Home  5  Books  5  GBEzine  5  News  5  HelpDesk  5  Register  5  GreenBuilding.co.uk
Not signed in (Sign In)

Categories



Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

Buy individually or both books together. Delivery is free!


widget @ surfing-waves.com




Vanilla 1.0.3 is a product of Lussumo. More Information: Documentation, Community Support.

Welcome to new Forum Visitors
Join the forum now and benefit from discussions with thousands of other green building fans and discounts on Green Building Press publications: Apply now.




  1.  
    Does anyone have a rough idea on what size house (preferably Walter Segal timber frame) could be built on a plot this size?

    There is drive access to the far right of the plot so would assume there would need to be off street parking and a garden allocated.

    Is there some form of formula?

    There is also a mature ash tree rear centre of the plot which I believe may have a TPO in force (awaiting confirmation). How close can you build to such tree and what type of foundations would be best?

    I'd imagine a small bungalow would suit the plot and area.
  2.  
    This is a link to a previous planning application (refused)

    http://vogonline.planning-register.co.uk/PlaRecord.aspx?AppNo=2007/01700/FUL

    Looks like it would be a no go although it was declined 9yrs ago.

    Any thoughts?
  3.  
    • CommentAuthorJamster
    • CommentTimeSep 4th 2017
     
    Those reasons for refusal aren't promising - I would say that the Ash tree (especially given the info in the planning refusal previously re it being not very nice basically) is way down the list of worries compared to the flood plain and visual impact...
    • CommentAuthorcjard
    • CommentTimeSep 4th 2017 edited
     
    "It had hymenoscyphus fraxineus; we had to cut it down"
    • CommentAuthorMarkyP
    • CommentTimeSep 4th 2017 edited
     
    worth finding out when the TPO was applied. My guess would be it was slapped on after the last planning application as a means to reduce planning prospects of the plot. Plot seems cheap for one with any prospect of planning but perhaps I'm too influenced by prices in the south east. Is the vendor asking for an overage? If you are seriously considering it, I'd pay for pre-application advice to get an idea of what, if anything, might be acceptable. On the upside, 9 years is a long time in planning, the prospects might have changed a lot since that last refusal.

    lots and lots of case history online where people have secured consent against the odds in unusual or difficult plots with a clever, well designed scheme. I rember one in Peckham, narrow tricky plot, big period houses either side, conservation issues. But consent secured for an amazing little single story timber clad house there, screened by planting, clever use of sky lights and internal space.

    but it's still £20k risk money you need to stump up for something that might never be anything more than a lawn.
    • CommentAuthorMike1
    • CommentTimeSep 4th 2017
     
    Apart from the flooding, looks like the main problem is that the garden needs to be screened off to be acceptable, but the anything other than a low wall is unacceptable - having taken a look on StreetView I can see why.
    Looks like the best bet may be to extend / redevelop the existing house, rather than building an additional unit.
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTimeSep 4th 2017
     
    You could fit a house on there but should you? Having seen the images on right move I reckon it should be left undeveloped for local residents to enjoy. Sorry.
  4.  
    Why should it be left for others to enjoy? The houses overlooking it would have once been land at one point.
  5.  
    Why should it be left for others to enjoy?

    Insert names of parcels of land such as Richmond Park, Singleton Park etc....?
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeSep 4th 2017
     
    The only way (if the tree has to stay) would be to build, curved, masonry outer (back) wall tight to the road boundary, everything lightweight and looking inward to the tree and staying far as possible away from it. Long thin house. With some ingenity, hardly any founds under the inner curve.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeSep 4th 2017
     
    Don't forget the sewer that has to be avoided.
  6.  
    I'm all for land being left available for people to enjoy, but that parcel of land was somebody's garden, if they wish to sell it then why shouldn't someone be allowed to build on it?

    If it was council's land or similar then yes I could see the point in allowing others to enjoy it etc. But at the moment whoever owns it has to upkeep it for the enjoyment of others? Seems a bit unfair.

    Djh, what sewer? There is a small stream to the left hand side of the plot running front to back. This could make a good argument for use for a water source heat pump or other renewable technology.

    I personally think a small disabled access bungalow constructed of green materials with a passive slab not to disturb the roots or built on stilts with ramped access would be ideal.
  7.  
    The tree looks to be in a poor condition, half dry and potentially dangerous. Perhaps a chance to get the TPO removed.
    However I agree with Markyp above - 20k seems too cheap for a plot with any chance of PP.
  8.  
    Phoned the Council and it's a £250 fee for pre advice which seems quite reasonable. They pointed me in the direction of the full report which having read it, my perception is as follows:

    1. It would need a full detail for flood prevention as it is in an indicated area - this was never provided previously

    2. The garden as mentioned is an issue, it can't be exposed and concealing it with fencing and so forth would also be an issue. Wouldn't a lovely hedgerow or bush satisfy this?

    3. I don't think the tree is that much of an issue given the tree officers opinion it is in poor condition.

    4. Almost every neighbour objected the previous plan. I think a traditional bungalow would perhaps receive a better response, maybe even with a green roof?
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTimeSep 5th 2017
     
    Posted By: Victorianeco I'm all for land being left available for people to enjoy, but that parcel of land was somebody's garden, if they wish to sell it then why shouldn't someone be allowed to build on it?

