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    • CommentAuthormarsaday
    • CommentTimeDec 15th 2017
     
    Hi, i am building a shed in the garden and also building an extension at the moment. The extension is on hold until next spring, so i am now doing the shed.

    Both have single pitch mono roofs.

    I am planning on using a box profile steel roof as seen in the first link. This seems pretty easy to fit and it just screws into the OSB sheets laid over the roof joists + membrane.

    I have also been looking into a metal roof system for my extension roof and was thinking something from Vieo would be good.

    My question for the roofers is, what is the difference between these two metal roof systems ?

    The vieo roof requires a seam machine to be hired and the sheets are costing £30 sqm. The caldco roof is much cheaper. Maybe it is the style which wouldn't suit an older house's new extension.

    Info appreciated on these systems.

    https://www.cladco.co.uk/products/box-profile-341000-sheets-roofing-and-cladding

    http://www.euroclad.com/roofs/vieo-roof-profile/
    • CommentAuthorFred56
    • CommentTimeDec 15th 2017
     
    Is it a matter of scale whe you consider profile sheet? The large profiles would look out of proportion on small roof. They are intended for big industrial units rather than buildings the size of a houses. The standing seam roofs would probably look more "in scale" to domestic applications. If the sheets are continuous you won't get the cut edge corrosion issue I see on most surveys I do on big box section roofs.
    What about smaller scale stuff like Decra?
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeDec 15th 2017
     
    What is the warranty and what underlay is required?

    Our roof is aluminium Vieo, FWIW. Mainly because it can be used on curved roofs (a barrel vault). One thing I like about it is that there are absolutely no penetrations through the aluminium. Most of the corrugated roofs depend on sealing lots of screw holes. Plus of course steel corrodes more easily than aluminium.

    There is a simple hand-operated seaming tool as well as the electric one, if you're planning to DIY.
    • CommentAuthormarsaday
    • CommentTimeDec 15th 2017
     
    I am planning on DIY. Interesting you have a Vieo roof. This was my first port of call, but since i have been looking at the shed roof i have realised there may be some alternatives.

    Did you fit the Vieo roof ? How is it attached to the roof timbers ?

    My extension roof will be 6.5m wide x 6m.

    I will have a look at Decra.

    Not sure about the warranty and the underlay i will use will be the same material i wrap the walls in, so a breathable one.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeDec 15th 2017
     
    Posted By: marsadayDid you fit the Vieo roof ? How is it attached to the roof timbers ?

    My roof is curved, as I mentioned, so I got a firm in to install it. They planned to use the electric seaming machine but it couldn't cope with the curve, so they finished up having to do it all by hand. Some interesting acrobatics! Euroclad were a bit of a pain to deal with, BTW.

    Standing seam roofs need a solid deck underneath them - 18 mm of ply in my case - and the Vieo ones are held down by clips that are screwed down to the deck first, and then folded into the seams as thay are formed.

    You can't use a normal wall underlay - there are special 'metal' ones. There needs to be a small space under the metal to allow drainage (of condensation that can form in some conditions).
    • CommentAuthorBeau
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2017 edited
     
    Posted By: Fred56If the sheets are continuous you won't get the cut edge corrosion issue I see on most surveys I do on big box section roofs.
    What about smaller scale stuff like Decra?


    Cant comment on anything but the profile sheets from Cladco. I have been using their sheets for 15 years or so and not had any cut edge corrosion that's drawn attention to itself. It's only on our barns but couldn't fault it.

    Wish our local planning would have let us use it on our barn conversion. Ended up with 3000 slates from Brazil which which took weeks to instal when 44 profile sheets from just up the road and couple of days work and it would have been done.
    • CommentAuthormarsaday
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2017
     
    Yes on the metal roof condensation will occur. So on my shed roof, i thought to lay the tyvek stuff over my osb sheets. Then the metal goes over and just screws into the deck. No one at the supplier has mentioned a special membrane to use.
  1.  
    Posted By: marsadayYes on the metal roof condensation will occur. So on my shed roof, i thought to lay the tyvek stuff over my osb sheets. Then the metal goes over and just screws into the deck. No one at the supplier has mentioned a special membrane to use.

    I think I would contrive a gap between the metal roof and the membrane for ease of drainage otherwise water will be held where the metal and the membrane touch. (counter battens of some sort come to mind)
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2017
     
    Posted By: marsadayThen the metal goes over and just screws into the deck. No one at the supplier has mentioned a special membrane to use.

    You're talking about corrugated metal, yes? They form a natural gap. It's only standing seam that needs more. And definitely no battens - the roof needs continuous support, as I said, and it doesn't need as much gap as battens would provide in any case.
    • CommentAuthormarsaday
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2017
     
    Yes talking about the shed roof, so corrugated.

    So i think my tyvek sheet over the osb board is a winner.

    With regards to the extension roof i need to do some more reading on the other Vieo product.
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeDec 18th 2017 edited
     
    I hate all larger-scale 'box section' profiles, love traditional 'corrugated iron' https://www.cladco.co.uk/products/corrugated-profile-133-roofing-and-cladding which forms a sine wave of 3" c/cs x 3/4" total height, is available in 0.7mm thickness and colour coated, so a very different durability product compared to typical rusting agricultural corrugated.

    It can have an anti-drip (condensation) flock underside finish but that's not necessary if copious through-ventilation is provided beneath the sheet, as should be under any kind of impremeable rainscreen.

