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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

PLEASE NOTE: A download link for Volume 1 will be sent to you by email and Volume 2 will be sent to you by post as a book.

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    • CommentAuthorborpin
    • CommentTimeSep 9th 2019 edited
     
    From the BBC https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-49566130

    Poacher turned gamekeeper

    "Robert Skillen, who was the director of the firm when Mr Thompson bought his system, said Mr Thompson's panels would make him money.

    Mr Skillen is now in business claiming to help people who have been missold solar panels. He did not want to be interviewed."
    • CommentAuthorbhommels
    • CommentTimeSep 9th 2019
     
    Actually, for Mr Skillen it seems that it does!
    • CommentAuthorJeff B
    • CommentTimeSep 9th 2019
     
    Looking at the photo of his installation you can see that there are only 6 panels. It doesn't say when the panels were installed but if it was in the early 2010's then they were probably 180W jobs the same as mine. Mine will certainly pay off within 10 years but the major differences are that I have 21 panels and I live in South-west Wales. I guess Gateshead being much further north has less solar gain anyway and we don't know the orientation of the property. I definitely think Mr. Thompson was mis-sold in this case.
  1.  
    I was contacted out of the blue by a firm of no-win-no-fee solicitors who wanted me to claim against my ASHP installers for 'mis selling'. They said that it would not perform as expected, and I might get all my money back.

    I didn't respond, as they were obviously chancers who thought a small firm would just roll over and pay up.

    Those kind of sharks could be a real drag on the industry.

    I still don't know how they got my name, could only have come from an insider in the installer, the manufacturer or the RHI.
    • CommentAuthorphiledge
    • CommentTimeSep 9th 2019
     
    Nothing wrong with what Mr Skillen said about the panels making money, its just that £100/yr isnt going to clear a £10k loan
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTimeSep 9th 2019 edited
     
    I keep getting letters saying I can claim for an electric cable across my garden. I knew it was there when I purchased the plot. I know it feeds a barn belonging to an elderly neighbour a few houses down the road. Last thing I want to do is cause him any grief.

    Anyone know how easy it is to give away an easement to stop a future owner of my house and these vultures causing him grief? I'm assuming I'd need a solicitor to amend my deeds?

    PS: How do these vultures know it's there?
    • CommentAuthorgravelld
    • CommentTimeSep 10th 2019 edited
     
    Posted By: CWattersI keep getting letters saying I can claim for an electric cable across my garden. I knew it was there when I purchased the plot. I know it feeds a barn belonging to an elderly neighbour a few houses down the road. Last thing I want to do is cause him any grief.

    Anyone know how easy it is to give away an easement to stop a future owner of my house and these vultures causing him grief? I'm assuming I'd need a solicitor to amend my deeds?

    PS: How do these vultures know it's there?
    If you're referring to a wayleave for the DNO to access the electric cable, just phone the DNO and offer it for free, I'm sure they'll jump at the chance. The DNOs now do the admin for wayleaves themselves, I guess because they get so many claims.

    Or, you could accept the money they offer and buy some more PV/insulation/whatever with it...
    • CommentAuthorbhommels
    • CommentTimeSep 10th 2019
     
    There is an overhead cable straddling our drive and I get these letters too. I am in two minds about it, on one hand I do not want to feed the vultures, on the other hand a DNO is a commercial company with shareholders creaming off profits that come out of my energy bill, in the end. So I think I might claim and donate the proceedings to charity.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeSep 10th 2019
     
    Posted By: CWattersPS: How do these vultures know it's there?

    Maps of electricity supply cables are public record. I got a bunch when we built to check what there was around our plot. But how you would identify a particular place where there was a cable with no wayleave agreement is an interesting question. It seems like the only sensible way would be to run a query against the DNO's computer system. I don't know whether that is possible in any legal/moral way.
    • CommentAuthorborpin
    • CommentTimeSep 10th 2019
     
    IIRC there is a standard clause in more recent land deeds giving utility firms access without the need for wayleaves. My deeds are that old and in 2 separate parts, that one has it and the other does not. Never been properly combined.

    I've got a telegraph pole in my garden that I was offered £50 for a wayleave for. I declined (as I want rid one day) so I am just waiting until they need to climb it and I can tell them to piss off so they have to move it. It is the cable stay that is more of the issue than the pole itself. The fact they offered me money for the wayleave proves they don't have one.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeSep 10th 2019
     
    Posted By: borpinIIRC there is a standard clause in more recent land deeds giving utility firms access without the need for wayleaves.

    Are you thinking of easements granted for the provision of transmission equipment on a new-build development site? (i.e. typically a new estate of dwellings?). That's the only thing I can think of, but there's no automatic incorporation of clauses that I'm aware of, just 'standard' words provided by the DNO that are used when one is needed. Certainly our deed came into existence when we bought the land and there's no mention of an easement for the guy wire that supports a pole just outside our boundary. I'd like to be rid of that guy wire at some point too!

    I'm just waiting until its rusty enough that they decide they need to do something about it. I don't understand why they didn't put the pole a little further away from our boundary so the guy wire could go in the field with it.
  2.  
    Posted By: gravelldThe DNOs now do the admin for wayleaves themselves, I guess because they get so many claims.


    after getting repeated letters from "Vultures" we contacted and dealt with the DNO ourselves directly, used the local solicitor that we have used for 20+ years, they paid our solicitors fees and we got a decent payment as well.
  3.  
    Call me old fashioned, but electricity, water, drains, phones etc, are all semi-public community services that everyone benefits from - shouldn't the flip side of that be that everyone provides free access for these services across their patch to supply their neighbours'? Quid pro quo and all that.

    Especially for pre existing pipes and cables. I could see some compensation due for the temporary disruption of a new run being dug in.

    The DNO will just pass their costs of dealing with a wayleave 'claims culture', on to anyone who needs a new connection - we heard on GBF how expensive this is - and any unrecovered costs will end up in everyone else's bills.

    The claims culture works off the 'tragedy of the commons' - each individual feels they could benefit by making a claim, even if that adds costs for everyone collectively.


    I had a letter from a vulture firm asking me to claim wayleave for a LV pole. The nearest ones are actually on my neighbour's land, not mine. I don't think they're checking much before they send them out, if at all. The next step will be the same recorded calls that you get for 'an accident that wasn't your fault' !
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTime3 days ago
     
    In most cases, overhead cables are preferred by the utilities to burying them in ducts simply for cheapness, I believe, so it seems right to me that there should be some discincentive to this, since in all the cases I can think of it is better for the common good to have services underground.
  4.  
    Wayleave agreements are equally applicable to underground as well as overground electricity services AFAIK.

    The extra costs of burying the services, are just passed on to all bill payers, unless it's a single-user connection. I live in a rural area where overhead services are definitely in the common good - it would be uneconomic for us to have power or phones, if they had to go underground! We never had mains gas in the area for this reason, and many of us don't have mains water.
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