Home  5  Books  5  GBEzine  5  News  5  HelpDesk  5  Register  5  GreenBuilding.co.uk
Not signed in (Sign In)

Categories



Green Building
"The most popular book on green building in the UK today."
New fourth edition in two volumes!

Order both books now for the combined price of just £9.95
and free delivery!

(free delivery applies to UK addresses only).

Or get both books for just £7.90 if purchased at the same time as a subscription to Green Building magazine





Vanilla 1.0.3 is a product of Lussumo. More Information: Documentation, Community Support.

Welcome to new Forum Visitors
Join the forum now and benefit from discussions with thousands of other green building fans and discounts on Green Building Press publications: Apply now.




    • CommentAuthorcjard
    • CommentTimeJun 3rd 2017 edited
     
    My neighbour occasionally burns the clippings from his tree surgery business. While he's generally quite considerate with regard to wind direction, I does occasionally switch direction while the fire is still burning, leaving me with a missus kicking off because the house is full of smoke. I also have a fire from time to time, so I'm not so motivated to start calling the kettle black.. But I'd like to know if there is any way of filtering the draw from the MVHR? At the moment I just turn it off, and the house stays generally smell free, til the wind direction changes..

    I placed the vents on the roof, some 8metres up to try and avoid low lying smells, but this smoke does seem to reach the intake from time to time..

    Perhaps getting him a better burner (or alternative disposal method) might be a solution, rather than it just being a bonfire on the floor.. Anyone know of something that is more effective at burning green wood? Or some other disposal method?
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTimeJun 3rd 2017
     
    https://www.aecb.net/forum/index.php?topic=1450.0


    Pollens 9 - 80 microns, mould spores 3 - 50 microns, dust 1 - 1000 microns, smoke up to 1 micron.
    The finnest filters that are used on forced ventilation systems filter to 5 microns.
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTimeJun 3rd 2017
     
    It's very hard to stop smoke from green wood. When I cut my hedge and burn the clippings I wait until January to cut it (fewer leaf), then I let the cuttings dry for a month or two before burning. Even then it smokes.
  1.  
    For me, its all about not "just burning" the clippings. If they are not being used to create useful heat - then they should not be burnt. Can you not try to persuade him to take them to one of the green recycling places, where they get turned into woodchips or compost.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJun 3rd 2017
     
    Posted By: cjardMy neighbour occasionally burns the clippings from his tree surgery business.

    According to https://www.gov.uk/guidance/waste-exemption-d7-burning-waste-in-the-open, he can't. At least not at any place except where he cut them down:

    "You should be careful to position the bonfire where it will not cause nuisance to neighbours through excessive smoke or odour.

    The burning must take place only at the place where the waste is produced."

    As Tim says, try and persuade him to shred it instead. He could perhaps sell the results as a mulch.
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeJun 3rd 2017
     
    I think you have to be more specific with the term "clippings". To me that infers leaf and twigs akin to hedge clippings. Tree surgeons usually chip this, "brash" on site. Branch wood 1.5 to 2 inch upwards is more like logwood and when dry and maybe split is exactly the sort of fuel for wood stoves.
    If he is burning the former twig stuff he's got too much time on his hands.
    • CommentAuthorcjard
    • CommentTimeJun 5th 2017
     
    By clippings I meant the chipped result of the smaller branches, and hedge cuttings he takes.. So probably better called brash :)

    In my part of the world a green waste bin costs 40 quid a year and you're allowed 3 of them.. He could probably put most of it in there if he's prepared to have a pile in the corner as a buffer.. Burning it, he's still got to dispose of the ash I'd imagine, and that can't be pleasant to have on boots, tromped around the house
  2.  
    Posted By: cjardBy clippings I meant the chipped result of the smaller branches, and hedge cuttings he takes.. So probably better called brash :)

    IANAE, but...

    It may have been brash before it was chipped, but anything that's been through a chipper is...
    ... chippings.

    Chippings, especially fresh damp ones, probably make for an awful bonfire since it will be difficult to get much flow of air through the material for a fast hot burn?

    Posted By: cjardIn my part of the world a green waste bin costs 40 quid a year and you're allowed 3 of them.. He could probably put most of it in there if he's prepared to have a pile in the corner as a buffer.. Burning it, he's still got to dispose of the ash I'd imagine, and that can't be pleasant to have on boots, tromped around the house

    If he has a 'tree surgery business' isn't this, at least technically, commercial waste?
  3.  
    Just inform your idiot of a neighbor that he is missing a trick. If he stored the woodchip for 2 years in tonne bags then he could sell the resultant rotted woodchip as soil improver at £25 per bag. Nothing like hard cash to change a tree surgeons method. Personally I would not tell him just say the bonfires are a problem and as a solution you will take the woodchip off him as a good neighbor free of charge. Then compost it yourself.
    • CommentAuthorCharli
    • CommentTimeJun 6th 2017
     
    At the allotments we have a tree surgeon drop chippings off, he gets rid of them for free and gets points for helping a local non-profit! Got to be easier to find someone who wants them than spend time burning them.

    I've also paid £50 a load for wood chips in the past, before the allotment agreement was set up.
Add your comments

    Username Password
  • Format comments as
 
   
The Ecobuilding Buzz
Site Map    |   Home    |   View Cart    |   Pressroom   |   Business   |   Links   
Logout    

© Green Building Press