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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

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    • CommentAuthoradam_w
    • CommentTimeApr 3rd 2018 edited
     
    Good morning all, I hope you had enjoyable and productive Easter weekends!

    I'm looking for some advice regarding lintels, I need one to span a garage door opening 2.75m wide as part of a 2 storey extension 3.6m wide. The ground floor will be 140mm single skin and above it will be timber frame with a gable end and the whole thing externally insulated using EPS.

    My original plan was to use a pre stressed concrete lintel as I thought the consistency of material at that level would be preferential however its my understanding that a steel version would be much stronger. The garage door is to be mounted inside the blockwork opening, as far forward as possible to reduce thermal bridging so I'm hoping that wont be a factor for the lintel either.

    As always, your thoughts, opinions and experiences would be greatly appreciated!

    Adam
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeApr 3rd 2018
     
    Standard heavy duty steel lintel can be looked up in tables but I would use an RSJ
    • CommentAuthoradam_w
    • CommentTimeApr 3rd 2018
     
    Tony, I was hoping to avoid an RSJ due to the complications of attaching the EPS to it hence my preference for the concrete version, do you not think this would be suitable?

    Thanks,

    Adam
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeApr 3rd 2018
     
    No, we always wanted to see at least three courses of bricks built on top of pcl and the done cope with point loads either.
    • CommentAuthoradam_w
    • CommentTimeApr 3rd 2018
     
    Fair do's tony, what about a steel box section so I at least have a flat face to bond my EWI on to?

    Thanks,

    Adam
    • CommentAuthoradam_w
    • CommentTimeApr 3rd 2018
     
    For situational clarification, the lintel in question is coloured in blue;
      lintel.jpg
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeApr 3rd 2018
     
    Probably a heavy duty standard builders box little would do, it might be possible to use a wooden lintel
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeApr 3rd 2018
     
    Posted By: tonyProbably a heavy duty standard builders box little would do, it might be possible to use a wooden lintel


    Glulam?
  1.  
    If you use an RSJ it is possible to fix a timber plank inside the web (with spacers if needed to get a flush surface) by drilling into the centre of the web. I have found that standard EWI adhesive sticks well to wood.

    It could come down to what is easily available in your area.
    • CommentAuthoradam_w
    • CommentTimeApr 4th 2018
     
    Thank you all for your input. I've since been in touch with a company called 'Stressline' who for my scenario have recommended their SL140HD box 3150mm long, it looks ideal. I was thinking about spraying in an expanding foam within the box to make it more air tight, any reason why this may not be a good idea?

    Thanks again,

    Adam
      sl140hd.jpg
    • CommentAuthoradam_w
    • CommentTimeApr 4th 2018
     
    Properties;
      sl140hd_2.jpg
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeApr 4th 2018
     
    Non expanding would be a safer choice
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