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  1.  
    Can the external air intake for a wood burning stove be taken up through the attic/roof. Whilst taking it through the adjacent wall is the usual choice I have stone /rubble walls and you can't make a small hole in a wall like that. (the last time I needed a 100mm hole in such a wall it finished up about 2 ft in dia.).
  2.  
    The Poujoulat Efficience chimneys do that (in addition to also drawing in the air through the chimney pipe).
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeJun 30th 2017
     
    Can you use ducting of some sort to terminate somewhere near the stove, say the rear with a hit and miss grille. The inlet for that air supply I suppose could come from anywhere, roof/ wall etc..
    • CommentAuthorBeau
    • CommentTimeJun 30th 2017
     
    I don't know about going through the roof but going through a rubble infill wall is not so bad. Our walls are 600 mm rubble infill with granite outer faces. Took an afternoon to get our 100mm air inlet in. Drill some small holes right through a bit outside the required diameter and then just bash away the waste with an SDS set to chisel.
  3.  
    Posted By: owlmanCan you use ducting of some sort to terminate somewhere near the stove, say the rear with a hit and miss grille. The inlet for that air supply I suppose could come from anywhere, roof/ wall etc..

    I can connect to the stove inlet with a duct - I also suppose the air supply can come from anywhere, just checking that there is no reason why it can't come down from the roof.
  4.  
    Posted By: BeauI don't know about going through the roof but going through a rubble infill wall is not so bad. Our walls are 600 mm rubble infill with granite outer faces. Took an afternoon to get our 100mm air inlet in. Drill some small holes right through a bit outside the required diameter and then just bash away the waste with an SDS set to chisel.

    My walls are basalt bolders with rubble infill and earth for mortar with lime/sand render. The problem is that the vibration of the drill trying to drill the basalt shakes the infill down which then jams the drill - either that or when you pull the drill out the infill falls down and blocks the hole you have just drilled. All in all I'd rather not do it again if I don't have to.
    • CommentAuthorBeau
    • CommentTimeJun 30th 2017 edited
     
    <blockquote><cite>Posted By: Peter_in_Hungary</cite><blockquote><cite>Posted By: Beau</cite>I don't know about going through the roof but going through a rubble infill wall is not so bad. Our walls are 600 mm rubble infill with granite outer faces. Took an afternoon to get our 100mm air inlet in. Drill some small holes right through a bit outside the required diameter and then just bash away the waste with an SDS set to chisel.</blockquote>
    My walls are basalt bolders with rubble infill and earth for mortar with lime/sand render. The problem is that the vibration of the drill trying to drill the basalt shakes the infill down which then jams the drill - either that or when you pull the drill out the infill falls down and blocks the hole you have just drilled. All in all I'd rather not do it again if I don't have to.</blockquote



    Sounds like a lot of effort and extra ducting to avoid one awkward hole. I have had the problem with the bit occasionally jamming as the rubble slips down but with good gutsy drill and lots of pulling out to clear the hole we were able to get through ours. If it's just the rubble slipping causing the problems might it possible to drill a hole and inject gun grade foam and water and leave to set? Then there should be no more subsequent movement to cause problems but should add not tried this idea :smile:
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeJun 30th 2017
     
    Posted By: Peter_in_Hungary
    Posted By: owlmanCan you use ducting of some sort to terminate somewhere near the stove, say the rear with a hit and miss grille. The inlet for that air supply I suppose could come from anywhere, roof/ wall etc..

    I can connect to the stove inlet with a duct - I also suppose the air supply can come from anywhere, just checking that there is no reason why it can't come down from the roof.


    In some ways taking air through the roof could theoretically be better, exterior cold air falls, and all that.
  5.  
    Hi Peter, I read a Finnish report on external air intakes for wood burning stoves, can't find it now. The conclusion was that the efficiency of WB Stoves dropped by up to 15% when cold external air was used for ignition.
    I now advised clients not to worry about installing external air supply for stoves.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJun 30th 2017
     
    Posted By: Viking HouseThe conclusion was that the efficiency of WB Stoves dropped by up to 15% when cold external air was used for ignition.

    Presumably if the air was introduced by a concentric flue, it wouldn't be cold?
  6.  
    Posted By: Viking HouseI now advised clients not to worry about installing external air supply for stoves.

    Here an external air supply is required if you have a gas cooker or any other gas appliance other than balanced flue type in the same air space. (internal doors do not create a separate air space) And from experience a room will get very stuffy if you have half way decent windows and no external air supply.
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