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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

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  1.  
    Some years ago we laid a click-lock laminate floor 'floating' - not glued to the subfloor. As instructed we left a small expansion gap all round the edges, which was covered by skirting.

    Over time, some of the planks have shuffled themselves along, so they are driven hard against the wall at one end. The gap at the other end has widened, so that the end of the laminate has popped out from under the skirting, which looks a mess.

    We could rip off all the skirting, unlock the floor and re-lay it in position, possibly glued down this time. But can anyone think of an easier way to shuffle it back into position?

    What would you use to glue it down while still allowing expansion? The subfloor is chipboard over electric ufh.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeApr 5th 2018
     
    Jump on it with gym shoes morning in the direction of the big gap knees bent both feet together

    Hate this but fit a trim to cover the gap

    Remove the other skirting and use a shovel as a wide lever with a sheet of 10mm ply to protect the wall
  2.  
    Hate this but fit a trim to cover the gap

    +1
    • CommentAuthorgyrogear
    • CommentTimeApr 6th 2018
     
    Posted By: WillInAberdeenBut can anyone think of an easier way to shuffle it back into position


    I wood try jacking it back over some, by inserting two floor bars
    https://extremehowto.com/handy-flooring-tools/
    into the tight side (might require some persuasion) then putting a batten across them, then using a car jack or two (or wedges), acting on a second (vertical) batten stood against the skirting, to force the floor back over a bit.

    Wood then insert soft shims (blocks of EPS) at regular intervals to stop it happening again.

    gg
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeApr 6th 2018
     
    I have the same problem with the bathroom carpet-mat - over 24hrs it walks to the other end of the room.
  3.  
    Posted By: gyrogearPosted By: WillInAberdeenBut can anyone think of an easier way to shuffle it back into position

    Why shuffle it back with the attendant risk of damage? Expansion is still available at one end or the other.

    Of course you don't know how many other such floors are also affected, just that the gap left on installation was not big enough to show from under the edge beading after some movement.
  4.  
    >> then insert soft shims (blocks of EPS) at regular intervals to stop it happening again.

    I think I foresaw this on our floors. We shimmed with cut up bits of cork tile
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeApr 6th 2018
     
    Posted By: Peter_in_HungaryWhy shuffle it back with the attendant risk of damage?
    Posted By: WillInAberdeenthe end of the laminate has popped out from under the skirting, which looks a mess.
  5.  
    Posted By: djh
    Posted By: Peter_in_HungaryWhy shuffle it back with the attendant risk of damage?
    Posted By: WillInAberdeenthe end of the laminate has popped out from under the skirting, which looks a mess.

    Hence the suggestion to fit a (wider) trim to cover the gap
  6.  
    Thanks all. The planks cannot be slid back into place without unlocking them from their neighbours.

    As temporary bodge I have filled the gaps with coloured acrylic caulk while we decide what to do next.

    I will never lay another 'floating' floor
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2018
     
    Posted By: WillInAberdeenI will never lay another 'floating' floor

    I think the important thing is to follow the instructions and put padding in the gaps; don't leave them empty.
  7.  
    Posted By: WillInAberdeenAs temporary bodge I have filled the gaps with coloured acrylic caulk while we decide what to do next.

    In your position I would be fitting a decorative molding at the base of the skirting board to cover the gaps and finish the same as the skirting board. Oh and I wouldn't bother with the caulking.

    The only other option I see is to take it up and relay - but this will involve an amount of unavoidable damage to the floor sections which you may not be able to replace without seeing a difference.
    • CommentAuthorCX23882
    • CommentTimeApr 20th 2018
     
    How about some suction cups, like what you can use to lift sheets of glass? Probably depends on how smooth the surface of the laminate is, and how easily the laminate slides against the subfloor versus the amount of suction and friction between the cups and the laminate. Might be worth a try.

    I have a similar problem with click-lock vinyl planks (3mm thick). During the heating season, I frequently see the floor in the hallway pull itself apart - I think because of the central heating pipes running along one edge of the concrete floor, and due to that, entire rows of planks expand more than their neighbours. The gaps aren't huge, but they're noticeable.

    I still haven't attached the cover trim for this exact reason - once it's on, I can't knock the planks back into position using the little pull-bar tool. Tempted to just glue the joints but it's a bit final doing that, and if it doesn't work, I'm stuck.
    • CommentAuthorgyrogear
    • CommentTimeApr 20th 2018 edited
     
    Posted By: CX23882floor in the hallway pull itself apart - I think because of the central heating pipes running along one edge of the concrete floor


    Any way you could add some humidity in the area, such as with a planter or a terra cotta humidifier to hang on the radiator etc.

    otherwise...

    https://www.highya.com/aqua-stone-reviews

    (or even an animal fountain)

    https://www.amazon.com/Animal-Planet-Automated-Feeding-Fountain/dp/B009QGQHYC

    gg
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