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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
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    • CommentAuthordelprado
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2018
     
    Just getting to first fix and thinking do I need ethernet, etc? Anyone found any good guides/resources or can offer any help?

    Thanks
    • CommentAuthorDarylP
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2018
     
    Cat5e all the way, every room, back to a central switch. :wink:
    • CommentAuthorTimSmall
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2018
     
    You might also just wish to divide it into wifi zones (particularly if you have wifi proof structure), with cat5e the locations where you would put wifi access points. A lot less wiring. With my house shape and structure, I can get away with just one access point.

    You could also put in extra cat5e to rooms where you think you might need extra bandwidth.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2018
     
    Radials, cat5 + to everywhere you might need it.
    • CommentAuthordelprado
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2018
     
    WHy not Cat 6 or 7. Less interference, higher speed?

    I am actually think about POF. Any thoughts pm that?

    Darlyp, did you really feel like you needed it in every room, why?

    Tim, I like the idea of that - so a bit of a halfway house. I was thinking at a minimum hard wired cable to study and TV room, and kitchen (as all sorts will happen there in the future I guess), and maybe one point somewhere upstairs, each of which shall have its own sort of wifi node?
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2018
     
    It all depends on your preferences. I went for Cat 5 everywhere, as per Daryl's suggestion. I don't like to rely on wi-fi.
    Not Cat 6 because it's a pain to install (maintaining the bend radius etc) and I don't think I'll need the performance.
    You'll want sockets wherever you might want a TV these days.

    Also don't forget to wire TV/radio cables.

    Electrical sockets on every piece of wall and multiples on long sections of wall. Sockets every few inches in the kitchen.

    Posted By: delpradoI am actually think about POF.

    The Leading Free Online Dating Site for Singles ...?
    • CommentAuthordelprado
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2018
     
    PS I dont quite understand LV wiring
    • CommentAuthordelprado
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2018
     
    Sockets just seem to outdated dont they - disgusting to look at and a faff to install
    • CommentAuthorSprocket
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2018
     
    Yup. What they all said.
    Cat 5 (or a better variant like Cat 5E or Cat6 if you want) from a central point to every room.
    That central point would ideally be a server cupboard or at least a small 19" rack where all the cables terminate in a patch panel. In each room the cable will terminate in an RJ45 socket on the wall somewhere.

    I tend to put two to most locations if possible. That lets me put phone down one and data over the other easily.
    In large/long/key rooms you might want to think about putting the two at different locations (think where you might put a TV).
    • CommentAuthorrevor
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2018
     
    I have put car 5e in every room and coax in most. If you want a good resource for how to plan it all out look at a company called Cable Monkey. They have some very good guides on home networking. Have a look here.

    https://www.cablemonkey.co.uk/content/20-technical-information
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2018
     
    Posted By: revorIf you want a good resource for how to plan it all out

    Thanks for that link. The Connectix Design Guide looks very useful :bigsmile:

    ... and mentions several things we haven't thought of so far in this thread!
    • CommentAuthorMackers
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2018
     
    I would use Cat6A as they are roughly the same size now as Cat6 and with the new CPR regs, it makes more sense.

    Cat6A everywhere and two to any WiFi point.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2018
     
    Posted By: MackersI would use Cat6A as they are roughly the same size now as Cat6 and with the new CPR regs, it makes more sense.

    Could you explain a bit about what that implies and why it matters? Especially as regards to the choice of the three cabling classes being discussed?
    • CommentAuthordelprado
    • CommentTimeFeb 26th 2018
     
    Here is info about POF, by the way, I am still highly tempted. I bought their starter pack last year and have some of the (cool) cable on site.

    https://www.homefibre.at/en/the-system/for-end-user/
    • CommentAuthorsam_cat
    • CommentTimeFeb 26th 2018
     
    If your getting ready for first fix, consider tubing/trunking in wall and some loops of string for pulling cables.. Then if a cable goes bad or you want to update to some newer spec/pull extras then you can easily.

    Run everything to the loft, patch panel in the loft, then (using the trunking) you can move the 'comms cupboard' in the future if you need.

