Home  5  Books  5  GBEzine  5  News  5  HelpDesk  5  Register  5  GreenBuilding.co.uk
Not signed in (Sign In)

Categories



Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

PLEASE NOTE: A download link for Volume 1 will be sent to you by email and Volume 2 will be sent to you by post as a book.

Buy individually or both books together. Delivery is free!


powered by Surfing Waves




Vanilla 1.0.3 is a product of Lussumo. More Information: Documentation, Community Support.

Welcome to new Forum Visitors
Join the forum now and benefit from discussions with thousands of other green building fans and discounts on Green Building Press publications: Apply now.




    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeOct 9th 2019
     
    Has anybody looked at The Future Homes Standard: changes to Part L and Part F of the Building Regulations for new dwellings ?

    Research into ventilation and indoor air quality in new homes
    Research into overheating in new homes

    https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/the-future-homes-standard-changes-to-part-l-and-part-f-of-the-building-regulations-for-new-dwellings
    •  
      CommentAuthorDamonHD
    • CommentTimeOct 9th 2019
     
    Yes, and did the consultation/survey.

    Rgds

    Damon
    • CommentAuthorcjard
    • CommentTimeOct 12th 2019
     
    From the Consultation doc:

    Table 3.1 - Minimum standards for fabric performance

    External walls 0.26 W/m2.K
    Party walls 0.20 W/m2.K
    Floor 0.18 W/m2.K
    Roof 0.16 W/m2.K
    Windows 1.6 W/m2.K
    Roof-lights1 2.2 W/m2.K
    Door 1.6 W/m2.K
    Air permeability 8m3/m2.K at 50Pa

    The proposed walls value could be better but that air permeability is nearly as much of a joke as the existing standard, no?

    Also the doc says elsewhere that sone of the backlash from big building is that there aren't enough people available to install heat pumps - surely this is BS, as you need fewer certifications to install a monobloc ASHP than you do a gas boiler (no corgi, just a g3 for pressurised systems, itself not needed if an open vent TS is used but how many gas boiler installers don't have a g3

    What we actually probably need is training courses for Joe Public on "how to live in a low energy home" to get them out of the "get home and blast the 28kw boiler at full tilt for 3 hours" mindset
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeOct 12th 2019
     
    Posted By: cjardAlso the doc says elsewhere that sone of the backlash from big building is that there aren't enough people available to install heat pumps - surely this is BS, as you need fewer certifications to install a monobloc ASHP than you do a gas boiler (no corgi, just a g3 for pressurised systems, itself not needed if an open vent TS is used but how many gas boiler installers don't have a g3

    I expect they're talking about F gas certification.

    Agree with the rest of your post though.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeOct 12th 2019
     
    The U - values are in sufficiently good, and like you say air tightness is a JOKE

    For me walls, floors and ceilings less than 0.1, party wall can be 0.2 air tightness ONE
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeOct 12th 2019
     
    I don't understand the logic of allowing party walls to be less insulated. Yes, if there's somebody living next door and they heat their house then the heat loss will be less, but I think it's better to treat that as a bonus. Sometimes houses are left empty, or even one-half of a pair is knocked down for some reason, so it seems better to me to leave it the same standard as other walls. A party wall already need to meet stricter requirements for noise insulation anyway, so I'd expect that bringing the thermal insulation up to standard wouldn't be terribly difficult. So the goverment proposal makes more sense to me.

    I think a max U-value of 0.1 in every region is unduly strict for the building regs backstop. It might be necessary in some parts of the country, but not in sheltered southern locations. Specifically I wouldn't have been able to build my house with that limit. I'd prefer a whole building heat loss limit as calculated by PHPP, or at worst a more realistic limit such as 0.15, but unless windows and doors are tightned up even that doesn't make much sense.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeOct 13th 2019
     
    When the house is empty it still resists heat loss unless all the windows are open effectively the U value is much better than the 0.2 of the wall itself
    • CommentAuthorSigaldry
    • CommentTimeOct 15th 2019 edited
     
    Those are the worst allowable area weighted limiting values I'd note (although they are still worse than those already currently in place in Wales or Scotland).

    The notional building fabric U-values (windows, doors, walls, roofs and floors)for the two options consulted upon, combined with tighter thermal bridging should result in overall improvements compared to current levels. The fabric in Option 1 is better, but Option 2 uses a PV requirement for target setting (not actually required, just sets the targets).

    (See Appendix R of https://www.bregroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/SAP-10.1-10-10-2019.pdf for notional packages used for target setting).
    • CommentAuthorcjard
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2019 edited
     
    Posted By: djh
    I expect they're talking about F gas certification.


    F has only needed for split systems though and I'd wager the majority of installs these days are monobloc
Add your comments

    Username Password
  • Format comments as
 
   
The Ecobuilding Buzz
Site Map    |   Home    |   View Cart    |   Pressroom   |   Business   |   Links   
Logout    

© Green Building Press