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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

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    • CommentAuthorRex
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2018
     
    What ho one and all,

    I have a timber framed house with Fermacell as the intentional dry lining. All boards are edge joined with Joint Stick, then Fine Surface Filler and painted.

    Over the years, some hairline cracks have appeared, generally above doors and some windows. There are some larger cracks in the wall / plasterboard ceiling corner and a couple on some internal corners. Structurally, they are fine, as I believe they are all settlement cracks but I would like to fill them.

    The easiest way is just plain decorators filler (or something similar) but do wonder whether a paper tape would provide a bit more permanence and reinforcement? Your thoughts would be most welcome.

    Since most tape is applied at the building stage where making a mess is not an issue, I'm uncertain the best way to proceed with tape, if that is the way to go. Paste it like wallpaper and apply? Paint some PVA around the crack and apply the paper?

    Again, your thoughts will be most welcome.

    Toodle pip and thanks

    Rex

    T
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2018
     
    For all internal corners I would use acrylic decorators filler, painters mate etc
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2018 edited
     
    Second what Tony said. Use a flexible filler of some kind. Personally I'll probably use AC50 when i get around to our cracks in a few years, since I grew to love the stuff during the build.
    • CommentAuthordelprado
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2018
     
    Toupret do a filler with fibres in it (called fibrecyl or something), or you can look at some of the lime repair stuff by Beeck, like their quartz filler
  1.  
    I've got the same issue to address in the next couple of months.

    AC50? Is that EverBuild AC50? What's it like to paint over?
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2018
     
    Posted By: delpradoToupret do a filler with fibres in it (called fibrecyl or something), or you can look at some of the lime repair stuff by Beeck, like their quartz filler

    I'd be nervous about fibres in a finishing layer, because they can stick out. If they're polypropylene, its possible to burn them off though. The Beeck stuff is for hairline cracks; it's not a filler in the normal sense. It's more like a thickish paint.

    Posted By: Simon StillAC50? Is that EverBuild AC50? What's it like to paint over?

    Yes. It's fine to paint. I'm sure the normal caulks are fine as well.
    • CommentAuthorArtiglio
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2018
     
    Keim do a mineral based breathable fibre reinforced filler, Spachtal, comes premixed, not cheap. I’ve only used it externally but found it to be excellent for small areas, for bigger repairs they do a dry premix called universal render fein. Easy to apply and work and can be sanded to form corners , mouldings etc.
    You can order direct from Keim in telford or through many trade decorating suppliers.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2018
     
    For cracks in flat walls either paper tape or clever bits of lining paper work well.
    • CommentAuthorRex
    • CommentTimeMar 13th 2018 edited
     
    Gentlemen,

    Thanks for the replies.

    The AC50 looks interesting but with that or any of the other decorators filler, I am concerned about getting it into the hairline cracks. the larger cracks, not so much of an issue, but I really don't want to enlarge the hairline even though I know a larger crack is the best way to fill.

    Some of the hairline cracks are virtually straight so gouging deeper is possible, but a few are a bit wiggly, so reluctant to scrape and gouge.

    I have some paper folded paper tape which would be good for the larger ceiling cracks. What is the best way to adhere it? Wet with wall paper paste and stick in place?

    Thanks

    Rex
    • CommentAuthorRex
    • CommentTimeMar 13th 2018
     
    should have asked, what about the self adhesive drywall mesh tape to cover the crack? Does it actually add reinforcement?
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 13th 2018
     
    Posted By: RexI am concerned about getting it into the hairline cracks. the larger cracks, not so much of an issue, but I really don't want to enlarge the hairline

    For that, the Beeck quartz filler would be suited.
  2.  
    Posted By: Rexshould have asked, what about the self adhesive drywall mesh tape to cover the crack? Does it actually add reinforcement?

    Yes
    it is what I use for all plasterboard work, between boards and for internal corners. I use aluminum corners for external corners. I've not had problems of subsequent cracking.

    Over here we don't skim PB, just tape and fill joints

    I have also used the tape on a block and beam ceiling where come cracks appeared in the rendering over the block and beam. 3 years on and there has been on reappearance of the cracks
    • CommentAuthorRex
    • CommentTimeMar 18th 2018
     
    Gentlemen,

    Again, thanks for the comments. I used Fermacell for the walls and only a thin coat of the Fine Surface Treatment. Ceilings are PB with taped joints.

    Did a test with tape and PVA. Certainly sticks well, but the working time is short. May be tape and wall paper paste for a longer working time.
  3.  
    Posted By: RexDid a test with tape and PVA. Certainly sticks well, but the working time is short. May be tape and wall paper paste for a longer working time.

    I have always used the self adhesive drywall mesh tape without any extra sticky and found it OK
    • CommentAuthorrevor
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2018
     
    According to the British Gypsum white book paper tape is stronger than mesh tape and is preferable in dry-lining and is what I have used soaking the paper before applying it to adhesive on the joint.

    I have just had plasterers in skimming boards wall and ceiling that I installed. For the mesh scrim tape they sprayed some contact spray adhesive intermittently across the joint to help the tape stick they found that this helped the tape stay in on place because often the adhesive on the tape is not sufficient. For the thin coat corner beads they bonded these on the corners with the same spray adhesive much quicker that using a bit of plaster and waiting for it to go off a bit. Learn something every day.

    When plaster boarding around windows or doors to avoid opening up of the joint it is preferable to not have the joint running up as a continuum of the door frame but cut it out as an L piece. Depending on the size involved I will often fix a whole sheet of plasterboard over the opening and cut the board to the frame. Failure to do this usually results in cracking at the joint.
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