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    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeJun 16th 2017
     
    Posted By: Jamsterwash when you get to work?
    And get home again, so an extra 2 kWh/day maybe.
    Then there is the extra food needed to power the bike, maybe an extra 0.5 kWh.
    My partner has just got a electric assist bike, seems to do about 18 miles on a charge (0.5 kWh), but she has to peddle a bit.
    • CommentAuthorJamster
    • CommentTimeJun 16th 2017
     
    Posted By: SteamyTea
    Posted By: Jamsterwash when you get to work?
    And get home again, so an extra 2 kWh/day maybe.
    Then there is the extra food needed to power the bike, maybe an extra 0.5 kWh.
    My partner has just got a electric assist bike, seems to do about 18 miles on a charge (0.5 kWh), but she has to peddle a bit.


    But has to be offset against whatever energy source the alternative method of transport would have too of course.

    One of the emerging arguments is that solutions to air pollution often have other considerable health benefits.
  1.  
    Agreed, I don't know the math but 11 miles at say 0.8kwh/mile (based on 35mpg) for petrol gives 8.8kwh

    I could of course catch the bus but it doesn't suit the school run collection times etc etc
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJun 16th 2017
     
    When I was a lad there was no such thing as the school run. We walked, cycled or bussed our way home ourselves.
  2.  
    That's fine back in the day, but I won't be allowing my 7yr old son to walk just over a mile to school by himself....
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeJun 16th 2017
     
    Posted By: JamsterBut has to be offset against whatever energy source the alternative method of transport would have too of course.
    I agree, but there is not a no-cost solution.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJun 16th 2017
     
    Posted By: VictorianecoThat's fine back in the day, but I won't be allowing my 7yr old son to walk just over a mile to school by himself....

    I hope there's a missing smiley there! Or start a walking bus.
    • CommentAuthorJamster
    • CommentTimeJun 19th 2017
     
    Posted By: SteamyTea
    Posted By: JamsterBut has to be offset against whatever energy source the alternative method of transport would have too of course.
    I agree, but there is not a no-cost solution.


    I'll pop out a new thread I think... Might get something going.
  3.  
    <blockquote><cite>Posted By: Victorianeco</cite>That's fine back in the day, but I won't be allowing my 7yr old son to walk just over a mile to school by himself....</blockquote>

    Why? Is this fear of danger from motor vehicles or something else?
  4.  
    Because he's 7.....

    I don't deem that a suitable age in my area to be out alone.
  5.  
    <blockquote><cite>Posted By: Victorianeco</cite>Because he's 7.....

    I don't deem that a suitable age in my area to be out alone.</blockquote>

    I'm genuinely interested in what you think the risk is - I've been trying to work out how old I was when I was allowed out 'by myself' to compare to friends kids now.

    Certainly by the time I was 10 years old (living on the outskirts of Chelmsford) my friends and I were going off into the country lanes for the day on our bikes and I was walking into the centre of town to see a friend. I'm sure I was walking to school unaccompanied as well. We moved away shortly after and I've not been back to get a feel for how large the distances were.

    My friends kids in Switzerland have been making their own way to school since they were under 7.

    I get the impression kids in the UK have very little independence now but I'm not sure what the perceived dangers are (but I'm interested to know).
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeJun 20th 2017 edited
     
    I used to walk the half mile to my primary school (Swanmead, Basildon) when I was 5.
    Changed to one in Southend and used to take the bus and train, I was 9 then.
    Was out on my bike when I was 7 on my own. Walked to swimming pool when I was same age.

    One problem these days is that many primary schools do not allow kids to be unaccompanied. Parents/Guardians have to physically take the kids into the playground and pick them up from the same place.
    This policy is because of separated parents and when I was taking 'naughty kids' to school a couple of years back, I witnessed some very distraught parents who where not allowed to collect their children. Police were often called to sort it out.
    One school I dropped kids off at had double fencing to stop people getting in.
    Occasionally I had to pick the kids up without their parents and there was a system of 'secret words' that I had to say to the school administrator before I could take them away. And I had been more than thoroughly checked out by the police and council.
  6.  
    I don't feel in today's world it's safe, cars don't stop at zebra crossings I've noticed, people on their mobile phones driving, I don't think his route would be safe.

    Then I'm not risking him being kidnapped and so forth. I know the risk may be small but not on my watch! I also work for local government and I'm aware of unsavory individuals being housed in the near vicinity
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeJun 20th 2017
     
    Posted By: VictorianecoThen I'm not risking him being kidnapped and so forth. I know the risk may be small but not on my watch! I also work for local government and I'm aware of unsavory individuals being housed in the near vicinity
    Move then.
  7.  
    What a ridiculous comment
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2017 edited
     
    Posted By: VictorianecoWhat a ridiculous comment
    Why, if you really believe that the community you live in is unsafe for children and you are unwilling to invest the time and money changing it, you should not have a second thought about moving to a 'better' area.
  8.  
    Where in the UK is it considered 'safe' for a 7 year old to walk to school and back on their own - Or even do a bus journey on their own?
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2017
     
  9.  
    http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-lincolnshire-11288967

    "A Lincolnshire family have been warned they could be reported to social services for letting a seven-year-old girl walk alone to the school bus stop.
    Mark McCullough, from Glentham, said his daughter Isabelle is capable of walking 20 metres (65 ft) to the bus and crossing a road home.
    But the county council said it was concerned for her safety and the road was too busy for her to cross alone."
  10.  
    https://www.nspcc.org.uk/preventing-abuse/keeping-children-safe/staying-safe-away-from-home/

    "some 11 year olds will be quite capable of going to the park or the shops on their own but others might not be ready to do this safely."
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2017
     
    The BBC story describes the nanny state gone mad. I hope the parents get a full apology or even prosecute the council for harassment. The NSPCC quote says nothing, does it: some children are geniuses and some are idiots. You could equally well make the same statement about adults, or even dogs.
  11.  
    How the hell have we got to a society where it's not safe enough for a 7 year old to walk to the bus stop by themselves. The problem is not the child or the parents.
  12.  
    Back to bikes, the tricross has front wheel judder under braking.

    Thoughts?
  13.  
    Headstock bearings sloppy
    ditto wheel bearings
    rim out of true/damaged
    duff break shoes
  14.  
    Brake judder...

    Cantilever brakes. When you brake the fork bends backwards slightly, because of the way the brakes work, that pulls them on slightly more. The front wheel skips a bit, the fork releases forward, the brake cable slackens. Repeat.
  15.  
    Are disc brakes easy to retrofit on the Specialized tricross utilising both upper and bar brakes?
  16.  
    <blockquote><cite>Posted By: Victorianeco</cite>Are disc brakes easy to retrofit on the Specialized tricross utilising both upper and bar brakes?</blockquote>

    Assuming the fork and frame have mounts for disk brakes at a minimum you'd need new wheels (and you'd need to use cable operated discs). There are a few cable disc options including 'hybrid' ones that have hydraulic at the caliper operated by a cable rather than just a cable operating a lever.

    If you want full hydro then you'd need new shifters as well which are the most expensive bit of a gear set. None of the new drop bar shifter/hydro brake levers have 'suicide' levers on the bar top.
  17.  
    Well I've 'toed in' the pads but using the penny method.

    Will take it for a ride tomorrow and see if it makes a difference.
  18.  
    Sorted!
  19.  
    Glad to hear it wasn't my doom laden scenario.
   
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