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  1.  
    I'd like to 'box out' a flue, but rather than making a square box, I'd like it to look a bit more elegant, say a curve. Any ideas how this might be possible? Obviously it has to be heat proof.
  2.  
    Something like this, but fireproof? http://www.marmox.co.uk/products/curved-board
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeSep 28th 2017
     
    Posted By: ComeOnPilgrimSomething like this, but curved? http://www.marmox.co.uk/products/curved-board

    I'm confused, that is curved?
  3.  
    Sorry @djh, it's been a long day! I meant fireproof (now edited above).
  4.  
    Shuttering in situ and concrete?

    Perhaps take inspiration for your shuttering from curved shower walls. There is a ply product available called "Flexible Plywood" which would give you a smooth curve.

    http://www.lathamtimber.co.uk/products/panels/flexi-products/flexible-plywood

    There is also a "slotted on the back" plywood available which I cannot find this morning, but you could always slot your own :-).

    There was a Grand Design with a wavy shower, and somebody on Buildhub did something similar (which I cannot find either). Pop over and ask?

    I suppose you *could* get a say 8ft diameter 1.2m concrete tunnel section and cut it lengthways in half, then put one on the other. But that sounds like hard work.

    Wickes also do a flexible MDF product: http://www.wickes.co.uk/Wickes-Flexible-MDF-Board-6-x-607-x-1220mm/p/190139


    Ferdinand
  5.  
    Ok. Direct solutions rather than shuttering.

    There is a product called Flexiboard, which is flexible plasterboard. That would be fireproof. eg
    https://vcut.co.uk/services/flexiboard/

    Then there are examples of curved stud wall (found the links):
    https://forum.buildhub.org.uk/topic/2014-curved-wall/
    http://www.ebuild.co.uk/blog/16/entry-319-wanna-see-a-well-built-stud-take-on-something-curvy/

    If you build such a curved stud wall out of one of the metal systems, and use flexiboard, you may just have what you need ... depending on temperatures etc.

    Or you could of course use curved bricks, or carve Durisol blocks with a chainsaw.

    Ferdinand
    • CommentAuthorgravelld
    • CommentTimeSep 29th 2017 edited
     
    Imprinted concrete, like they did on the GD in the old cinema (I think)?

    Or am I not allowed to say concrete for such frivolous uses? :devil:
    • CommentAuthorBeau
    • CommentTimeSep 29th 2017
     
    You could kerf some ply and put a heatproof liner on the inside?
  6.  
    You can do a lot with various beeding and dado rail used in various combinations.
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeSep 30th 2017
     
    What is the flue made of?, e.g. is it a stainless insulated one, or a more utilitarian uninsulated one. Is it in a corner or placed more centrally against a flat wall. Presumably it's for a wood burning stove?
  7.  
    The curves in our place were made with lath and plaster. I guess the modern equivalent would be expanded-metal lath, bent to curve over metal studs and plastered?
  8.  
    Posted By: ferdinand2000Ok. Direct solutions rather than shuttering.

    There is a product called Flexiboard, which is flexible plasterboard. That would be fireproof. eg
    https://vcut.co.uk/services/flexiboard/" rel="nofollow" >https://vcut.co.uk/services/flexiboard/

    Then there are examples of curved stud wall (found the links):
    https://forum.buildhub.org.uk/topic/2014-curved-wall/" rel="nofollow" >https://forum.buildhub.org.uk/topic/2014-curved-wall/
    http://www.ebuild.co.uk/blog/16/entry-319-wanna-see-a-well-built-stud-take-on-something-curvy/" rel="nofollow" >http://www.ebuild.co.uk/blog/16/entry-319-wanna-see-a-well-built-stud-take-on-something-curvy/

    If you build such a curved stud wall out of one of the metal systems, and use flexiboard, you may just have what you need ... depending on temperatures etc.

    Or you could of course use curved bricks, or carve Durisol blocks with a chainsaw.

    Ferdinand


    Those are great! the flexiboard looks just the ticket. I was also thinking about cutting grooves in a semi-flexible cement board like Knauf Aquapanel (the external one) so I could render on top of it.
  9.  
    Posted By: owlmanhttps://forum.buildhub.org.uk/topic/2014-curved-wall/


    It's a stainless steel twin wall flue.
  10.  
    Actually, I spoke to someone from British Gypsum today, and they said that it's not a good idea to use plasterboard where it's going to get hot as they said all the water would be driven out of it, and it would turn into plaster of Paris.
  11.  
    I'm struggling a little to find a metal framing system that would be suitable. Most are cheap, but quite thick. I'll only be putting boarding on one side, and not using insulation. Even a 50mm one is a bit unnecessary.

    Perhaps I could just get some kind of box section and a bracket for the top and bottom?
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeOct 1st 2017
     
    The reason I asked about the flue type etc. was to get a better idea of how to advise. Twin wall does still get hot and it seems a shame to hide that heating potential behind some solid structure. It is to some extent attractive in it's own right. I know it's all within the home envelope.
    If it's for the area directly above the stove connection, then solid it may look a bit odd and difficult at the bottom end.
    If it's in an upper room where a the flue has passed through e.g. the first floor that may be different.
    Instead of trying to hide it with a solid half cylinder type structure you could consider getting a length of perforated stainless sheet rolled into a half cylinder, or "U" shape big enough to "wrap" the flue from wall to wall. Paint all behind it matt black except the SS flue and you could have something sculptural,-- and if you're clever with fixings removable,-- a feature that sill took advantage if the flue heat.
    Or use the same idea in mild steel and powder coat it to your taste.
    If you're stuck on something solid looking then use "U" shaped steel bands back to the wall and fix something like long Fermacell strips to it.
  12.  
    Thanks @owlman, it's for the first floor where it passed through a bedroom. I understand that it needs some sort of protection to prevent something flammable coming within the 50mm required distance to flammables. It does get warm and I agree, it would be a shame to lose the heat. We have a Selkirk heat shield / support between the floors and I understand that the void between the flue and the boxing out has to be ventilated top and bottom with 4 x 125mm diameter vents. (Interestingly, these must ask face down and into the void. No idea why. Seems like a recipe for dust). A metal shield or similar might be a nice alternative idea, with similar sized vents.
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeOct 2nd 2017
     
    Stainless steel perforated sheet is widely available, the sort with round holes at varying pitch that would easily meet any ventilation criterion. Perforaters can do it to order e.g. a 8' x 4' with a wide plain strip on each of the long sides to allow bolted fastenings to angled steel strips connected to the wall left and right of the flue. Structurally it's a piece of cake to do and easily solves any future maintenance issues.
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTimeOct 4th 2017
     
    I remember a similar question before and perforated stainless steel was the answer that time.
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