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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

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    • CommentAuthorRex
    • CommentTimeDec 5th 2019
     
    What ho one and all,

    I visited a neighbour how has recently completed a small job, converting the garage into a room which they intend to use as a gym.

    The builder recommended a large, large mirror would be good, so on the builders recommendation, a 6x4, 3mm mirrored perspex mirror has been purchased, ready to hang, with mirror cement. . My reaction to installing it, and not to have a fun-filled 'Hall of Mirrors' wacky reflection, was 'Good luck with that!.'

    I do have some experience with this kind of job as i worked in TV commercial special effects department. We would have obtained a glass mirror rather than perspex because the reflection would not be flat. But of course, cost would not have been in issue!

    I cannot see how this can be glued to a plastered wall and provide a nice, flat reflection. Am I missing something? What would be the best solution?

    Thanks and toodle pip

    Rex
  1.  
    I would make a frame with say 18mm osb as a backing and then attach the mirror to that when laid flat on the floor and then hang the whole lot on the wall probably by screwing a batten to wall at the base to sit the mirror on and then fix at the top.......Just my initial thoughts
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeDec 5th 2019
     
    What PiH says, although I expect even so the mirror will never be truly flat. It depends how picky your friends are.
    When you say 6 x 4, what units? 6 m x 4 m sounds like a tall garage but 6' x 4' doesn't sound like a very big mirror?

    Mirror screws instead of cement would allow adjustment, but I'm not sure how many would be needed to hold the mirror flat. Oh, and paint the OSB a uniform colour before mounting the mirror, in case its not 100% reflective.
  2.  
    <blockquote><cite>Posted By: djh</cite>Oh, and paint the OSB a uniform colour before mounting the mirror, in case its not 100% reflective.</blockquote>
    Good idea - and paint it a uniform white !!
    • CommentAuthorRex
    • CommentTimeDec 5th 2019
     
    Thanks for the thoughts.

    It is guesswork but I would say it is 6x4 feet.

    Must admit, a frame is my idea so that basically, the mirror will be self flattening in the middle.

    I'm not after the definitive answer to give him as obviously, his builder will 'know' what to do. But I suspect the builder has little idea and I was just giving him a heads-up warning based upon my humble opinion.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeDec 5th 2019
     
    Posted By: Peter_in_HungaryGood idea - and paint it a uniform white !!

    Either white or black works, but look different.

    Posted By: RexIt is guesswork but I would say it is 6x4 feet.
    Must admit, a frame is my idea so that basically, the mirror will be self flattening in the middle.

    The only trouble with a frame is if they decide they like it and want to put more alongside it :)
    Plastic mirrors in frames aren't completely flat IME, but they're nearly so.
  3.  
    Posted By: djhThe only trouble with a frame is if they decide they like it and want to put more alongside it :)
    Plastic mirrors in frames aren't completely flat IME, but they're nearly so.

    I wasn't thinking of a frame as you would use for a glass mirror but rather a frame with an OSB filled back on to which the poly mirror would be fixed
    • CommentAuthorgyrogear
    • CommentTimeDec 6th 2019 edited
     
    Perhaps laminated clickfloor boards would be thinner (and lighter)

    Could route a couple of channels in the plasterboard and insert glued battens, to take either adhesive or screws for the backplane...

    gg
  4.  
    All the backing boards that have been mentioned, will flex a little if screwed down onto a wonky wall, or in a humid room. But a new plasterboard wall should be pretty flat and vertical and it's easy to check this.

    How about they just try placing the mirror against the wall and see how it looks? If it's ok then stick it with thin glue and a straightedge. If not, fiddle around with plaster and a sander until it is :-)

    If it's for a gym, perhaps they could bend the mirror so they look slimmer in the middle, with more muscles at the top...!
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTimeDec 7th 2019
     
    Just for info.. 6x4 glass mirror is about £85 on Amazon.
  5.  
    But a perspex mirror might be seen as safer
    • CommentAuthorRex
    • CommentTimeDec 7th 2019
     
    Agreed, would be useful to make them look thinner.

    Would not imagine that safety is an issue; don't think they will be trying kick-boxing.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeDec 7th 2019
     
    Posted By: RexWould not imagine that safety is an issue;

    Does it depend how they fix it? Certainly if it was a window, toughened glass would be required, but I've no idea whether there are any similar regs that apply to glass in a mirror? Seems odd if not, since the chances of a mirror falling off a wall must be higher than that of a window breaking.
  6.  
    Mirror glass is not normally toughened, though toughened mirror is available for niche applications. Often, big mirrors are glued to the wall (which will retain any broken bits) but otherwise you can stick plastic safety film to the back.
    • CommentAuthorRex
    • CommentTimeDec 23rd 2019
     
    Just a final heads-up.

    My neighbour took what I told him on board and was persuaded by the builder that he had a lot of experience in putting up 3mm acrylic mirrors and all would be hunky dory.

    Now he has a slightly wavy mirror / reflection that would certainly annoy me. It apparent does annoy his wife and now they know that my advice was correct.

    May be the issue was the weight of a large glass mirror hanging on a plasterboard wall. They should have used Fermacell!
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