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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

PLEASE NOTE: A download link for Volume 1 will be sent to you by email and Volume 2 will be sent to you by post as a book.

Buy individually or both books together. Delivery is free!


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    • CommentAuthorPord
    • CommentTimeDec 27th 2018
     
    We're going to install a length of single lane track (15m initially, more later). The plan is to dig a shallow trench approx 3m wide and 200-300mm, fill initially with rubble and top with type 1. We're in Scotland, so it's wet. The soil is heavy clay, quite soft in some parts. Our other tracks don't have geotextile, but is it worth using for future?
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeDec 27th 2018
     
    There's no right answer. http://www.pavingexpert.com/pavguide.htm

    Make sure your rubble is broken, well-rolled and any voids are filled before putting down your type 1.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeDec 27th 2018
     
    I would say yes, all sounds a bit shallow to me though
  1.  
    Lots depends on your:
    Soil and subsoil
    Drainage and rainfall
    Slope
    Type/weight/frequency of vehicles
    Whether the fill has to be imported or can be borrowed on site

    Suggest to talk to local plant hire drivers, or farmers to see what works locally.

    On a steep rocky site we used no geotextile but probably 4-500mm depth crumbly stone fill, which was dug out elsewhere on the site, it lasted eight years of farm traffic before it needed re dressing. If we'd had to pay to import fill, then maybe done it differently.

    Farm contractors were much cheaper than building contractors or roads contractors for this work.
    • CommentAuthorPord
    • CommentTimeDec 27th 2018
     
    Thanks guys.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2018
     
    Are we talking cars and vans or lorriescand readymix ?
    • CommentAuthorPord
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2018
     
    The occasional car, mainly. It's officially for an extended hammerhead turning area for fire engines (as part of our planning permission conditions). Definitely no readymix - it's an offgrid strawbale house we're building.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2018
     
    If you have construction traffic going over it, you'll need to make it strong enough, or be prepared to rebuild it after you've moved in. Same goes if you ever have to call a fire engine.
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