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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

PLEASE NOTE: A download link for Volume 1 will be sent to you by email and Volume 2 will be sent to you by post as a book.

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    • CommentAuthorCerisy
    • CommentTimeFeb 9th 2019
     
    I've posted before regarding our issues with overheating last summer for the hot weeks we experienced here in Normandy. Our new house is insulated to PH standards and we struggled to lose heat. This is forecast to be an increasing issue and as we are not "spring-chickens" we need to address the problem.

    Our MVHR unit is a Titon with summer bypass. Unfortunately the Titon summer bypass is automatic and cuts in when the air coming into the unit is hotter than the air being expelled. As the supply pipe comes through the loft, which of course gets very hot during the day, it kicked in during the afternoon. I quickly disabled the summer bypass so it didn't pull in hotter air and as it sounded like we were living next to Heathrow! So what to do for this year ...

    Firstly we can simply switch off the MVHR when it gets silly hot and use our tilt turn windows at night to reduce the temp in the house and freshen the air (why didn't I think of that last year? Probably as I fitted the system and it seemed counter intuitive to switch it off!). Secondly we could replace the Titon with a alternative model that has manual summer bypass that we could use at night - still switching off the unit during the day.

    The end game I guess is to install air-conditioning - one downstairs and one in our bedroom. They would need to be linked to installing PV to cover the electricity usage of course, but as the cost of that drops maybe not too expensive, even in France!

    Any thoughts guy? Regards, Jonathan
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeFeb 9th 2019
     
    Posted By: CerisyUnfortunately the Titon summer bypass is automatic and cuts in when the air coming into the unit is hotter than the air being expelled.

    That doesn't sound right, or sensible. Certainly under those conditions the summer bypass on our Brink would be closed. It only opens if the house is over the set temperature and the external temperature is less than the internal temperature. Are you sure that's what it does, and that's what it's supposed to do?

    FWIW, our summer bypass opens at night in the summer and closes during hot days. I expect that's what all automatic bypasses are supposed to do.

    If there's a duct through your loft, it should be very well insulated. Is it?

    If it was very noisy, it sounds like you also have the Summer Boost feature. Why not just turn that off if you don't want it? You could also reduce the boost speed to something more acceptable.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeFeb 9th 2019
     
    Mad drawing air in through the loft in summer no wonder you have the overheating problem.
    • CommentAuthorCerisy
    • CommentTimeFeb 9th 2019
     
    Agreed Tony - but it will be difficult to change the supply duct from the loft and soffit. Trying to take it out through the heavily insulated walls ain't going to be easy.

    The explanation of the function of the unit came from the manufacture! Yes, the supply duct could be better insulated, but the bypass function will still be wrong. Not sure about the summer boost - if it has it yes that would explain the noise - I'll check the manual! Normal boost speed is fine - bathrooms cleared quickly.
    • CommentAuthorjfb
    • CommentTimeFeb 9th 2019
     
    Are there other ways to reduce summer heat? External shading from solar gain maybe?
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeFeb 9th 2019
     
    Posted By: CerisyThe explanation of the function of the unit came from the manufacture!

    I'd go back to them and get them to explain it again then. Specifically how that arrangement keeps you cool in summer. In writing of course.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeFeb 9th 2019
     
    It is no good shading windows if you are blowing solar heated air into the building
    • CommentAuthorCerisy
    • CommentTimeFeb 10th 2019
     
    All the south windows are shaded by either large overhanging eaves or a long front porch. The east and west windows are more problematic as, of course, the sun is at a lower angle, but we have fitted external roller shutters to keep that heat out.

    Good point djh - should have done that before trying to sort it myself! Doh!

    Tony, I'm back to switching it off when too hot - maybe that's an answer to these really well insulated houses??
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeFeb 10th 2019
     
    I have one too, my air intake is straight from outside and it is rare that outside air is problematically hot
    I run summer bypass pretty much six months of the year slowing the speed right down and raising it at night during any rare heatwaves.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeFeb 10th 2019
     
    Posted By: CerisyI'm back to switching it off when too hot - maybe that's an answer to these really well insulated houses??

    I mostly leave ours running during summer. When its very hot I slow it down during the day (the bypass will have closed but the less-than-100% efficiency means the ventilation is still slightly heating the house - much less than opening the windows though) and speed it up at night (when the bypass will have opened again and be cooling the house). But with our system it's very clear the automatic bypass acts to stabilise the temperature in the house most of the year.
    • CommentAuthorCerisy
    • CommentTimeFeb 11th 2019
     
    Thanks guys - I'll do some more work on it. It is usually a couple of degrees warmer down here so I need to do something as we face a warmer world. Regards, Jonathan
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