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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

Buy individually or both books together. Delivery is free!


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    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeJan 11th 2018
     
    What is avoidable plastic?
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeJan 11th 2018 edited
     
    It wouldn't matter if (nearly) all was captured and upcycled into new plastics feedstock.

    Note that upcycling is a world apart from 'recycling' which merely processes energy-degraded stuff into even more energy-degraded dumb products like 'save a tree' fencing planks. The hi-energy-content feedstock that's necessary for hi-grade plastic products (incl much of packaging) at present only comes virgin from oil refineries.

    The only fundamental difference between upcycling and dumb 'recycling' is that there's presently no energy input to refine and chemically upgrade the mixed lo-grade rubbish into pure engineering-grade feedstock. Call it locally reversal of entropy - and of course that always mean increased entropy somewhere else.

    Where would that (considerable) energy input come from? Obviously not from any fossil source, otherwise the 'somewhere else' of increased entropy would happen right here in the biosphere.

    It would have to (and increasingly feasibly can) come from insolation and/or its downstream derivatives wind, tide etc. That way the 'somewhere else' of increased entropy would happen out there, elsewhere in the cosmos, which is the way that Life has operated always, until disrupted by fossil burning. Indeed that 'exported entropy' effect is one of the best indicators of Life, and is what James Lovelock, as NASA scientist, was working on which led to his development of the Gaia hypothesis.

    So - no more petrochemical plastic until we can get going on solar-powered upcycling. Until then, no more burning of hydrocarbon waste for municipal energy - it's a precious resource, future feedstock, which should be stockpiled now aka landfill.
    • CommentAuthormaxelaine
    • CommentTimeJan 12th 2018
     
    What he said
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeJan 13th 2018
     
    Welcome back Tom, you been away again?
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeJan 13th 2018
     
    Kent not Cornwall, that's the trouble.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeJan 13th 2018
     
    Funny place Kent.
    Probably been dryer, but colder.
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeJan 13th 2018 edited
     
    Isle of Sheppey - wild deserted bird marshes, abandoned industry, vast sky and seascape despite being estuarial. Long beaches sand shell mud, decayed resorts - not 50mi from central London - incredible. Distant shipping dwarfed by forests of huge turbines. Naturally, Boris would put an airport on it.
    https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2017/dec/21/walking-north-kent-marshes-hoo-peninsula-charles-dickens
    • CommentAuthorgoodevans
    • CommentTimeJan 13th 2018 edited
     
    I moved from Sussex to the edge of the Fens. At first I struggled at the lack of trees and hills and thought I would soon have to be moving on. I have found however that the big sky is a little addictive and it seems that this is my place now. Strange how things turn out.
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