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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
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  1.  
    We'd like to use reclaimed floorboards on our upper floors. No UFH, though some kind of sound deadening material would be good as they'll be laid on OSB (Smartply) which is on top of metal web joists. We were thinking of getting t&g to minimise problems with movement and to minimise dirt getting trapped.

    On the ground floor we have a lime slab with UFH, so I guess we'll have to go with some kind of engineered board. The slab is a bit uneven, and we'd prefer to keep it somewhat breathable if possible.

    Does anybody have any experience with this kind of thing who would be happy to offer advice?

    Compliments of the season to everybody!
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeDec 26th 2017
     
    Upstairs I would not bother with t&g, sound deadening, you should have rock wool between the ceiling and floor 9building regs requirement) after that a thin butyl membrane might help reduce impact noises. Seal,all gaps in the OSB holes edges, joined, indeed I would use t&g OSB and foam the edges, foaming glue the joins.

    Downstairs, are you sure? If you are I would buy a humidity monitor and leave it a couple years.
  2.  
    Thanks @tony. We already have wood fibre between floors and the sound deadening is quite good, but you can hear the impact. I was thinking some kind of membrane must help. I also thought t&g would help with fitting.

    Why avoid engineered board on the ground floor?

    Thanks for your advice.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeDec 26th 2017
     
    anything on the g/f made of wood needs to wait a good while before being installed, need to wait for all moisture to go and settle down, living in it with heating will help, monitor to be certain, a mistake would be expensive and heartbreaking.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeDec 27th 2017
     
    Posted By: ComeOnPilgrimOn the ground floor we have a lime slab with UFH, so I guess we'll have to go with some kind of engineered board. The slab is a bit uneven, and we'd prefer to keep it somewhat breathable if possible.

    We went with packers & battens with a caberdeck top over our concrete slab. The alternative was a screed and I wanted to avoid wet trades as much as possible. We have bamboo glued to the chipboard in most areas, carpet in others and some vinyl. The slab had been down just over a year before we laid the flooring.

    A very good way to avoid impact noise from upstairs is to use a soft finish like carpet and underlay rather than boards. Underlays/membranes can help, also acoustic screedboards. Suspending the ceiling from resilient bars also helps. Not wearing hard footwear upstairs is also good.
  3.  
    Posted By: djh
    Posted By: ComeOnPilgrimOn the ground floor we have a lime slab with UFH, so I guess we'll have to go with some kind of engineered board. The slab is a bit uneven, and we'd prefer to keep it somewhat breathable if possible.

    We went with packers & battens with a caberdeck top over our concrete slab. The alternative was a screed and I wanted to avoid wet trades as much as possible. We have bamboo glued to the chipboard in most areas, carpet in others and some vinyl. The slab had been down just over a year before we laid the flooring.

    Thanks @djh, so you leveled the floor using shims essentially. Sounds like quite a lot of work?
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeDec 31st 2017
     
    Posted By: ComeOnPilgrimThanks @djh, so you leveled the floor using shims essentially. Sounds like quite a lot of work?

    Didn't seem it at the time. I don't remember how long it took - a day or two I suppose. Two carpenters. The main complication was getting levels to match the external doors and the wetroom shower former and setting the subfloor levels in each room so the finished floors were level depending on the surface treatment (carpet, vinyl, bamboo).
  4.  
    I've been in contact with a few second hand timber floor suppliers. They've all said that I should glue the boards to sheets of ply. I'm a bit unhappy about that idea, both in terms of the glue, and the possibility of recycling them in the future. What do others think?
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