    With that, corrugated is visually good for almost any secondary extension to a traditional building - look around, see numerous examples - which even e.g. Dartmoor National Park Planners will go with. And for more modern or new buildings, can look great.

    As corrugated is so fine, and cheap, it beats me why anyone pays the cost and hassle of standing seam metal roofing.
    • CommentAuthormarsaday
    • CommentTimeDec 18th 2017 edited
     
    Thanks for input Tom.

    I spoke to cladco but because they are in Devon their transport cost is almost the same as the product cost. So i have to find someone up here in Yorkshire.

    It seems really easy to fit as well and i am going to be using a similar product on my shed as a test and then next summer i will be getting the roof on my extension.

    Here is a pic of the extension so far. I have stopped now as i would need to take off the roof and back patio doors to get it all in and so am waiting now until the spring to start again.

    The house is 1910 and i am doing reclaimed brick with lime mortar. Was thinking about a fibre glass roof, but i think metal is a better option now. The pitch is going to be about 12 degrees, but i want to be able to stand on it to service the gutters above. The snow stopper needs to be renewed and so i will be doing this after the extension is finished.

    Still doing lots of research. The Planning dev rights say i have to build the extension in similar materials. So i hope a metal roof will be acceptable.

    I will be having about 4 x fixed roof lights near the back of the roof to get light into the house.
      IMG_1157 copy.jpg
    • CommentAuthorSilky
    • CommentTimeDec 18th 2017
     
    I was also considering standing seam as the idea of having long continuous sections without any penetrations is attractive, both my barn and garage have corrugated cement board and the vast majority of the screw points have failed in 20-30 years and it has become an on-going maintenance problem. My main house and other outbuildings have clay tile roofs ( clip together variety ), while generally excellent they are also prone to occasional failures. When my new roof goes on the house the entire build will be extremely expensive and I'm worried about an unseen drip into the new insulation. Any advocates of standing seam to defend the idea?
    • CommentAuthormarsaday
    • CommentTimeDec 18th 2017
     
    Interesting about the screw points leaking. Puts me off using this for the extension, but the shed will be ok i think.
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeDec 18th 2017
     
    Do screw points really leak? They're always on the crown of the section, from which water drains away, and even wind-blown kinda bounces off rather than waiting to be blown into any crack. I dare say a flat-topped box section would be more vulnerable than a sharply-curved crown, like with corrugated iron.

    Could leaking screw points actually be about porous corrosion around the hole?
    • CommentAuthorSilky
    • CommentTimeDec 18th 2017
     
    on my house they leak, originally each screw had a rubber flange that holds a rubber cap to keep the screw covered, over time many of the screw caps have simply gone and the flanges have cracked. I'm also in a fairly sheltered location. In the past I built one of those metal sheet garden sheds in England, this had plastic sealing washers under the screws, in the 1st year I had to fix scores of them which were dripping water inside. So in my mind any penetration through the sheet is a risk, especially when it will be difficult to detect leaks at a later time ( the problem with adding roof insulation ).

    With the current heavy clay tiles I had 2 tiny holes in the middle of tiles, sort of 1/2 pence size if you remember them. I don't know how they got there, quality problems, ice, birds pecking on the roof?? But one of these holes went unfixed by the previous owner and destroyed several sqm of floor and a couple of beams, it was hidden behind part of the roof frame. But with decent eyesight it's quite easy to find these things now. Later there will be boarding top/bottom, between rafter insulation and then a top insulation panel, so they will be impossible to find from the inside and almost impossible to find outside too.. hence the thoughts to metal.. or maybe there is a reason why we use slate in the UK, could that be the answer?
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeDec 18th 2017
     
    I think you were exceedingly unlucky - but alarming - anyone else had similar?
    • CommentAuthormike7
    • CommentTimeDec 18th 2017 edited
     
    Re corrosion on cut edges of profile sheet - could be caused by cutting with abrasive disc, which burns off galvanising back from the cut edge and prevents the protective galvanic action that would protect the steel from rusting. Manufacturers warn against this, but...

    Re leaks on corrugated sheet I have loads of agricultural 6in roofing and some 3in, all at least 45yrs old and have had no trouble at all of this kind despite my tender loving neglect for the last 25 yrs. Sounds like Silky's troubles were due to poor quality seals, perhaps imported from some distant land in a hurry to industrialise 30 yrs or so ago. Galvanised fastenings aren't always what they used to be either - even though hot dipped they manage to spin off most of the zinc so the result is hardly better sometimes than zinc electroplating.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeDec 19th 2017
     
    I've certainly seen leaks through screw holes in corrugated roofing - we got into an argument with a landlord about one such problem, eventually resolved in our favour by a surveyor the landlord engaged.

    I certainly believe in the lack of holes in standing seam, although we've only been in for two and a bit years, so it's probably a bit too soon for me to be giving unequivocal praise.
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeDec 19th 2017
     
    Well, a railscreen over a copiously through-ventilated void over breather felt on board can afford to leak a bit! That system's got to deal with sometimes large amounts of condensate anyway.
    • CommentAuthorretrofrit
    • CommentTimeDec 19th 2017
     
    Was thinking of using Euroclad earlier this year & went on a free short training session, very low key but quite sufficient.

    Well thought so but never put it into practice as the occupant decided they needed a rooflight and that's tricky with this type of roof as there's so much movement, ended up with rubber.
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