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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
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    • CommentAuthorcjard
    • CommentTime6 days ago edited
     
    I've often mused that, because my window frames are grey, those strips of magnetic tape with a sticky back would go relatively unnoticed. As the recess between my frame and the glass is quite deep, 25 mm or so, I reckon I could quite effectively apply a tertiary glaze by having sheets of Perspex perimeter lined with the same self adhesive mag strip, and sticking them into place when I want them (winter) or removing them when I don't (summer, decondense!. Further, around half my glazing is actually sheltered (something like a conservatory) so I could tertiary glaze it externally or even quad glaze
    By doing both sides

    Perspex sheets look to be around 20£ per sqm, so I'd be looking at around 1000 quid to do the windows. The roof glazing might add another grand

    In terms of house heating costs, I don't have a great idea of what my heating costs to run because we haven't been charting it long. Broadly speaking it looks like 30kWh/day in heating season and 20kwh/day out of it.

    I've nearly 100sqm of glazing, not worried about the walls/roof as they're around 200/300mm of kingspan; it's the glazing that is the loss path I think

    So, handwaving generalised values; is there any worth (money saving) in applying a system of tertiary glazing? I didn't buy triple at the time for several reasons including weight and price (quotes 50% more). As well as the money actor, there's a comfort factor too, as the bedrooms at 16 degrees cause a lot of complaints from the boss even though I like it: is adding another layer of immobilised air likely to appreciably improve the insulative value of the glazing (as compared to argon filled triple)?
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTime6 days ago
     
    Posted By: cjardIn terms of house heating costs, I don't have a great idea of what my heating costs to run because we haven't been charting it long. Broadly speaking it looks like 30kWh/day in heating season and 20kwh/day out of it.

    That doesn't sound right. Firstly the ratio doesn't sound big enough and secondly what is the heating out of the heating season? If you're saying you have 20 kWh/day of standing consumption plus 10 kWh/day of heating I'd say you have way too high standing consumption and an unbelievably low heating bill.

    So, handwaving generalised values; is there any worth (money saving) in applying a system of tertiary glazing?

    I doubt it. When I did the sums for our previous, single-glazed house it wasn't even worth doing double glazing. I did bunches of experiments with film double-glazing and with blocks of polystyrene at the windows but didn't reach any conclusions. Personally, I'd go for heavy, lined curtains.
  1.  
    I'd agree with djh - 30kWh per day in heating season is really quite low for a "normal" house. Just as a comparison, I have a 6 bed detached house, fairly well insulated and double glazed etc, in the London suburbs. Depths of Winter the heating is about 100kWh per day. In the Summer its zero - no heating May/June/July/Aug/Sept. Average gas use is 44kWh per day over the year, but that inludes HW and cooking.

    Triple Glazing is often used in Scandinavia where they put in the 3rd layer of glazing for the winter. In the UK, if you've already got decent DG, I can't see it being worth the money or the faff.
    • CommentAuthorGarethC
    • CommentTime4 days ago
     
    What's the pane u value of your existing DG cjard? If it's 1.8, then adding a plastic pane with 20mm gap should reduce it to 1.3 according to my wee calculator. So 28% less. Not insignificant.

    Isn't 100 square metres an awful lot of glazing? Seems it to me although I'm in a (big) flat.
    • CommentAuthorgyrogear
    • CommentTime18 hours ago
     
    Posted By: cjardBroadly speaking it looks like 30kWh/day in heating season and 20kwh/day out of it.


    Hope I'm not hijacking the topic, but this is interesting: it corresponds pretty closely to *my* electricity usage: 28 kWh/day in heating period, and 18 kWh/day rest of year. (132 days x 28) + (233 days x 18) = 7890 kWh/year (for 190 m2).

    However, we use wood heating on top, which comes out to 28 kWh/day also x 132 days = 3696 kWh / 2100 kWh/load = 1.76 loads x 100 Euros = 176 Euros for heating. Same electric would cost 630 Euros. Therefore I save 454 Euros a year by burning wood. This pays for one-half of our petrol bill.

    Since we use very little electric heating (basically zero), I have often wondered why the electric bill evolves so: I suspect one part of it is the DHW tank, "warming the house"; and also more heated towel-rail usage. Nonetheless, I suspect that the major element is electric lighting: because "heating season" corresponds to "gloomy season", and we *do* tend to burn a lot of light, despite our best efforts...

    Returning (finally...) to the subject of glazing, a ceiling fan might be a good way of dragging that high-up warm air off of the glass...

    +1 for the curtains also...

    gg
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