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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

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  1.  
    Couple of things from the Smart Export Guarantee consultation link earlier in the thread:

    To qualify for the guarantee of an export payment:
    1) your system must be MCS certified, no DIY or non-MCS fitters
    2) you must be exporting from a generation system IE not one with battery storage

    Could see these deterring some uptake among GBF

    Suppliers could voluntarily choose to pay you for exporting from your battery storage, but you've no guarantee they won't change their mind after you have paid to install the battery.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2019
     
    I suppose that a battery is not generating electricity or indeed exporting in a net sense, so it doesn't seem unreasonable that it should be excluded from an export scheme designed to support the installation of new generation schemes. Hopefully in due course there may be a scheme for battery-based balancing systems but at least one major proposed component of such systems - vehicle-to-grid - is still being developed, so it's not too surprising that a scheme to support installations is not yet there. Some suppliers are of course already offering schemes of their own. I think batteries are still in early-adopter territory.
  2.  
    It would be interesting to know how strict the definition of 'battery' is.

    We have 2 SunAmp units which take PV diverted power as a priority, with any surplus then exported to grid. This has been working quite well in the last few weeks of very variable weather. Any shortfall on grey days is drawn down from the grid.

    The SunAmp is technically heat storage rather than electricity storage, but by definition it bites a chunk out of the generated electricity that would otherwise be exported to the grid.

    Then again, so does my fridge, which is a form of negative-heat storage too I suppose...
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJun 24th 2019 edited
     
    Posted By: Doubting_ThomasIt would be interesting to know how strict the definition of 'battery' is.

    We have 2 SunAmp units which take PV diverted power as a priority, with any surplus then exported to grid.

    I'm not sure what your uncertainty is. The Smart Export Guarantee is all about guaranteeing payment for exports of electricity. A SunAmp doesn't do that, but it does reduce the exported electricity as you observe. So I think the effect is easily predictable.
    • CommentAuthorbhommels
    • CommentTimeJun 25th 2019
     
    @Doubting_Thomas
    Some light is shed on the HMRC argument here. It seems that the UK wants to be the best boy/girl in class, and that its "good" intentions backfire once again:
    https://www.pv-magazine.com/2019/05/08/uk-mulls-15-rise-in-vat-rates-that-would-hit-residential-solar-and-storage/
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTimeJul 3rd 2019
     
    Discovered this today. Looks like the EU will give companies that install solar PV grants of 20-40% when they install PV...

    http://www.res-legal.eu/search-by-country/belgium/single/s/res-e/t/promotion/aid/brussels-subsidy-aide-a-linvestissement/lastp/107/

    Extracts...

    Within the bounds of its available budget, the Brussels-Capital provides investment assistance for companies that develop environmental projects, including investments in renewable energy plants.

    Investments in photovoltaic installations are eligible under the following conditions (Annex 2, ArrĂȘtĂ© du 2 avril 2009):

    Eligible technologies

    Crystalline panels shall meet the requirements of the international standards IEC 61215 and have a minimum efficiency of 12 %
    Thin-film PV panels shall meet the requirements of the international standards IEC 61646 and have a minimum efficiency of 7 %

    Ammount

    The amount of the investment assistance depends on the size of the company (Art. 24 ArrĂȘtĂ© du 2 avril 2009):

    Micro and small enterprises: 40 % of the eligible costs
    Medium enterprises: 30 % of the eligible costs
    Large enterprises: 20 % of the eligible costs

    Moreover, the subsidy can be increased by 5 % if the company is certified Emas, ISO 14.000 or "eco-dynamic enterprise" (Art. 26 ArrĂȘtĂ© du 2 avril 2009).

    The amount of the investment assistance cannot exceed € 80,000 per company and per calendar year (Art. 22 ArrĂȘtĂ© du 2 avril 2009).
  3.  
    Posted By: CWattersDiscovered this today. Looks like the EU will give companies that install solar PV grants of 20-40% when they install PV...

    Just in time for Brexit :devil::devil::devil:
  4.  
    Did I read it right that this scheme is run by the council of the city of Brussels in Belgium, for companies in their city? It didn't seem to have anything to do with the EU, or be available outside of that city.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJul 3rd 2019
     
    Does it neatly avoid the rules about state subsidies by being funded by a local government unit? I wonder how the city is funded?
  5.  
    State aid rules apply to any/all levels of government and public bodies. But there is an exemption for funding for environmental objectives, and some other good causes. Similar to OFGEM dishing out RHI to companies in the UK.

    https://www.gov.scot/publications/state-aid-guidance/pages/general-block-exemption-regulation-gber/
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2019
     
    Posted By: WillInAberdeenDid I read it right that this scheme is run by the council of the city of Brussels in Belgium, for companies in their city? It didn't seem to have anything to do with the EU, or be available outside of that city.



    My bad. I think you are correct.
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2019
     
    It does kind of suggest the government could charge 20% VAT and give grants of a similar amount if they wanted to.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2019
     
    Posted By: CWattersIt does kind of suggest the government could charge 20% VAT and give grants of a similar amount if they wanted to.

    Yes, that thought occurred to me too. It seems they'd rather pocket the extra money and blame the EU.
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