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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

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    • CommentAuthorrevor
    • CommentTimeJan 4th 2018
     
    Seems that to confirm with Building regs I need to paint the structural steel of my atrium with fire paint or fix fire rated plasterboard. Being the confirming type I will do what BCO requires however when I asked what was the science behind how a layer of paint could protect the steel for 30 mins I got no reason. It seems totally illogical to me that a special paint can prevent a non combustible material from damage. Timber yes steel no . The reason for protection I guess is to avoid the building collapsing due to distortion of the steel by heat. I can see that plasterboard can "afford protection" I cannot get it how paint can afford similar protection. Can anyone enlighten me please.
    • CommentAuthorgyrogear
    • CommentTimeJan 4th 2018
     
    look up "intumescent"

    gg
  1.  
    First off I’d question why he is asking you to fireproof your atrium. What is the requirement for you to do so? Does it support anything other than the roof? Is it just to the ground floor? Like,hood is (without knowing more) there is no requirement....
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTimeJan 5th 2018
     
    In a fire I believe steel beams frequently fail before wooden beams. The argument is that steel looses it's strength at high temperatures where as wood chars forming an insulating layer that protects the core of the beam for longer. I suspect intumescent paint was actually invented to mimic the effect of the chared outer layer of wood.
    • CommentAuthorrevor
    • CommentTimeJan 5th 2018
     
    <blockquote><cite>Posted By: mattwprice</cite>First off I’d question why he is asking you to fireproof your atrium. What is the requirement for you to do so? Does it support anything other than the roof? Is it just to the ground floor? Like,hood is (without knowing more) there is no requirement....</blockquote>

    Good question which I need to pose to the BCO. The Atrium is an add on to the gable end of the house enclosing a mezzanine floor. Originally the mezzanine floor was to be a balcony but during our build the weather was so bad we realised that the balcony would not be used that often so got further planning permission for the Atrium.
    So the steel supports the roof and the mezzanine floor. In one sense it is not a habitable room but more so than say other non habitable rooms e.g. bathrooms

    <blockquote><cite>Posted By: CWatters</cite>In a fire I believe steel beams frequently fail before wooden beams. The argument is that steel looses it's strength at high temperatures where as wood chars forming an insulating layer that protects the core of the beam for longer. I suspect intumescent paint was actually invented to mimic the effect of the chared outer layer of wood.</blockquote>

    An interesting thought.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJan 5th 2018
     
    If it supports a floor then it needs fire resistance.
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