    I use full width wall plates which take upto 4 'modules', typically each room has 2 gigabit ethernet ports and 2 blanked off. This makes it extra easy if you wanted to drop an FM aerial, or a satellite cable or whatever into any room as well.
    And you can always add a second full width wall plate above/below the existing one if you need more than 4.

    Its a bit of extra work and a bit of extra cost, but then you have the luxury of changing your mind later and it not being a massive PITA (just a small PITA)

    :)
  1.  
    So experience from wiring and living with two houses:
    - pretty pointless going to every room. Not least the point has to be in exactly the *right place* in a room to be any use. Do you want an internet bedside radio or an internet connected TV on the wall opposite the bed or a computer at where you place a child's desk? To actually be useful you'd need network to practically every power point.

    My advice (and experience of what we've actually used after install):
    You want to put the modem right next to the point where the phone line comes in. Sticking the modem in your 'central cupboard' at the end of an extension (even if its over CATx twisted pair) can halve the speed. Then run CAT cable from a central point with your switch to the modem, and then cable to places where you know you'ore going to have fixed items.
    - TV points in rooms where you know you'll install a TV (likely 4+ outlets in the living room for TV, Satellite box, Game console ++)
    - to the desk at any permanent 'office' space
    - then to a couple of points where you're going to put wifi points to get best coverage. Depending on the house layout it's probably high up and pretty central and you might only need 1. Add steel/concrete to the structure and you could need one per floor more.

    For all other devices/uses Wifi is easy and will continue to get better and faster.

    Get a Wifi point that can use 'power over ethernet' (Cisco, Ubiquiti) which will keep it neat wherever you put the WAP

    Questionable whether it's worth putting TV points everywhere now. I did and I've only used the point in the Living room. Sky's new boxes only have one connected to the satellite feed and the rest are linked using Wifi. I've heard Sky are on the verge of making their entire offering available over the internet (ie so you won't need a dish).

    BBC/ITV/C4 catch up services all let you watch live tv over internet.
  2.  
    In my new build we ran four cables to a plate in every room (some rooms have more than one plate). I got slightly confused by the electrician, but I understand the cables were:
    1 x Cat 6
    3 x cable that can carry the satellite, phone, TV aerial, DAB depending on what I want on the other end (should be configurable).

    I'm tending towards Simon's view that we completely over did it as most cables are never used and it ended up costing a lot more than I expected. If we build again I think we'll do much less cabling.

    The costs might be negated if you are doing the first fix yourself.
    • CommentAuthordelprado
    • CommentTimeFeb 26th 2018
     
    My take is that I understand the point of data cabling to be able to stream between rooms effectively, but anything to do with satellite, TV or phone, these are 20th century technologies and surely we dont need that anymore!
    • CommentAuthorgyrogear
    • CommentTimeFeb 26th 2018 edited
     
    My take is that the title of this thread is "what type of wiring" and for me this implies wires = conductors = electricity, rather than data cabling...

    Yet nobody seems to be addressing this aspect !

    I clicked on this thread precisely for this aspect - to see what was being said about shielded copper conductors, since given the "tendency" towards so-called smart meters, using power line communication, this aspect requires looking at IMO...

    My wiring (and consumer unit...) are 30-odd years old, and the power co are trying to shove a "smart" meter at me... I have padlocked the meter box up...

    gg
  3.  
    Posted By: delpradoMy take is that I understand the point of data cabling to be able to stream between rooms effectively, but anything to do with satellite, TV or phone, these are 20th century technologies and surely we dont need that anymore!


    Phone - I agree, pretty unnecessary, except perhaps in the office.

    TV / Satellite - unless you are prepared to watch purely Netflix and Amazon Prime I don't think they are redundant yet (although moving that way). Can you rule out never wanting a Sky? We have BT TV and some channels come down the aerial and others via broadband, so we couldn't be without the cables. I think in a few years the conversation could be different, but we aren't there yet.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeFeb 26th 2018
     
    Posted By: delpradoMy take is that I understand the point of data cabling to be able to stream between rooms effectively, but anything to do with satellite, TV or phone, these are 20th century technologies and surely we dont need that anymore!

