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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

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    • CommentAuthorgoodevans
    • CommentTimeNov 1st 2018
     
    Hi all, I am currently half way through the build - single skin block wall up, and roof on. At the moment the EWI is planned to go on early spring next year when the weather improves. In the meantime the builders can work inside however...

    I noticed today that the inside surface of the block work is damp, it could be seepage from outside rain or condensation from the atmosphere (the outside walls being colder) - I'm unsure. Under these circumstances would It be rash to wet plaster the internal walls after the windows have been installed - or would the dampness cause the plaster/plasterer problems?
  1.  
    In my view, with gypsum, quite possibly. With lime, probably not. The Baumit products are lovely (and no, I don't work for them nor speak in any role except as a (non-plasterer) satisfied customer who is currently sat looking at a wall which got a compliment from my ('pink'-trained) plasterer mate - and he does not do compliments!!
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeNov 1st 2018
     
    Do you have any heating and/or ventilation in the house? Without both, the house will be damp, perhaps to the point of growing mould. Note that plastering will make the atmosphere inside the house considerably wetter and will require more heat and lots of ventilation.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeNov 1st 2018
     
    Yes so long as you heat a bit say 16C you should be OK, having said that I would do th EWI first and can’t see a reason not to get on with it now.
    • CommentAuthorgoodevans
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2018
     
    There will be no heating for a while yet - services at least 3 months away.

    Ventilation is very good at the moment as there are no doors and windows!

    I was going to EWI once the windows were in - this will hopefully be around Christmas.

    Once the windows are in I think we can keep out the moisture/rain - and open the doors and windows on dry days and have the walls about as dry and warm as a garage perhaps.

    But I fear between the builder and me we may have got ourselves stuck. I had assumes a watertight but unheated building could be plaseterd - but the single skin may change the normal run of things.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2018
     
    Posted By: goodevansservices at least 3 months away.

    Ouch! What have you been doing for electricity and water?

    I was going to EWI once the windows were in - this will hopefully be around Christmas.

    Perhaps you could do the bulk of the EWI before the windows arrive and then tidy up around them once they are installed?
    • CommentAuthorgoodevans
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2018
     
    We have good neighbours and they have been able to provide water. Most power tools are battery based and the builders come fully prepped with charged batteries each day. As well as having a generator on site for the heavy duty stuff.

    I can't book the water connection until the water board have inspected the pipework to the house. The road needs closing so it is always 3 months away. I will get all the services done at the same time.

    And in the builders mind 3 months away doesn't fix any immediate problems so they work around it. But I think it is now moving up their priority list at last.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2018
     
    Posted By: goodevansI will get all the services done at the same time.

    Ha! Good luck with that. Have you told them yet? How on earth do you hope to coordinate different utilities each with their own agendas?
    • CommentAuthorgoodevans
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2018
     
    I'll arrange a road closure through a traffic management company myself with the road closed for 2 weeks. And give each utility a couple of days each to get their job done (they will not work at the same time) - It might work. Water, Electic, and telecoms and a day to make 1m of grass verge into a driveway access. In any case each of the utilities are charging the same amount as the traffic management company to close the road so I only need to get one service to install in the two week period to break even.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2018 edited
     
    It must be a small road if you can close it for two weeks? I'd expect the local authority to prefer multiple closures of a day or two rather than an extended period.

    I don't think we closed the road at all, even though the electricity supply was over the far side of the road. They dug up half, then filled that and dug up the other half.

    Our water meter is by the roadside, as far as I remember that is now standard practice. So the pipework from there to the house is yours, not theirs and its conformance is down to the plumber you have employed as is the plumbing in the house, assuming the plumber is on the water authority's approved list.

    We were lucky with telecoms because there's an underground chamber just next to our driveway, so we were able to lay the supplied cable straight into that without touching the highway.

    You don't need a road closure to make an access, because all the work can be done from your land, unless there's something peculiar.

    Our sequence was a bit different though. We got water, electricity and drains connected early to the garage, so connecting them to the house was then just a matter of extending them on our property, which is all self-certified for approved tradespeople. All trenches were dug as part of the initial groundworks.

    The access and telecoms were installed right at the end; access as part of the landscaping after all the building stuff had been cleared and telecoms once the building was almost finished inside. The cable from the telecoms underground chamber comes right into the house; we luckily predated Part-R.

    edit: clarification
  2.  
    Posted By: djhI don't think we closed the road at all, even though the electricity supply was over the far side of the road. They dug up half, then filled that and dug up the other half.

    What they do over here is to dig a hole both sides of the road and use a hydraulic mole. Much cheaper than closing roads and digging them up. (not to mention the bumpy tarmac scars that are avoided)
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeNov 3rd 2018
     
    Posted By: Peter_in_Hungary
    Posted By: djhI don't think we closed the road at all, even though the electricity supply was over the far side of the road. They dug up half, then filled that and dug up the other half.

    What they do over here is to dig a hole both sides of the road and use a hydraulic mole. Much cheaper than closing roads and digging them up. (not to mention the bumpy tarmac scars that are avoided)

    Yes, they sometimes use those here too. I forget why they couldn't do it on this occasion, perhaps too many other services they might interfere with? I seem to remember thay had to make a junction under the road as well as the one they made under the verge on the far side to actually connect the supply; don't know what that was about.
  3.  
    Posted By: djhI forget why they couldn't do it on this occasion, perhaps too many other services they might interfere with?

    Nothing interferes with other services quite like a JCB ! :devil::devil:
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeNov 3rd 2018
     
    Posted By: Peter_in_Hungary
    Posted By: djhI forget why they couldn't do it on this occasion, perhaps too many other services they might interfere with?

    Nothing interferes with other services quite like a JCB ! :devil:

    Indeed. I don't recall any of the utility companies using a digger at all. Jackhammer and shovels, yes.
    • CommentAuthorgoodevans
    • CommentTimeNov 5th 2018
     
    Yes it is a small road about 5m wide - narrow enough that the utilities can't/won't use traffic lights. All the services are in the footpath on the far side of the road. It won't inconvenience the village much as there are many routes around the village (road layout like a 4 rung ladder on plan). Only the school bus will have to take a slightly different route.
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