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  1.  
    our large 'village' in Shropshire has been landed with a proposal of an over 100 house development.
    The Parish Council wants to provide a back up for the situation that the development gets the go-ahead and is looking for above building regs base lines to tie the developer to in case they get the nod.
    I would like to argue for Passivhaus standard as a starting point and am looking for other authorities that have gone down this route. I know that Bristol has been starting to include a lot of Passivhaus buildings in their planning, the latest Passivehouse+ magazine mentions Norwich with a plan of 1000 Passivhaus builds.
    Can anyone show me a link with details of a local authority incorporating the P.H. standard or requesting developers to build to it. Thanks for your comments, Claus
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTime7 days ago
     
    Exeter's Social Housing programme has been 100% PH for some time - something like 100 units?

    Dun Laoghaire District Council, a large chunk of Dublin, has made PH mandatory for all building, other Irish Councils following.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTime7 days ago
     
    Irish authrities don't count, unfortunately.

    I thought that the latest rules disallowed Merton rules? i.e. you need to look at the NPPF.

    Norwich is different, AIUI. They have chosen to build PH social housing, not forced anybody else to adopt PH or any other standard other than vanilla BR.

    We have a proposal for approx 300 houses in our parish, which claim that BR guarantees energy efficiency, so I'd love to be proved wrong.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTime7 days ago
     
    I would say to build to a robust low energy standard similar to PH

    The Exeter experience is game changing in that they are building to PH for the same cost as it would cost them to build to the far inferior standards required by current building regulations.

    http://readingsustainabilitycentre.co.uk/social-housing-providers-making-low-energy-the-norm/
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTime6 days ago edited
     
    Posted By: djhIrish authrities don't count, unfortunately
    It all counts, if we're looking for proof of do-ability in comparable conditions - it's UK's (or just England's?) Merton-rules ban that doesn't count, being just a local ideological aberation
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTime6 days ago
     
    Several of the best London Boroughs ask for PH now.

    My local authority talk about it and it is even mentioned in their strategy documents, local plan etc, but needless to say no action.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTime6 days ago
     
    But that's not what we're looking for here. We're not looking for generalities. We're looking for precedent of an English parish council imposing conditions on a third-party planning permission.
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTime6 days ago edited
     
    I suggest you look up the rules (6 tests) governing the imposition or "use of planning conditions". If these tests aren't met the developer stands a chance of getting them removed at appeal. They are part of the NPPF..

    https://www.gov.uk/guidance/use-of-planning-conditions

    Does your neighbourhood or local plan say anything about planning conditions such as Passivhaus standards? Approved plans carry a lot of weight with Appeal Inspectors. Draft plans carry only a little weight. No plan and you have a problem justifying applying any "special" condition.

    Personally I think it's a mistake for this issue to be address with planning conditions. We should change/improve the building regulations instead.

    I spent three years fighting a planning application and cannot under estimate the importance of getting what you want into local and neighbourhood plans. Look at it from the governments perspective... If the locals feel that concerned about an issue they would have put it in the local plan wouldn't they? No plan? Then local residents can't be that bothered and the development should be allowed if it meets national policies.
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTime6 days ago edited
     
    PS: As I understand it Passivhaus is a proprietary standard. I would be surprised if anyone can get away with imposing a legal requirement to meet the Passivehaus standard rather then an equivalent Passive House standard or CSH.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTime6 days ago
     
    CSH has gone
    • CommentAuthorborpin
    • CommentTime6 days ago
     
    What always strikes me, is that any proposed development of housing is always opposed, and often by the same folk lamenting the shortage of housing.

    And they always come back with "but we are special because xyz". I say if not there then where?

    The only grounds for opposition IMHO is where the mix favours the large profitable houses rather than what is actually required (affordable - I'll avoid the toxic 'social' tag). Infrastructure can always be improved and expecting the infrastructure before the houses is crazy. There is a school I see from the train on the way into Glasgow next to a large housing development. It started just before the financial crisis. School was finished and shut up for years as the site was mothballed. Only now has it come into use - a waste of money at the time.

    Developers have an incentive to get the infrastructure in place as that does impact the saleable nature of their products.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTime6 days ago
     
    Never met one of those yet, they only ever do what they have to.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTime5 days ago
     
    Norwich City are good too, https://youtu.be/iLzHJUfxjlE
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