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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

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    • CommentAuthorgravelld
    • CommentTime5 days ago edited
     
    See the PHI's recommendation for fitting replacement windows: https://europhit.eu/products-focus#Window%20Installation%20Connections

    They say that their findings were that the best place for a replacement window, which will be EWI'd later, is flush with the external face of the wall (https://europhit.eu/sites/europhit.eu/files/Design%20briefs/EuroPHit_D5.1.1a_WindowConnection_WindowFirst_PHI.pdf 2.2 Proposed Solution)

    Is such a solution acceptable to UK building regs, is it not expected that the window is recessed a little?
    • CommentAuthorDarylP
    • CommentTime5 days ago
     
    where in B Regs does it spec window inset....?
    After EWI, the window will be 'recessed' ?:confused:
    • CommentAuthorgyrogear
    • CommentTime5 days ago
     
    Posted By: DarylPAfter EWI, the window will be 'recessed'


    ... and the room will presumably receive less daylight !

    gg
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTime5 days ago
     
    Posted By: gravelldSee the PI's recommendation

    What is 'the PI'? Do you mean the PHI?

    As Daryl hints, there's nothing in building regs about that. If you search, I'm sure you'll find several houses that make a feature of having their windows outside the wall.

    Posted By: gyrogearthe room will presumably receive less daylight !

    Why?
    • CommentAuthorgyrogear
    • CommentTime5 days ago
     
    Because of the shadow cast by the reveal...

    gg
    • CommentAuthorgravelld
    • CommentTime5 days ago
     
    Posted By: DarylPwhere in B Regs does it spec window inset....?

    It might not do - but I keep reading it does without any actual citations!

    Posted By: DarylPAfter EWI, the window will be 'recessed' ?
    Yes... a decade (say) later...
    • CommentAuthorgravelld
    • CommentTime5 days ago
     
    Posted By: gyrogear... and the room will presumably receive less daylight !
    Yes, this is one of the reasons for not placing the window in the current position which would be further recessed, plus it minimises shading (although of course shading might be quite helpful to avoid over heating in some cases!)
    • CommentAuthorgravelld
    • CommentTime5 days ago
     
    Posted By: djh
    Posted By: gravelldSee the PI's recommendation

    What is 'the PI'? Do you mean the PHI?

    As Daryl hints, there's nothing in building regs about that. If you search, I'm sure you'll find several houses that make a feature of having their windows outside the wall.

    Oh, thought "P" was one word so didn't include the H, but you're right.

    And thinking about the BR issue - yes, you and Daryl must be correct, because as detailed in the very resource I linked to some people do attempt installations that sit outside the walls!
    • CommentAuthorgravelld
    • CommentTime5 days ago
     
    My other thoughts are, to what extent is it possible to install the window to make it easier to move later?

    I noticed some winners of the award that the PHI invented had exactly this capability, so I don't quite understand why the PHI's recommendation was to install flush - maybe for the "general" case with no manufacturer support?
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTime5 days ago
     
    Posted By: gyrogearBecause of the shadow cast by the reveal...

    The existing window is already shaded by a reveal. The new window can be bigger, so the glazed area occupies the area previously occupied by the frame, and you have complete control over the shape of the new reveal that you build when you install the insulation, so I'm not sure why there should be less daylight?
    • CommentAuthorgravelld
    • CommentTime5 days ago
     
    @djh What you say is true but...

    - Having an embrasure (I think that is what its called) doesn't necessarily fit into the aesthetic.
    - The glazed area may or may not cover a larger area that the old window. Some new windows have *larger* frames than old softwood for example
    - Even allowing for that, it feels like with a good, say, 200-300mm of EWI that's quite a depth to cope with
    - You could cut a larger window but that obviously adds to costs, and it might not fit into the aesthetic (or wider design/use)

    What I'm saying is that it adds constraints, which may or may not be acceptable (I hate it when I rationalise away my point!)
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