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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
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  1.  
    Posted By: lineweightFor example, aviation. Is it because failures tend to be dramatic, and very visible?

    And the car industry where (discovered) safety problems result in a recall, whereas early part failure - providing it is outside any warranty period - tend to be left for the consumer to pick up the tab, unless there is a marketing reason to do something i.e. consumers make enough noise.
    • CommentAuthorArtiglio
    • CommentTime4 days ago
     
    It happens because unlike the car/aviation industry , workplace health and safety in general, the social housing sector in particular is not ultimately responsible , its effectively protected by a government backed guarantee, it does’nt have to worry about share value, investor dividends , profit, cost of insurance or market share.

    Much of the legislation in the private rented sector exempts the social sector, they have become effectively a law unto themselves, this will hopefully change after the inquiry, but the evidence will be damming for just about every party involved, the TMO and Kensington council,will be put under the spotlight and heads will roll, but the regulatory system will also be shown to be badly lacking. A culture of doing the bare minimum using every get out clause available will be revealed.

    Billions will end up being funnelled to social housing providers and councils over the coming years, to put things right, money that could have gone into creation of more housing.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTime4 days ago
     
    Posted By: Peter_in_HungaryAnd the car industry where (discovered) safety problems result in a recall

    Not so the white goods industry though. I'm thinking of tumble driers and plastic-backed fridges for example.
  2.  
    Posted By: ArtiglioIt happens because unlike the car/aviation industry , workplace health and safety in general, the social housing sector in particular is not ultimately responsible , its effectively protected by a government backed guarantee, it does’nt have to worry about share value, investor dividends , profit, cost of insurance or market share.

    Much of the legislation in the private rented sector exempts the social sector, they have become effectively a law unto themselves, this will hopefully change after the inquiry, but the evidence will be damming for just about every party involved, the TMO and Kensington council,will be put under the spotlight and heads will roll, but the regulatory system will also be shown to be badly lacking. A culture of doing the bare minimum using every get out clause available will be revealed.

    Billions will end up being funnelled to social housing providers and councils over the coming years, to put things right, money that could have gone into creation of more housing.


    Don't you think that many of the failures in design, detailing, constructed reality, maintenance and the governing regulation that have been made visible at Grenfell would also be found in lots buildings outside the social housing sector?
    • CommentAuthorArtiglio
    • CommentTime4 days ago
     
    Lineweight

    Undoubtedly the same failings could be found outside of the social sector, but i would not expect them to be as widespread as the social sector.
    The stock of rented / owned flats apartments in the private rented sector will be mixed in with units owned by occupiers, majority will be leashold and managed by property companies who have an interest in doing chargeable works. In addition relatively modern blocks where units were sold will have insurance backed guarantees when newly built which will have needed levels of compliance. Though we already hear of facades of private blocks needing replacement, management companies/ leaseholders/ insurers/ builders will be negotiating how this is dealt with.
    The social sector works on a funding model that generates insufficient cash flow to maintain buildings properly, we had the decent homes standard introduced in 1997 , intended to bring 1.7 million homes up to standard between 1997 and 2003 this cost around 15.6 billion to update 670,000 homes. This was funded by borrowing and central government funding. By the end of the scheme costs , based on above figures, could have been around 40 billion.
    This representing the shortfall in rents the social sector had effectively accrued if the housing stock was kept in good nick. You don’t see these figures bandied about when the cost of housing in private / social sectors are compared.
    As a result corners continually cut. In private sector pure greed is the issue. But there are more than enough laws to deal with the rogues should councils wish to deal with them.
    More failures will be found in the nhs,mod,prison estates basically any state owned / run sector. I’d expect PFI provided buildings to be particularly problematic.
    Basically the political imperative over many years and all parties has been to provide the maximum impact for minimum cost, so hardly a starting point for best practice.
    Grenfell will , if the investigations and enquiries are allowed to branch out, uncover massive issues. All will have been operating in plain site, its taken a combination of failures resulting in the tradegy that unfolded to bring things to light.
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTime3 days ago edited
     
    Posted By: Peter_in_Hungaryacross the board we demand value for money aka cheap
    What is that, if not a political choice? It's wrapped up, politically, as Austerity, and that chimes with the gut ethos of an electorate that's sufficient to elect those politicians who play that card, whether to pander to said electorate, or as a gift to their mates in the City.

    'Across the board' the 'demand for value for money' is delivered by squeezing the pips out of all safety or public interest considerations, in the name of reducing red tape - and that's great for corporate revenue and private accumulation.

    We can't wash our hands of responsibility for the deterioration and cheapening of the soft, working guts of society. Government is the channel by which the tone of society is set, for the hidden benefit of whoever, and we get the governments that most effectively play on our meanest, self-fulfilling poverty-conscious instincts and fears. The solution, if any, ever, lies in our hands and bigger hearts alone, as it should do.
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