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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

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    • CommentAuthorRex
    • CommentTimeJul 25th 2019
     
    What ho one and all,

    I have a secondary return, obviously on the hot water, but recently, at the most distant tap, I do not seem to be getting hot water quickly, I have to run the water until the dead-leg has cleared.

    The pump is adjacent to the cylinder and when fitted, has an isolation valve at each end; so theoretically, easy to replace. But of course, there are compression fittings on the valves.

    How do I remove the pump when I need a few centimetres of pipe movement to slide the compression off, and I suspect there is no such movement space?

    As to whether the pump is working or not, it turns on and hums / slight vibration, but is it actually pumping water. Is there a way to check without removing the pump?

    Thanks and toodle pip

    Rex
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeJul 25th 2019
     
    Can you post or link to a photo please
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJul 25th 2019
     
    Posted By: RexIs there a way to check without removing the pump?

    Well is there hot water being drawn through the plumbing and the recirculation pipe or not?
  1.  
    Posted By: RexThe pump is adjacent to the cylinder and when fitted, has an isolation valve at each end; so theoretically, easy to replace. But of course, there are compression fittings on the valves.

    How do I remove the pump when I need a few centimetres of pipe movement to slide the compression off, and I suspect there is no such movement space?


    Usually pumps have washers to seal the joints to the pump and these are between the isolating valve and the pump. You just turn off the isolating valves, undo the large nuts on the isolating valves and slide the pump out.
    • CommentAuthorGreenPaddy
    • CommentTimeJul 25th 2019
     
    That will be a bronze pump so prob over £200 to replace, so be sure it's knackered before replacing...replace the motor only??

    As djh says, keep pump switched off for a while to let loop pipes cool. Then switch pump on and should feel quick heating of loop pipes.
    • CommentAuthorRex
    • CommentTimeJul 25th 2019
     
    Thanks for the thoughts.

    I think the answer is page one of the user manual. I have the pump on an electronic timer so that it runs for around 10 mins every hour. The insulation tends to keep the water sufficiently warm between those times so the dead-leg is not too bad.

    A few weeks ago, we had a power outage. Didn't think to check the timer as it is supposed to have a built-in rechargeable battery to back-up in case of a power outage. Checked the timer at 15:00 this afternoon and it say 02:35. Checked the programs and they are all empty.

    So have to reset it and I guess all will be well.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeJul 25th 2019
     
    👍 I would programe it to be a hit more often just before you reckon thatyou will use hot water and forget the every hour bit
  2.  
    Did you find you could manage without it? They're more eco friendly in hotter droughtier countries, probably not the best in the UK (even today!) as they increase heat losses even when nobody is using hot water, while saving a little water wastage.

    Maybe have it come on only at peak times as Tony said, to get the best of both worlds?
    • CommentAuthorRex
    • CommentTimeJul 26th 2019
     
    The timer has 20 programs, so I have it set up to run for around 10 mins each time. About 6 times in the morning on an hourly basis from 05:00; a couple through late morning and afternoon, and the majority in the evening with a couple of set times at 30 min intervals at peak evening times.

    I'm not too concerned about heat loss as the pipes are not only insulated but as a timber frame house, all walls and the first floor are fully insulated with Warmcell, so all the pipework is surrounded by Warmcell. Additionally, the return pipework is only 10mm, so not a lot of water is pumped around.

    And although the water waste costs are probably rather low, it is just b***dy annoying having to wait 30+ plus for warm water to arrive. The distant bathroom (ensuite) is diametrically opposite the hot cylinder location. Next time, I will try to arrange the hot water usage areas and cylinder location in a layout that will reduce the dead-leg.

    Additionally,
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeJul 26th 2019
     
    Sounds like a good plan - note insulation does not stop heat losses only slows them so you might want to switch off the circulator in very hot weather and do an experiment to how long it takes the water in the pipes to cool. I reckon even with all that insulation less than an hour
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