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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

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  1.  
    Hard to word this one but we have an Isoquick foundation which broadly follows the detail of the diagram below.

    As a result the upstand edge of the insulation (Neopor?) is effectively exposed in the final condition, where not covered by the french drain gravel. The official detail describes no.11 as 'Protective Layer' and I've got a recollection that another detail I've seen calls it a render.

    Anyone got any suggestions for what we could use? I'm keen to avoid anything that might crack or be damaged by impact. Standard render seems a bit vulnerable to me.

    I could go down the metal flashing route but that seems fiddly and potentially expensive for ~50 linear meters.

    Thanks in advance.
      Design features.jpg
  2.  
    Photo of the real thing
      wall.jpg
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      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2019
     
    Our insulation has vertical edges, which makes things a lot simpler. I bought a load of paving slabs - Type D council slabs IIRC 600x900x50 - and just stood them up alongside the insulation. They're held in place and mostly covered by the stone in the French drain. I suppose you could do the same and fill the strange gap at the top with more stone? In my case there's some Lacomet flashing covering the outside of the sole plate that overlaps the top of the slabs.

    Your slab looks very deep. Varying between 200 and 300 mm! Why does it vary?
  3.  
    Thanks djh.

    It doesn't vary (I hope)! That detail is the official one from the isoquick website. Ours is a consistent depth, from memory it's 250mm but the modules come in standard sizes.

    I'm torn between raising the ground level to cover the insulation and keeping everything low enough that we don't risk water splashes on our facade (or ingress at thresholds).

    I think some form of paint on system is probably the way forward, despite my misgivings. But wondered if people recommended a particular brand or material.

    UV degradation is probably the main issue whichever way we go.

    EDIT

    just re-read your suggestion and you're saying to put the slabs vertically. Not sure we have the depth for that to fit behind the cladding, but it might work...
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2019
     
    Yes the slabs are vertical in my case. Looking at your drawing again, it might be you could lean some inwards at the top, resting on the insulation so maybe at 45° or so and with their bottom edges buried in the stone? The gap behind might prove attractive to some wildlife I suppose.
    • CommentAuthorPeterStarck
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2019 edited
     
    We have an Isoquick foundation using Peripor EPS insulation. My cladding covers the upstand down to the curvature so no part of the Peripor is visible. Once finished the curved part is covered with shingle.
      Brick Slips2 small.jpg
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      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2019
     
    FWIW, there is a picture of a very similar detail to DT's photo in the latest issue of PH+. It looks like they may have used slabs of some kind but it's not entirely clear.

    Peter, what does your installation look like at a door threshold?
  4.  
    Posted By: djhPeter, what does your installation look like at a door threshold?


    As requested.
      Front door1.JPG
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      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 30th 2019
     
    Very neat! We have what looks like a similar letter box. Ours is supposedly stainless but suffers from rust spots. It's the second we've had. The first died completely after a bit over three years. Can you recommend yours, and if so can you supply any details of it? TIA.
  7.  
    Posted By: djhVery neat! We have what looks like a similar letter box. Ours is supposedly stainless but suffers from rust spots. It's the second we've had. The first died completely after a bit over three years. Can you recommend yours, and if so can you supply any details of it? TIA.


    Our letter box is described as powder coated but I wouldn't recommend it. It's only a year old and under cover but it looks like it will rust. I've never been able to find a good aluminium or stainless steel external letter box.
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