    If it was council's land or similar then yes I could see the point in allowing others to enjoy it etc. But at the moment whoever owns it has to upkeep it for the enjoyment of others? Seems a bit unfair.


    I meant enjoy in the broader sense, I don't mean they should be given access rights. The gardens and grass verges in many villages are wider than that plot and add considerable visual appeal to an area.

    Perhaps that plot looks different in the flesh but I can only say what I see from the rightmove info.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeSep 5th 2017
     
    Posted By: VictorianecoDjh, what sewer?

    The sewer illustrated in one of the previous planning documents that runs across the middle of the plot and that cannot be built over.
  9.  
    Posted By: Victorianeco2. The garden as mentioned is an issue, it can't be exposed and concealing it with fencing and so forth would also be an issue. Wouldn't a lovely hedgerow or bush satisfy this?

    Hedgerows & bushes tend to be considerably wider than fences...
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeSep 5th 2017
     
    A sewer is a gd reason for 'building on stilts' to bridge wide across it, or at least ground beams between isolated piers.
    A thought - is the site a highway visibility splay?
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeSep 5th 2017
     
    Read the planning documents, then afterwards come up with possible designs.
  10.  
    I think it's one of those things, if it sounds too good to be true it usually is...
  11.  
    <blockquote><cite>Posted By: djh</cite><blockquote><cite>Posted By: Victorianeco</cite>Djh, what sewer?</blockquote>
    The sewer illustrated in one of the previous planning documents that runs across the middle of the plot and that cannot be built over.</blockquote>

    It doesn't actually say you can't build over it? Welsh water have just noted its presence...
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeSep 5th 2017
     
    "No part of the building will be permitted within 3 metres either side of the centreline of the public sewer."
  12.  
    Where did you find that? In what section? Thanks
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeSep 5th 2017
     
    But that in my built experience (with 'shared drains' after they were taken into water board ownership and reclassified as sewers a few yrs ago) means you can't put any load within 3m, not that you can't bridge over it. Unless it's some mega trunk sewer - if so, would explain why that corner's been left unbuilt and will certainly remain so.
  13.  
    &quot;If you’re planning to extend your property, you’ll need to make sure you know if there are any public sewers or drains on your land.
    If there is pipework there it could affect your build, so it’s a good idea to find out before you begin.
    If you plan to build over, or within 3 meters of one of our sewer pipes or drains, you’ll need to secure our consent.
    To find out more about building over or close to sewers, please refer to our Guidance Notes.&quot;

    Taken from Welsh Water website

    The guidance notes suggest:

    &quot;You will need to establish and confirm: We’ll say yes, if... We’ll say no, if... Further advice: 1. The type of building works Your development involves a single or double storey residential extension, conservatory, annexe or garage which is attached to the existing property Your development involves the construction of a new residential property, the extension of industrial and commercial property or any detached ancillary buildings or structure We cannot permit a build over/close to for the following:X New residential properties X Extensions of industrial and commercial properties X Detached ancillary buildings or structure X
    If the pipe to be built over/close to is found to be defective and not repaired X The size of the pipe is greater than 225mm in diameter X The pipe diameter, direction, material or gradient changes beneath the area of the proposed build and cannot be replaced/removed. X If you are unable to relocate the access point, i.e. access is on junction of sewers or a change of direction X Your proposal involves an infill structure from one boundary to another where there are already structures on both sides X Pressurised pipes such as rising mains and water mains. &quot;

    So essentially they will not allow a new build to build over, so the question that needs to be found out is where exactly the drain is located on the land...
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeSep 5th 2017
     
    Yes, the project I did was an extension not newbuild (and it was England).
  14.  
    I found the drain plan, I guess if I were to measure 3m to the one side of the drain that would become the one side of the house, the other side would then be restricted by the car parking space (assume single car space for a small bungalow)

    Doesn't leave much room therefore for the dwelling itself, assuming garden space would need to be left at the rear as mentioned above.

    realistically what is the narrowest size for a dwelling? 6m?
      drain.JPG
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeSep 5th 2017
     
    Posted By: Victorianecoassume single car space for a small bungalow

    Didn't you read the two car requirement either?
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeSep 5th 2017 edited
     
    The car space can be on top of and beyond the drain, not 'on other side' of bungalow.

    On a tiny site it's totally worthwhile to do your best to get consent to build it hard on the boundary, maybe with near-blank perimeter walls, but lots of windows looking into the private interior of the site. Needs ingenious, non-standard design - get a good architect.

    On a small site, a v high %age of garden space can get wasted on useless narrow strips between house and boundary. It's amazing how generous the remainder of the site can seem, when it's all concentrated in one lump, nothing dissipated 'round the back'. That way, the vendor may be shocked to realise how little he's charged for what looks like a more spacious site than he realised! It's a fine way to let your design vision 'beat the odds' and give you value that 'the normals' couldn't see. Magazines are full of such mini-triumphs.
   
The Ecobuilding Buzz
Site Map    |   Home    |   View Cart    |   Pressroom   |   Business   |   Links   
Logout    

© Green Building Press