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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

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  1.  
    Not expecting much but thought I'd ask anyway. I'm looking for realistic options aside from fibre to the cabinet or to the home.

    After 2 years of being obstructive in every way possible the owner of the (private) road outside our new build is now refusing Openreach the right to replace their existing overhead line with an underground fibre duct and, in the process, from making a new connection to our property.

    This basically means that although they are digging to within about 30m of our house, we likely won't have a fixed landline any time soon. We get by with a 4G broadband router but the data is capped and signal can be patchy.

    What I'm wondering about is whether if they get their duct that close, there's some form of local transmitter that can bridge the last few metres to our property wirelessly. Maybe that wouldn't be any better than the 4G but it is going to be so frustratingly close that it feels like there ought to be a solution...
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJan 9th 2019 edited
     
    Posted By: Doubting_ThomasAfter 2 years of being obstructive in every way possible the owner of the (private) road outside our new build is now refusing Openreach the right to replace their existing overhead line with an underground fibre duct and, in the process, from making a new connection to our property.

    My first thought there would be to consult a solicitor (or ask on a legal forum?) and see whether you or Openreach have any rights that trump your road-owner's objection. At the last house we owned we had a Telewest (latterly Virgin) cabinet right at the end of our drive, but it was a shared drive and despite all four of us neighbours that shared and jointly owned the drive applying for a connection to Virgin, and their salesmen being keen to make sales to us, we never did get them to make a connection. So I was very hot chasing our solicitor when we bought our plot to make sure we had continuing rights over the shared drive* written very clearly. And we put a comms duct in to a roadside BT chamber, so we can blow whatever without digging up anything.

    What I'm wondering about is whether if they get their duct that close, there's some form of local transmitter that can bridge the last few metres to our property wirelessly.

    Technically there is of course but who is going to own and operate that transmitter on whose property? You can bet Openreach won't. There are various local broadband suppliers but they tend to rely on farmers joining and digging trenches across their fields and suchlike rather than individual householders. It's also technically possible to run a fibre overhead of course, though I have no idea whether Openreach will consider that.

    *edit: not shared ownership: the neighbour owns it, we have certain rights to use it
  2.  
    We had half a mile of fibre to the home strung overhead from poles. Openreach reused the existing poles carrying the copper line, thus avoiding any road digging issues.

    It did take them ages to get that far, and in the meantime an enthusiastic neighbour was into getting a wireless link beamed from a village 2 miles further down the road, it was going to go to a dish on his house and then he would distribute it to all the neighbours via shorter wireless links. There are apparently grants available and companies who can build and run this for you.
  3.  
    Or there's satellite broadband.

    We had certain rights in our shared access road, which another party ignored, and when eventually we enforced then the resulting neighbour dispute and full on unpleasantness lasted for several years and dragged in our (formerly mutual) friends from miles around, making it impossible for any other neighbourhood issues to be dealt with. Consider carefully before starting legal proceedings on your neighbours, however much you are legally in the right.
    • CommentAuthorBeau
    • CommentTimeJan 10th 2019
     
    We are in a rural location and fiber is out of the question.

    The systems people are trying locally are Airband, Starlight, and 4G none of which seem to we 100% reliable sadly. I should add that a quick Google of Starlight says it's a satellite system but they did a visit here and looked and tried to see if we had a line of sight to a relay so maybe not just satellite systems.
  4.  
    We had problems with Openreach and in the end ditched them and used a local WiMAX supplier.
    • CommentAuthorSprocket
    • CommentTimeJan 10th 2019 edited
     
    Are you rural? Have you checked any local broadband providers?
    Around the SouthWest we have TrueSpeed putting in 200MBps broadband to rural communities at pretty decent prices. Their expansion is slow but it does seem to be happening. Truespeed's service is delivered by fibre strung over existing 240V power poles.
    Unfortunately our power comes in as a 5000v 3-phase set to a transformer so they can't do that here even though we're in the right area :-(

    Alternatively Satellite Broadband can be installed pretty much anywhere and a typical consumer setup with a small dish antenna can deliver 20-40MBps so better than ADSL and roughly comparable with what many people get from BT "Superfast Fibre".
    I believe costs were of the order or £50-£80 / month but it was some time ago that I looked into this.
  5.  
    Posted By: SprocketAre you rural? Have you checked any local broadband providers?
    Around the SouthWest we have TrueSpeed putting in 200MBps broadband to rural communities at pretty decent prices.


    We are rural and also in the South West. Unfortunately we also have the high voltage lines around our house so they can't string onto the power line (even though the old existing phoneline did - they can only remove not replace!)

    Posted By: djhMy first thought there would be to consult a solicitor (or ask on a legal forum?) and see whether you or Openreach have any rights that trump your road-owner's objection.


    That's the irony - we do have certain rights, conferred in the deeds, which our solicitor has passed on. However the standard approach means the operators still have to ask permission before starting work and since the landowner has ceased communicating, the easy option for Openreach is to just cancel the order rather than pursue it through the courts...

    Sounds like Satellite/relay may be the only other option. We definitely have line of sight to a big radio transmitter on the horizon but I don't know what that means in practice yet.

    Thanks for the help guys.
    • CommentAuthorSteveZ
    • CommentTimeJan 10th 2019
     
    I seem to remember that BT (and other utilities) can use a 'wayleave' to gain access to land to install lines. Was this ever correct and does it still apply if it was?
  6.  
    Posted By: SteveZI seem to remember that BT (and other utilities) can use a 'wayleave' to gain access to land to install lines. Was this ever correct and does it still apply if it was?


    That is correct and yes what usually happens is they arrange a form of 'rent' with the landowner for the ongoing right to access the land as necessary to maintain the equipment etc.

    Where this breaks down is if the landowner isn't interested.

    As you imply, they can force wayleaves where necessary through the courts but this is an expensive procedure that they generally avoid - particularly where the only 'gain' is one extra paying customer and an ongoing obligation to pay the now angry landowner in perpetuity...
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeJan 10th 2019
     
    Is "Moling " out of the question? Does that infringe a landowners rights?
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJan 10th 2019
     
    Perhaps you might be in a 'better'situation if your existing phoneline were accidently damaged or got blown down by the wind or something. Then it would be a case of the universal service obligation rather than just an additional or upgraded connection?
  7.  
    The 'universal service obligation' for newly build properties has several get outs, that protect openreach from having to do any awkward/expensive connections.

    Posted By: Doubting_Thomas
    That's the irony - we do have certain rights, conferred in the deeds, which our solicitor has passed on.


    Agreed! It is ironic that you can have 'rights', but the only way to enforce them is so draining and stressful that the 'rights' are effectively unenforceable. Our action to enforce our rights caused such an angry neighbour relationship that it spoiled our enjoyment of the house (dog poo appearing on our steps, deliveries intercepted, random obstructive parking, lies told to our friends, abuse anytime they we sat out in the garden, bins 'knocked over', etc).

    We will never again buy a plot that relies on legal 'rights' over the neighbours for access or services.

    Suggest to steer clear of legal routes to force a line across their land. Go with a wireless hookup, be nice to your neighbours for a couple of years and they might come round to voluntarily allowing access, or move out and be replaced.
    • CommentAuthorphiledge
    • CommentTimeJan 10th 2019 edited
     
    <blockquote>

    That's the irony - we do have certain rights, conferred in the deeds, which our solicitor has passed on.</blockquote>

    If youve got the right to run services along the shared road, why dont you run the duct and cable then get BT to connect up.

    If youre concerned about any backlash, do it while the neighbours are on holiday.
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