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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

PLEASE NOTE: A download link for Volume 1 will be sent to you by email and Volume 2 will be sent to you by post as a book.

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    • CommentAuthorRex
    • CommentTimeMar 22nd 2019
     
    What ho one and all,

    I have some fencing and a normal wooden shed, that in the past, I have painted black. I have used either the Barrettine wood preserver or their dark creosote. Both make the wood black but over a short(ish) time, it somewhat fades and/or washes out. Most of it is so thin, I cannot really understand how it has any long term advantage beyond looking good after application!

    I frequently see houses with waney edge boarding as the external finish, and they are black; the colour has not faded or washed out; it is a deep, solid black.

    My question, what is this finish and where do I get it?

    Thanks and toodle pip
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 22nd 2019
     
    Black barn paint?
    • CommentAuthorjfb
    • CommentTimeMar 22nd 2019
     
    How about using up what you get from a car engine oil change! Might need a few vehicles though.
    • CommentAuthorgyrogear
    • CommentTimeMar 22nd 2019
     
    how about carbonising it with a blowtorch...

    "gangland style"...

    https://www.google.com/search?q=japanese+burnt+wood&client=firefox-b-d&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=piFB9_SR6H76OM%253A%252CRiB2ipeQEnC0SM%252C_&vet=1&usg=AI4_-kQ9OaTxK6wUfpIuMgCLOTNCWrJ4vw&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiVoqPCjJbhAhVmD2MBHRgRBHQQ9QEwAHoECAgQBA#imgrc=piFB9_SR6H76OM:&vet=1

    gg
    • CommentAuthorRex
    • CommentTimeMar 22nd 2019
     
    Carbonising is not on!

    Already use old engine oil, mainly to hopefully provide prolonged weatherproofing. Not sure how effective that is.

    May be Barn paint is what I am after. Will investigate further.

    Thanks and toodle pip
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeMar 22nd 2019
     
    Old engine oil is extremely toxic
    • CommentAuthorphiledge
    • CommentTimeMar 23rd 2019
     
    <blockquote><cite>Posted By: fostertom</cite>Old engine oil is extremely toxic</blockquote>

    As is the aforementioned creosote!!!!
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeMar 23rd 2019
     
    We used to use water based black ourdoor paint rollered on before we fitted our wide feather edged boards, if you fit them then paint them horrid white lines appear after the wood has finished shrinking.
    • CommentAuthorBeau
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2019 edited
     
    Bitumen paint should give you what you are after. Cresote is probably the best preservative if you can get the real thing but not as black as bitumen paint.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2019 edited
     
    • CommentAuthorBeau
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2019 edited
     
    Posted By: djhhttps://hsewatch.com/health-effects-of-bitumen-paint-exposure-and-safety-precautions" rel="nofollow" >https://hsewatch.com/health-effects-of-bitumen-paint-exposure-and-safety-precautions

    http://www.hse.gov.uk/biocides/copr/creosote.htm" rel="nofollow" >http://www.hse.gov.uk/biocides/copr/creosote.htm


    At least they are products that do the job they are supposed to. Having to replace external timbers every few years due to rot is not very environmentally friendly either.
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeMar 25th 2019 edited
     
    Use suitable, even local 'semi-durable' timbers then, like doug fir, which lasts indefinitely without treatment as long as it's not sitting in a puddle.

    Instead using feeble fast-grown softwood that's imported to UK because its countries of origin wouldn't touch it, and dousing it with toxics every few years (which doesn't even work for long) leads to rolling-catastrophy thinking like
    Posted By: Beau... products that do the job they are supposed to. Having to replace external timbers every few years due to rot is not very environmentally friendly either
    Sorry Beau!
    • CommentAuthorBeau
    • CommentTimeMar 25th 2019
     
    Posted By: fostertomUse suitable, even local 'semi-durable' timbers then, like doug fir, which lasts indefinitely without treatment as long as it's not sitting in a puddle.

    Instead using feeble fast-grown softwood that's imported to UK because its countries of origin wouldn't touch it, and dousing it with toxics every few years (which doesn't even work for long) leads to rolling-catastrophy thinking like
    Posted By: Beau... products that do the job they are supposed to. Having to replace external timbers every few years due to rot is not very environmentally friendly either
    Sorry Beau!


    No need to apologise Tom. I agree about trying to use more suitable timbers where possible but when it's keeping an existing structure going I will use what it takes. As you say "feeble fast-grown softwood" are a nightmare when combined with less effective wood treatments. We have had to replace some of the fencing on the farm after just three years while fencing which was done with the old treatments has lasted thirty years. Now trying to source chestnut or Creosote treated redwoods but both chestnut and redwoods (larch and douglas) are getting in short supply in the UK.

    I dont like using toxic treatments but surly having something last ten times longer has a lower long term impact?
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTimeMar 25th 2019
     
    Several companies make Barn Black. These days many are water based but you can still get oil based. Just make they say you can use it over existing oil based paints or creosote.

    Perhaps try

    Bedec Barn Paint Matt Black
    https://www.promain.co.uk/manufacturers/bedec/bedec-barn-paint.html?gclid=CjwKCAjw-OHkBRBkEiwAoOZql_7pP81Ht-Kegbd5RdE62YBMSaRcfGnMsTs5UFrdf7TOGKyR0k5jbBoCODMQAvD_BwE
    • CommentAuthornick1c
    • CommentTimeMar 25th 2019
     
    I painted our shed in osmo country colours black/charcoal last year & it is still as black as a black thing at night. Not cheap though.
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