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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
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    • CommentAuthoradam_w
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2018
     
    Posted By: djhMy plan if and when I need to replace a frame is to unscrew the box from the sub-frames and then take out the box and window together. Yes, there'll be a mess but there'll be a mess anyway and it's hopefully a rare event.


    The problem with this in my build is that removing the boxes would then irreversibly damage the flashing so I don't think I left with any other option other than to secure from the inside out but thank you both for your opinions and experiences with this matter, I really appreciate it :bigsmile:
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2018
     
    Oh, the other thing I forgot to mention was plan B. The only reason I can think of to take a frame out is because it's damaged beyond repair. If that is the case then I really don't care what condition it's in after I take it out. So I might leave the box in place and just cut the frame out in pieces.
    • CommentAuthoradam_w
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2018
     
    Good point Dave. Would you employ this tactic for doors as well?
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2018
     
    If I remember rightly, we screwed the door frames to the sub-frames using conventional metal straps, so the question doesn't arise. But the same principle should apply I think. Again, I can't think of many reasons for replacing a door frame.
    • CommentAuthoradam_w
    • CommentTimeAug 3rd 2018
     
    Guys,

    Can I get your input on my plans for the external sub DPC insulation/drainage please? I have a narrow corridor between my extension and my neighbours that could become a water trap so I'm proposing the following, could you let me know your thought please?

    Thanks,

    Adam
      DRAINAGE.jpg
    • CommentAuthoradam_w
    • CommentTime7 days ago
     
    Any advice would be greatly appreciated :D
    • CommentAuthorgyrogear
    • CommentTime7 days ago
     
    do you mean "gravel" instead of "shingle" ?

    gg
  1.  
    What is the 'french drain' in the sketch? The whole of the shingle and drain pipe would be the french drain. For the pipe I would suggest perforated land drain pipe. Some put geotex membrane on the outside of the trench to stop the shingle getting dirt washed in. I'm not sure about this (a question to ask) perhaps the membrane would get clogged just as quickly as the shingle.

    There is no thermal break between the slab and the outside world so a cold bridge here, if you have enough space continue the 80mm EPS down to the footings and put the drainage pipe outside of this, continuing down the 100mm EPS would be better. (land drain pipe comes in various dia. probably 50mm would be sufficient). If it is only to prevent a water trap and not to cater for rain water flow then a 50mm gap with 50mm pipe in the bottom back filled with pea shingle would work.

    Where is the floor insulation, above or below the slab?

    Why coat the cement board with flexacril (or any at all) Cement board that I have used has been impervious to anything and I have some as a roof sheeting for over 20 years with no deterioration.

    Do you have somewhere for the french drain to outflow, otherwise you will create a moat.
    • CommentAuthoradam_w
    • CommentTime7 days ago edited
     
    Hi PIH,

    Thanks for your response. To clarify, what I meant by French drain was a perforated pipe with a geotextile membrane, that's what I've used in behind the retaining wall in the garden. This would then feed in to my drainage system along with the drain pipes. I planned to use shingle as I thought this was the correct thing for surrounding drainage, I guess shingle could be used on the top layers and it'll look neater too.

    With regards to the thermal break, I would prefer to run the EPS to the bottom of the foundation but I was concerned about moisture accumulation as the bottom hence why I thought it may be best to have the perforated pipe under it but if its not the case then I will happily change my design to go all the way down.

    The room that this detail abuts is a garage so technically I don't need to worry about floor insulation but I would like to do things better where I can.

    The flexacryl on the cement board was for nothing other than aesthetics, it looks better than bare concrete and its very slippery so very little dirty will adhere to it.

    I think that's all your comments addressed but I would appreciated further clarification on the perforated pipe detail if possible?

    Thanks again,

    Adam
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTime7 days ago
     
    It's typical to use shingle (specifically pea shingle) around underground pipes because this type of rounded gravel can move easily to relieve pressure from ground movement without affecting the pipe. Sharp or angular gravel tends to lock together and form a more rigid structure, so the surface can support more load. Sharp gravels are also more uncomfortable for animals to walk on, so they can discourage some pests.

    You can carry the EPS down to the bottom of the drain; it won't mind about getting wet from time to time.

    I'm not clear where ground level is. On the left, it appears to be at the same level as the DPC, which is unusual. It's usual to have the DPC 150 mm or so above ground level, except where level entrances are built up. But the garage floor appears to be lower, if there are no other layers not shown in the drawing?
  2.  
    The land drain to which I referred is shown here
    https://www.ebay.co.uk/bhp/land-drain-pipe
    As djh said it is usual to use pea shingle around pipes and for land drains this shingle forms part of the land drain. Indeed a ditch filled with shingle would act as a land drain without a pipe, the pipe just aids the flow.

    Also as djh sais EPS is very tolerant of getting wet, won't degrade and loses very little insulative quality as a result of being wet.
    • CommentAuthoradam_w
    • CommentTime6 days ago
     
    Morning!

    Thanks for the replies, I think I'm nearing a solution now.

    Firstly to explain the levels, everything is as you say Dave, garage floor at ground level, DPC 150mm above that, the raised plane on the left hand side of the drawing is my neighbours small, tapering retaining wall as shown below during the early stages of the build;

    From what you are all saying, I can run the EPS all the way down to the top of the footings, providing I stop the cement board a little short to allow for draining into the perforated pipe and then back-fill with pea shingle to the ground level, is that a correct interpretation of your collective feedback?

    Thanks again,

    Adam
      20180407_183948.jpg
    • CommentAuthoradam_w
    • CommentTime2 days ago
     
    Afternoon All,

    Just for clarification, is this what we're all thinking;

    Thanks,

    Adam
      DRAINAGE-2.jpg
  3.  
    looks about right!
    A bit of a cold bridge between the slab, the footings and the outside world.
    • CommentAuthoradam_w
    • CommentTime1 day ago
     
    Thanks Peter.

    Do you think I would be able to terminate a drain pipe above the shingle so any water from the guttering could also feed in?

    Thanks,

    Adam
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTime1 day ago
     
    Posted By: adam_wDo you think I would be able to terminate a drain pipe above the shingle so any water from the guttering could also feed in?

    That's exactly what we do. Clearly a good discharge from the French drain is even more important! IIRC the rules say that water from the roof must be led away from the building, but my building inspector was OK with our arrangement.
    • CommentAuthoradam_w
    • CommentTime1 day ago
     
    Perfect, thanks Dave!
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