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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

PLEASE NOTE: A download link for Volume 1 will be sent to you by email and Volume 2 will be sent to you by post as a book.

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  1.  
    Posted By: gyrogearthey are nice piles o' stone, Pile-o-Stone

    (Wales by any chance ?)

    gg


    Hey gg, the larger gabions are 1m high x 1m deep x 2m long so they do hold a huge pile of stone!! I try and build a stone wall at the front of the gabions so they’re not pushing against the wire. It’s knackering work as some of them are pretty big (and I have to sit in the gabion cage to do it) but it’s worth the effort for the security of knowing they’ll not all fall into the stream if the cage is compromised, plus my drystone walling skills are coming on in leaps and bounds. 😊

    I’m in the South Pennines just on the Yorkshire border, so very similar to the Welsh hills.
  2.  
    Posted By: marktimeA couple of things, you could place stage lighting filters over the light fittings to control colour and brilliance.

    Love the stream profiling: is there a flash flood risk that you have to consider?

    Mmmm... I mght be showing my ignorance here but what is that circular structure in the back corner for?


    Thanks marktime, I’ll maybe have a look at colour changing led bulbs to make the fireplace lighting look a little more interesting. I don’t want to go too futuristic though as the mill was built in the 1700s so I want to keep it traditional looking.

    Thanks for your comment about the stream, we are in the Calder valley which is an area very susceptible to flooding. We had Boxing Day floods in the village a couple of years back, and while our house was ok, the brook was a torrent and almost overflowed into the garden. A big chunk of the bank was washed away, almost taking the garden path with it. I fitted the original gabions to replace the bank and to stabilise the path. The stones in the gabions came out of the stream and really helped lower the height of the water.

    The circular structure is a galvanised raised bed (I’ve updated my earlier posts with some info - I originally updated my blog using my iPhone while lying on the floor of our potting shed trying to straighten my back after digging and moving stones and I’ve tidied things up now I’m on my iPad).

    The pic shows how the raised beds look from the front with measurements. They’re really deep so you fill the bottom with logs and branches, then a layer of top soil then a layer of compost. The bottom layer of brushwood helps with drainage and as the wood rots its supposed to release heat and nutrients. The technique is from Germany and is called “ Hügelkultur”. I saw it on this amazing YouTube channel, Self Sufficient Me : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3O2qCQU7Cac&feature=share
      70E34F45-18AB-48B4-AA43-7B2D431A371C.jpeg
  3.  
    Posted By: Pile-o-StonePosted By: gyrogearthey are nice piles o' stone, Pile-o-Stone

    +1.......I recall another thread where someone was asking if it was worth building your own gabions and the general consensus was that it would not be because of the work......there are however exceptions.

    Posted By: Pile-o-Stonethe larger gabions are 1m high x 1m deep x 2m long so they do hold a huge pile of stone!! I try and build a stone wall at the front of the gabions so they’re not pushing against the wire. It’s knackering work as some of them are pretty big (and I have to sit in the gabion cage to do it) but it’s worth the effort for the security of knowing they’ll not all fall into the stream if the cage is compromised, plus my drystone walling skills are coming on in leaps and bounds. 😊

    I’m in the South Pennines just on the Yorkshire border, so very similar to the Welsh hills.


    Not to put a damper on that amount of (hard) labour but who owns the stream bed and are there any bureaucratic implications that could stand up and bite you in the bum at a later stage?
  4.  
    Posted By: Peter_in_HungaryNot to put a damper on that amount of (hard) labour but who owns the stream bed and are there any bureaucratic implications that could stand up and bite you in the bum at a later stage?


    Valid concerns, especially in light of the solar panel hassle I had with the council. I have permission from the environment agency to install the gabions, and they have had a look at the ones I installed originally and were happy with them. The centre of the stream is the border of our land.
  5.  
    Magic !!
  6.  
    Slowly getting there. I’ve installed the final gabion and now need to stain the fence, level everything off and move the potting shed onto the gabion and new land I’ve reclaimed from the stream bank.

    Once that's completed I'm going to run some steps down the side of the gabions so we can get down the narrow banking next to the stream, initially to help us fill the watering cans from the stream, but then later to put some decking and a bench down there on the bank so we can have a nice sit down in summer next to the brook.
      0669DF00-3043-4FC3-8E5B-B80E87524ACB.jpeg
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