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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

PLEASE NOTE: A download link for Volume 1 will be sent to you by email and Volume 2 will be sent to you by post as a book.

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    • CommentAuthordelprado
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2017 edited
     
    I don’t want to supply my cinema room as I’m keen to keep sound isolated in there. Surely fresh air will find its way in there somehow?
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2017
     
    If you're keen to isolate sound then you'll want to keep the door closed and seal its edges etc. In which case, no, fresh air won't find its way in, nor stale air find its way out. I'd suggest a better plan is to install MVHR but use attenuators in the duct work etc. Perhaps take advice from one of the specialist firms as to what works best.
    • CommentAuthorjfb
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2017
     
    Put it in but turn MVhr off/low when watching a film?
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2017
     
    How about using a plenum box with large outlets - slow air flow - minimum noise

    We never hear our MVHR when watching movies or chatting with friends
    • CommentAuthorsam_cat
    • CommentTimeDec 11th 2017
     
    <blockquote><cite>Posted By: jfb</cite>Put it in but turn MVhr off/low when watching a film?</blockquote>


    My guess is that the noise of the MVHR isnt the issue, but instead trying to keep the noise from the home cinema contained in that room and not spilling into other rooms via the ducts.
  1.  
    If you're using semi rigid ducting (ie rooms connected to central point rather than each other) I think the noise transmission from room to room is going to be really negligible. I'd be amazed if you managed to soundproof the direct sound transmission enough that it was worth worrying about.
    • CommentAuthordelprado
    • CommentTimeDec 11th 2017
     
    Hi All

    Thanks for your thought s- yes, as sam_cat says its not the noise of the MHVR I am worried about, its the noise going out - specifically low frequency as my intention in this room was to run the duct straight into upstairs bedroom hidden in a wardrobe - so irrespective of attenuation it renders the other extreme measures I am thinking about going to (new suspended ceiling or at least resilient bars, etc, acoustic door) pointless.

    I wonder if its possible to have some sort of high mass door you can cover the outlet with when watching a load film or something?
    • CommentAuthorMike1
    • CommentTimeDec 11th 2017
     
    Posted By: djhI'd suggest a better plan is to install MVHR but use attenuators in the duct work etc.

    I agree; talk to attenuator manufacturers to get one suitable.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeDec 11th 2017
     
    Posted By: delpradospecifically low frequency as my intention in this room was to run the duct straight into upstairs bedroom hidden in a wardrobe

    Wrap the duct with Tecsound or something, then wrap in high density acoustic wool and encase in a couple of layers of acoustic plasterboard bonded with AC50 at the back of a wardrobe full of clothes and I doubt you would hear much. But the specialists will be able to tell you for sure.
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