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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

PLEASE NOTE: A download link for Volume 1 will be sent to you by email and Volume 2 will be sent to you by post as a book.

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    • CommentAuthorJamster
    • CommentTimeJul 9th 2018
     
    Hi all,

    After years of procrastinating, I'm attempting a year-round garden room project.

    It'll be clad in waney-edge timber, likely larch and partially inspired by marsaday's build here: http://www.greenbuildingforum.co.uk/newforum/comments.php?DiscussionID=15456&page=2

    My only query at the moment is do I need a breather membrane (I think I do) and also a vapour barrier, and where does it / they sit? My wall build up from inside to out is:
    OSB skin or more likely t&g;
    Structural studwork and rockwool insulation;
    12mm OSB;
    breather membrane??
    vertical battens;
    horizonal w/e cladding.

    This is my initial plan; do I need a vapour barrier on the warm side of the insulation as well? Building won't be heated, I'm insulating to make it more comfortable and draft-proof in the winter but its not intended to be habitable.

    Thoughts please everyone? Jamie
    • CommentAuthormarsaday
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2018
     
    The breathing membrane sits on the outside of the build and is there is stop rain as a secondary barrier. The timber finish is usually the first barrier. This membrane wants to be breathable so it lets vapour pass outwards.

    Vapour barriers sit inside the build and are designed to stop warm air getting into the colder air spaces.

    So this would sit behind your OSB skin internally.
    • CommentAuthorJamster
    • CommentTime7 days ago
     
    Posted By: marsadayThe breathing membrane sits on the outside of the build and is there is stop rain as a secondary barrier. The timber finish is usually the first barrier. This membrane wants to be breathable so it lets vapour pass outwards.

    Vapour barriers sit inside the build and are designed to stop warm air getting into the colder air spaces.

    So this would sit behind your OSB skin internally.


    Thanks - did you put both on yours? Thinking about it a bit more, an internal VCL is likely to be relatively cheap and the breather membrane more essential so I may well go with both.

    How is your build now?
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTime5 days ago edited
     
    Sounds similar to my out building. I used...

    12mm WBP
    Vapour barrier
    Structural studwork and rockwool insulation;
    12mm WBP
    Breathable Roofing Membrane (VP400)
    Vertical battens
    Horizonal Oak boards

    OSB would be cheaper but I had some WBP already and wanted a better internal finish (I just painted the inner WBP white).

    It's on a concrete slab with two courses of engineering bricks and a DPC to raise the frame off the ground. The vertical battens extend down to about 1" off the slab so I had something to fix the lowest oak board to. I think on a habitable building I might have used more courses and plinth bricks.

    The oak boards had bits of plastic DPM installed behind each butt joint to divert any rain to the outside.
    • CommentAuthorJamster
    • CommentTime3 days ago
     
    Thanks CWatters - sounds very similar. I've used gabion baskets as a perimeter strip foundation and have some recycled 8" x 4" sleeper-sized lengths that I will fix on to the baskets and to each other for use as a sole plate and to hang flooring joists off.
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