. Yeah I need to take advice but I can see them with quasi foundations and posts sunk into it, etc. I wonder how thin it can go. I think their best feature is no need to plaster, which might crack, is a cost in itself, gets fungi, whereas stone is natural and can be left as such forever more!
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeOct 13th 2017
     
    We have concrete trench-fill as a foundation with paving slabs we happened to have around on top to provide a flat surface. There are holes cut in the paving slabs to allow steel poles to pass through down into the concrete.

    If you do go ahead, one trick I found after filling the first basket was to tie lengths of garden wire from side-to-side in the baskets to stop them bulging out so much from the weight of bricks inside them.
    • CommentAuthordelprado
    • CommentTimeOct 15th 2017
     
    If I have stone facing outward, I wonder what I should add in for the other side, for sound aborbancy? Not soil as things will grow in it. Not perlite or similar because its too light
    • CommentAuthorgyrogear
    • CommentTimeOct 15th 2017
     
    lime-stabilised soil might be OK though...

    gg
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeOct 15th 2017
     
    There's no problem with things growing in it, unless you choose to make it a problem. Indeed some people deliberately put plants in and on gabion walls.
    • CommentAuthordelprado
    • CommentTimeOct 16th 2017
     
    I just don't want weeds growing in it. In front of it I will be planting phylostachys bamboo.
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