Home  5  Books  5  GBEzine  5  News  5  HelpDesk  5  Register  5  GreenBuilding.co.uk
Not signed in (Sign In)

Categories



Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

Buy individually or both books together. Delivery is free!


widget @ surfing-waves.com




Vanilla 1.0.3 is a product of Lussumo. More Information: Documentation, Community Support.

Welcome to new Forum Visitors
Join the forum now and benefit from discussions with thousands of other green building fans and discounts on Green Building Press publications: Apply now.




    • CommentAuthordelprado
    • CommentTimeSep 10th 2017
     
    I am thinking of making my study a windowless room

    Thanks
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeSep 10th 2017
     
    Why?
    • CommentAuthordelprado
    • CommentTimeSep 10th 2017
     
    Window is old double glazing and just looks at neighbours wall about 2m away. It's detached but houses are close together. Their dog is noisy also
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeSep 10th 2017
     
    Fire escape, or Fire fighting access in the event ,may be an issue, especially if it's in an upper floor, you didn't say. I don't know what the current regs. are. There is something special about daylight but in this instance I understand your logic. Many years ago I lived in a basement apartment and thinking back it depressed me, but just one room may be different.
    Personally I wouldn't find it a very inspirational place. However, with some good clever lighting, possibly Illuminated murals for example, it could be do-able. I'd need something to stop me thinking that I was in a sealed box, but then I have a tendency towards claustrophobia.
  1.  
  2.  
    Sounds like a good idea in your situation. You could always use a light tube to bring in daylight.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeSep 10th 2017
     
    Posted By: delpradoWindow is old double glazing and just looks at neighbours wall about 2m away. It's detached but houses are close together. Their dog is noisy also

    Windows let light in, provide ventilation and a means of escape. Well-sealed triple glazed windows keep out the noise of dogs barking fairly well. Our neighbours have some in their garden 3 m away from some of our windows sometimes. Windows with wider separation can work much better - consult an acoustic specialist for advice on the best glazing and separation.

    If you do decide to block it up, I'd be tempted to try to build a removable box to fill the reveal inside the window, filled with some sound-absorbent insulation. That way it would be reversible if you or any subsequent person decides they do prefer a window.
    •  
      CommentAuthornigel
    • CommentTimeSep 11th 2017
     
    In a let property all bedrooms must have natural light or environmental health will be able to take action.

    Also building regulations apply as all rooms must have a secondary means of escape.
    Making it worse than it is currently will therefore not be permissible.
    • CommentAuthorskyewright
    • CommentTimeSep 11th 2017
     
    Might an easily moved, soundproof, inner 'shutter' be a solution?
    You could decorate the inner face with the image of your choice.
  3.  
    ''You could decorate the inner face with the image of your choice.''

    A barking dog with a volume control?
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeSep 11th 2017
     
    nigel quoth: "Also building regulations apply as all rooms must have a secondary means of escape.
    Making it worse than it is currently will therefore not be permissible."

    Two documents that seem to have reasonable information about the actual requirements are:

    https://www.planningportal.co.uk/info/200130/common_projects/14/doors_and_windows/2
    https://www.modernupvcwindows.co.uk/brochures/fensa-guide---2014.pdf

    It does seem likely that replacing a window with a wall would fall foul of building regs and that you could only build a new bedroom without a window in particular circumstances.
    • CommentAuthorgyrogear
    • CommentTimeSep 11th 2017
     
    why not stick a board of 50mm XPS in it...

    gg
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeSep 11th 2017
     
    Posted By: gyrogearwhy not stick a board of 50mm XPS in it...

    Because XPS is not very good at absorbing the noise of dogs barking.
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTimeSep 13th 2017
     
    If the bedroom has an ensuite bathroom then I believe the fire escape can be via the ensuite bathroom window eliminating the need to have a fire escape in the bedroom. There must be a connecting door between the two as going via the landing/stairway to the bathroom wouldn't count as a second escape route.
    • CommentAuthorGreenfish
    • CommentTimeSep 13th 2017
     
    I have worked in offices without any windows or natural lighting, so it should be allowed for a home study. But it was not a nice work environment. :(

    I guess for planning you could claim it was a walk in cupboard, it depends on how big the room.
  4.  
    Re fire escape - does that still apply to new builds? From memory the opening window requirement on our building regs was related to floor area of the room (1/20th) and for ventilation rateher than egress. Surely fire brigade could break a glass pane quickly if needed (or window was locked, which regs require it to be if low to floor or insurance requires to be if accessible)

    I'm also fairly sure that new office building conversions are allowing windowless bedrooms so suspect ventilation is the building regs issue now (I'd guess mech ventilation is used)

    So nothing to stop you doing it and using it as an office but almost certain that you wont be able to market it as a bedroom in future when you sell.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeSep 14th 2017
     
    Posted By: Simon StillRe fire escape - does that still apply to new builds?

    Yes, please see Part B Section 2. The regs assume no assistance from the fire brigade or anybody else. They also specify the size of egress windows. Note that protected stairways are an alternative to egress windows, but they are not normal in most conventional houses, except loft conversions and other three-storey houses.

    There are other parts of the regs concerned with ventilation, security and thermal performance that impose other requirements in addition.
  5.  
    Posted By: djhNote that protected stairways are an alternative to egress windows, but they are not normal in most conventional houses, except loft conversions and other three-storey houses.


    That's why not required on our house then. 3 storey, protected stairway, 60 minute fire doors.
Add your comments

    Username Password
  • Format comments as
 
   
The Ecobuilding Buzz
Site Map    |   Home    |   View Cart    |   Pressroom   |   Business   |   Links   
Logout    

© Green Building Press