    As I said, it entirely depends on your philosophy. I don't have satellite, because I've never felt the need. I do have FreeView and FM radio and DAB and they are all cabled via a distribution amplifier. We record almost all TV before watching it. My recorder (Youview box) wants to dial home, but I keep it disconnected from the Internet to stop it doing so. Phone base station is close to the master socket, as is the ADSL modem/router. I have two network switches, one at each end of the building, to minimise cable lengths. I minimise the use of Wi-Fi, mainly it's used by the wife's iPhone for video calls. Phone handsets are DECT.

    Thanks for the info on the fibre system. Looks nice but expensive. Personally, I'm not worried about EM radiation from data cables and I'm happy with my pedestrian Cat5e performance so it seems like overkill to me. But each to his own.

    Putting conduits in is probably good advice. Is it the French who require conduits and single wires in them for mains?
  4.  
    >>Phone - I agree, pretty unnecessary, except perhaps in the office.

    We've not used our landline since we moved. Both our mobile contracts have more inclusive minutes than we will ever use and 'wifi calling' (an iPhone on EE though I think this is commonly available now) solves any issues of poor reception. Using a DECT phone recently I realised how poor the call quality was.

    I made a couple of brief calls when we first had the landline and was shocked at the per minute cost. Inclusive calls would add c£8 a month. For International calls we use Skype (with some paid credit) to call overseas numbers.

    Re - Cable standards. CAT6 is as cheap as CAT5 now. I didn't find it a lot harder to install.

    Personally I'd still install the satellite dish (for Freesat if not Sky) and a DAB ariel. I'd forgotten that my DTT/Satellite and DAB are all multiplexed over a single Co-Ax cable. While I only use the Sat outlet in one place we use the DAB in nearly every room! So that definitely *was* worth installing.
    • CommentAuthordelprado
    • CommentTimeFeb 26th 2018
     
    I think one of the best benefits of pof is for retrofitting when you dont want disruption- its so thin it could travel around the edge of a room and you wouldnt even know it was there.

    I wanted something future proofed if we ever get FTTH rather than FTTC which is what we all rely on

    (on the other point) - as Dave says its all personal but for me I refuse to have any of this live stuff, because of the stupid boxes and paraphernalia.
  5.  
    >>"I refuse to have any of this live stuff, because of the stupid boxes and paraphernalia." ??
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeFeb 26th 2018
     
    Most international calls now are free via Facetime or WhatsApp, and most social UK calls for that matter. We use a calling service on the landline so very rarely pay the provider's call charges. We use PAYG mobiles
    • CommentAuthordelprado
    • CommentTimeFeb 26th 2018
     
    Simon, im referring to skyboxes, you view boxes and any of those other tyrannies of modernity.
  6.  
    WIFI pretty much does it all now , but cat5 etc if you like wires

    LV you want radials on RCBOs giving you plenty of descrimination in circuits

    I'd have one specifically for the freezer/fridge and for your IT supply DSL/fibre

    4 sockets each bedroom , 8 living room , steer clear of down lights in upfloors or into VP/airtightness layer

    Fit a kill switch next to your bed
    • CommentAuthortorrent99
    • CommentTimeFeb 26th 2018
     
    Cat 5/5e/6 to every room. WiFi just does not deliver the speed or reliability that wired does even if you are close to the hub.

    Try copying a file from one PC to another via WiFi, then try it via wired....

    Plus Cat 5 can be used for delivery of other services e.g. landline, low quality speaker cable, temp sensors etc. POF (fibre) looks interesting, but not sure many home devices are likely to support it.
  7.  
    >WiFi just does not deliver the speed or reliability that wired does even if you are close to the hub. Try copying a file from one PC to another via WiFi, then try it via wired..

    Agreed, but how often does it matter in reality?

    Most computers sold are laptops, and sales are falling (as most 'computing' is now done on phone or tablet). The latest Apple laptops don't even have a network port (without a dongle)

    Wifi is quick enough to stream music, HD movies, browse the web.
    • CommentAuthorgravelld
    • CommentTimeFeb 26th 2018
     
    Posted By: Simon StillWifi is quick enough to stream music, HD movies, browse the web.
    Networking isn't only measured in terms of "quick".
   
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