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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

PLEASE NOTE: A download link for Volume 1 will be sent to you by email and Volume 2 will be sent to you by post as a book.

Buy individually or both books together. Delivery is free!


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  1.  
    Hi - Wool insulation is made using Thorlan IW as a moth repellant - which seems to be the replacement for Borax. Does anyone have any information about recycling sheep wool insulation at the end of its life?

    A quick look at Thorlan IW shows it is Potassium Fluoro Titatinate. The data sheet looks pretty awful.

    I keep sheep and I get that using wool as insulation is recycling something natural, however as the Thorlan IW chemical is 1% of the wool insulation, and the insulation itself is 5-20% polyester adhesive, is sheep wool insulation really a fully recyclable product at the end of its life?

    Also does anyone have any information about Potassium Fluoro Titatinate and bees?

    Thanks!
    • CommentAuthorMike1
    • CommentTime6 days ago
     
    Posted By: treeplanterI keep sheep and I get that using wool as insulation is recycling something natural, however as the Thorlan IW chemical is 1% of the wool insulation, and the insulation itself is 5-20% polyester adhesive, is sheep wool insulation really a fully recyclable product at the end of its life?

    Moth and wrinkle resistant jumpers? https://www.loveknitting.com/yarn-guide-link
  2.  
    Hey! That sounds good!

    I wear loads of jumpers and I am getting quite old. Do you think a wrinkle-resistant jumper could help me?

    :bigsmile:
    • CommentAuthormarktime
    • CommentTime6 days ago
     
    I'm getting on too so I'd be happy with a wrinkle-free face but I'm not sure that Thorlan IW would help me. More's the pity! :sad:
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTime3 days ago
     
    there are plenty of places for bees to nest that do not include in insulation, I have never seen bees nesting in insulation.
  3.  
    Posted By: tonythere are plenty of places for bees to nest that do not include in insulation, I have never seen bees nesting in insulation.


    We had a bumblebee nest in the glass fibre insulation in the ceiling above the kitchen in our old bungalow. Our neighbours had a bumblebee nest in the insulation in their wall cavity.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTime3 days ago
     
    Bees are fairly large as insects go, so insect netting should keep them out. The problem with moths and sheeps wool is that they eat it, not just nest in it. The protectants are designed to protect against creatures eating it, not just touching it, I think. I know of one place that was insulated using untreated wool and where they didn't seal all the openings ...
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